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Old 06-13-2024, 06:32 PM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
7,469 posts, read 5,396,641 times
Reputation: 18258

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Farmers aren't buying water. They get it from their own wells, ponds, rivers & streams.....Municiple water is priced according to cost of supplying it. The water itself is "free," so to speak.. Prices set according to supply & demand have the additional factor of profit.....Classic question-- How high does the price of a gallon of gasoline have to go before you stop buying it?

If you move to Alaska, don't complain about the cold winters. If you remain in the SW, don't whine about no water.
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Old 06-13-2024, 06:42 PM
 
634 posts, read 343,986 times
Reputation: 952
Quote:
Originally Posted by guidoLaMoto View Post
Farmers aren't buying water. They get it from their own wells, ponds, rivers & streams.....Municiple water is priced according to cost of supplying it. The water itself is "free," so to speak.. Prices set according to supply & demand have the additional factor of profit.....Classic question-- How high does the price of a gallon of gasoline have to go before you stop buying it?

If you move to Alaska, don't complain about the cold winters. If you remain in the SW, don't whine about no water.
Maybe the southwest should charge for water it’s not free out there with no surplus.no whining allowed I agree but other than recent decline in populations in ca might only savior but it seems Arizona is picking up those leaving in numbers.
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Old 06-14-2024, 10:21 AM
 
10,013 posts, read 7,948,982 times
Reputation: 25120
You might enjoy researching the history and politics of water in the west. My brother is really into all that. It's so much bigger than your local policies.
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Old 06-15-2024, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Kansas
26,313 posts, read 22,467,183 times
Reputation: 27193
We lived in the Tucson, AZ area for 6 years. I was amazed and disgusted that they were irrigating fields to grow COTTON, yes, I said COTTON! It was done by a University there. In the AZ heat, irrigation waters evaporate quickly. As we were leaving there, they were building a golf course. And, although it was great, we had rural water out in the county, and the rates were the cheapest we had ever experienced.

There are problems with the Ogallala Aquifer here in SW KS. The industrial beef farms dominate that area. Much of KS is in some state of drought.

https://www.kcur.org/2023-04-04/with...-to-irrigation

"Water levels in the Ogallala Aquifer continue to plummet as farm irrigation swallows an average of more than 2 billion gallons of groundwater per day statewide. But after decades of mostly inaction from Kansas leaders, the state’s approach to water conservation might finally be starting to shift."

I have heard in the past that eventually, we will see wars fought over water. I know they get in squabbles over the Colorado River water.

They were wanting to put in a slaughter house in our small town, but the people are fighting it. The amount of water they use is unbelievable! We already have a Smithfield plant sucking down a good share, and the water bills here, being generous to them I am sure, are high.

People have become so wasteful of everything, which isn't helping either.
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Old 06-15-2024, 12:52 PM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
7,469 posts, read 5,396,641 times
Reputation: 18258
We gotta agree that bringing In new, high water usage Industrial activities should be discouraged in arid regions.We missed the boat by not doing it earlier.

Israel occupied/annexed the Golan Heights in 1981 because that's the source of the Jodan River and Israel's only access to sweet water at the time....Since then they've established very successful sea water desalinization plants that not only fill their domestic needs but also is produced in excess for export....If the ignorant do-gooders here would get out of the way with their impossible regs, we could be doing that here too and this thread would have been unnecssary.
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Old 06-15-2024, 07:19 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
5,119 posts, read 7,553,139 times
Reputation: 8844
Quote:
Originally Posted by guidoLaMoto View Post
Farmers aren't buying water. They get it from their own wells, ponds, rivers & streams.....Municiple water is priced according to cost of supplying it. The water itself is "free," so to speak.. Prices set according to supply & demand have the additional factor of profit.....Classic question-- How high does the price of a gallon of gasoline have to go before you stop buying it?

If you move to Alaska, don't complain about the cold winters. If you remain in the SW, don't whine about no water.
Farmers in the SW purchase water rights, and those that don't have water rights purchase or lease water from those who do.

If you live in the Midwest, don't complain about industrial and agricultural wastes and chemicals in your water.
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Old 06-16-2024, 08:14 AM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
7,469 posts, read 5,396,641 times
Reputation: 18258
Touche'. ...No place is perfect....Here in WI we're starting to see problems from the consolidation of small family dairy farms being replaced by huge CAFO operations....Instead of many small, private wells across a county, the large operations are establishing high capacity wells that suck all the small ones dry for miles around.

Water "rights?"... Next wlll be Air Rights......I understand that in some places there are laws against even collecting rain water on your own property. Disgraceful....Those rights are basically taxes-- it's OK to waste water as long as you pay the govt for it. Cf-- carbon credits.

One of my favorite movie scenes is the one in Angel and The Badman where John Wayne "persuades" the stingy old codger to knock out the top two boards on his dam. https://www.google.com/search?q=ange...obile&ie=UTF-8

Last edited by guidoLaMoto; 06-16-2024 at 08:25 AM..
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Old 06-16-2024, 11:12 AM
 
Location: New Mexico
5,119 posts, read 7,553,139 times
Reputation: 8844
Many small, private wells are very inefficient, since the wastewater is lost or ends up in a residential septic system. In medium and large municipalities there are wastewater treatment plants where the water is purified back to drinking water quality and released back into the water-supply.

The US government built numerous dams and reservoirs throughout the West, and established a system of water rights to allocate this resource equitably among Indian tribes, agricultural users, and municipal customers across many competing jurisdictions. The SW has depended on irrigation for thousands of years.

When people see huge reservoirs (like Lake Mead and others) looking almost empty, it looks scary, but every inch is managed. The level of the reservoirs is planned. There is no profit in keeping them full, or even above very low levels, so generally if there is water to be had it will get used. They won't allocate water to some users in years when levels are dangerously low.

Here's just one of many reservoirs serving New Mexico:



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7DdOPI4Nq3s
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Old 06-16-2024, 06:14 PM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
7,469 posts, read 5,396,641 times
Reputation: 18258
Small, private wells & septic systems don't waste water. Waste water enters the septic tank and then is filtered thru the soil returning it from whence it came. It's a cycle.

The dams/ reservoirs in the SW help by holding back water otherwise destind to be dumped in the ocean. The reservoir allows it to be used for some useful purpose before being returned to the natural water cycle..,

....The Colo. R., for some decades now, is the only river in world that doesn't empty into a larger body of water. It poops out in the desert now before reaching its natural destination of the Gulf of Cortez. I guess that's efficiency akin to the old meat processors saying "we use every part but the oink."....but it doesn't allow much room for growth or unusual drought.

Waste not, want not.. and save for a rainy day-- the whole point of conservation.
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Old 06-16-2024, 07:39 PM
 
15,730 posts, read 15,908,259 times
Reputation: 22352
I'm hoping the news of Mexico City may provide a wake-up call.
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