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Old 03-09-2009, 09:24 AM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,545 posts, read 27,756,038 times
Reputation: 88791

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I am doing my first veggie garden this year and I am so excited. I would love any help and knowledge that you would all like to share. If you have the time or the inclination please c'mon over and help some of us out.

//www.city-data.com/forum/garde...gardening.html

and

//www.city-data.com/forum/garde...ng-anyone.html

Thank you all and have a great day.

Lisa
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Old 03-10-2009, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
32,512 posts, read 52,935,349 times
Reputation: 22331
Gardening is different in each region.

Are you focusing on organic?
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Old 03-12-2009, 10:27 PM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,068 posts, read 76,852,967 times
Reputation: 27652
You should get some books that explain veggie gardening in your locale. Each zone is different and has different soil types. Find a book about your zone and area - some of them even have the recommended varieties that grow well in your area/soil.

I do square foot gardening for my veggies and love it..I have heavy clay soil but after years and years of having my square foot raised beds the soil is soft and fluffy

I have Mel Bartholomew's book as my reference - the 1981 version. I think his latest version got a bit "yuppy" with the fancy beds and all.

Looks like you can get it used on Amazon for about $5.00..great reference book IMO.
Customer Image Gallery for Square Foot Gardening
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Old 03-15-2009, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Vermont
5,441 posts, read 15,511,870 times
Reputation: 2641
Try the library and look for Rodale or Albert Howard
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Old 03-15-2009, 08:55 AM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,545 posts, read 27,756,038 times
Reputation: 88791
Thanks all,

FB- No organic this year. I want to start simple and work my way up.

HT- I have the new version of that book and that's what I am doing this year.

I know gardening and plants are regional but some things are the same.

Tips on how to keep any critters out.
What kind of wood used for a raised bed?
What do you use to hold tomato plants. Trellises or do you make your own? And how?
What do you use or make for climbing veggies like beans?
Does anyone one do container gardening? What size containers and how many plants?

See there are many things and gardening questions that are not regional and I just thought some of you would like to help on the above sites.

Thanks all
Lisa
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Old 03-15-2009, 10:05 AM
 
37 posts, read 99,254 times
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Try this Permaculture site: MyBackAchers.com - it has a lot of low energy garden links as well as cheap ways to put food up without costly electric or canning.
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Old 03-15-2009, 05:54 PM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,068 posts, read 76,852,967 times
Reputation: 27652
I use non treated wood. Yes I have to replace every 5 years or so but it takes about 1/2 day to replace the frames. I looked at other materials but the cost was too high.

I make my own trellis system for vining plants and tomatoes..I go wandering at my local Home Depot and see what my imagination can do based on what I see. I like making my own stuff.
Wire holds them up better than string though.
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Old 03-20-2009, 05:50 PM
 
Location: San Diego, Ca
749 posts, read 1,648,307 times
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Lisa; for my tomato plants I go to Lowe's and get their green stakes. You can get them in different lengths. I get the tall ones. As my plants grow, I snip off the suckers that grow right in a fork of the branches. My plants get tall and produce larger tomatoes. I've been doing this for years. An elderly gentleman told me this years and years ago and I've been doing it ever since. You won't get as many tomoatoes; but you will get larger ones.

You also want to make sure you have enough space between the plants. I always plant mine around 4 to 5 feet apart. That way they have enough room to grow and you will have enough room to walk around them when looking for tomatoes. And tomato worms. And they can be hard to see.

I have also grown them in pickle buckets or clay pots. They did well in both. The pickle buckets you will have to put holes in the bottom of them so the water can drain. The clay you will just have to make sure you don't over water.

Cucumbers I used PVC pipe and made it to where the plant would grab hold and grow up on the pole. It's amazing watching how their little feelers go toward whatever they can.

Squash you can use the same type of pole that you use for the tomatoes.

Hope this helps.
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Old 03-20-2009, 06:07 PM
 
Location: Albemarle, NC
7,730 posts, read 13,154,405 times
Reputation: 1508
Ruth Stout. All I got to say.
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Old 03-20-2009, 10:46 PM
 
Location: Maine
6,200 posts, read 11,964,934 times
Reputation: 6100
Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyTexan View Post
You should get some books that explain veggie gardening in your locale. Each zone is different and has different soil types. Find a book about your zone and area - some of them even have the recommended varieties that grow well in your area/soil.
Do you mean USDA zones? USDA Hardiness Zones only tell us the average annual coldest temperature for a given area. That's all. All of the soil on my farm is in one zone but varies greatly within the 45 acres. If you're growing perennials or in winter, USDA zones are useful.
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