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Old 03-19-2008, 12:47 PM
 
8,862 posts, read 17,483,637 times
Reputation: 2280

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--I will grow some stevia, parsley, rosemary, dill and mint.
--Continue to collect rain water.
--Limit use of plastics.
--Pick up the trash of others when I think to bring gloves as I attempt to walk in my overdeveloped neighborhood.
--Continue to contact appropriate departments of my local government about environmental concerns. You can contact them, fill out a form. Sometimes funding is not available to address concerns.

I live very carefully but sometimes I get in my car and spend $6 at Caribou or Starbucks and feel no guilt.
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Old 03-19-2008, 01:21 PM
 
182 posts, read 450,751 times
Reputation: 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by TakeAhike View Post
--I will grow some stevia, parsley, rosemary, dill and mint.
--Continue to collect rain water.
--Limit use of plastics.
--Pick up the trash of others when I think to bring gloves as I attempt to walk in my overdeveloped neighborhood.
--Continue to contact appropriate departments of my local government about environmental concerns. You can contact them, fill out a form. Sometimes funding is not available to address concerns.

I live very carefully but sometimes I get in my car and spend $6 at Caribou or Starbucks and feel no guilt.
Good TakeAhike,

I think these are all good things to do for the environment. I have tried to reuse or repurpose what I have, buy organic and local, recycle, I am transitioning all my household cleansers to biodegradable and my beauty products, as well as my lawn care/flower care and use my reusable bags. I live in Georgia and we are still in a dought so I don't flush every time and I take 11 min showers (I can't get lower than that). When I have to replace a appliance if I can't fix it, I buy the best energy star I can. I did not do all these things one day just a bit at a time. Also since I don't use bad cleansers I can use my dish water, to water my plants. I little bit at a time
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Old 03-19-2008, 01:28 PM
 
182 posts, read 450,751 times
Reputation: 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by sierraAZ View Post
I leave the environment alone. It's been doing OK for thousands and thousands of years before some started "taking care of it"; it'll be fine for many more if only left alone.
I understand that the earth has been around for a while and you are correct in saying how resiliant it has been but I am not sure that negates our responsibility to do what we can to leave it the way or better than when we found it. Perhaps your comment has something to do with your dislike of what you view as an "extremist" point-of-view.
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Old 03-19-2008, 01:35 PM
 
182 posts, read 450,751 times
Reputation: 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by ptsum View Post
Let's see, I have replaced all my incandescent lights with compact fluorescent, got rid of my gas furnace and put in a geothermal system, my wife uses the cloth recyclable bags when she goes to store, I don't put any kind of fertilizer on my lawn, no sense creating more work for myself, converting my pickup to be able to use the E85 fuel, and planting more trees.
Sounds like some good stuff, I haven't done enough reading on the geothermal system but I have to use fertilizer because I live in Georiga and there is no nutrience in clay but I use organic lawn care items. My parents just put in solar for their electric system in their house. If I have the opportunity to move somewhere I can make those investments, I think they would be great.
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Old 03-19-2008, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Chino, CA
1,458 posts, read 3,283,607 times
Reputation: 557
To have less impact on the environment, we've:
- used cloth bags at the supermarket
- use natural/bio degradable cleaning products
- switch out most of our lights to compact fluorescents (but, i hear this actually may be bad in the long term since they contain mercury? and are bio-hazards for disposal?)
- drive a hybrid car
- take the train to work occasionally
- energy efficient washer/dryer/refrigerator
- recycle papers/ bottles/ cans, etc. (although we're trying to lean away from bottled water)
- don't turn on the heater much when it's cold (bundle up)
- don't turn on the A/C as much when it's hot (dress down)
- load up the dishwasher

-chuck22b
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Old 03-19-2008, 01:41 PM
 
8,862 posts, read 17,483,637 times
Reputation: 2280
Quote:
Originally Posted by Georgia to Northeast PA View Post
Sounds like some good stuff, I haven't done enough reading on the geothermal system but I have to use fertilizer because I live in Georiga and there is no nutrience in clay but I use organic lawn care items. My parents just put in solar for their electric system in their house. If I have the opportunity to move somewhere I can make those investments, I think they would be great.
FWIW--

If you listen to Walter Reeves, GA Gardener, he also says the quality of potting soil/non organic is void of nutrients. IIRC, a lot of the soil sold in big bags comes from a drained swamp in FL.

That really got me because I thought I was enriching the clay. The local manure giveaway was this past Saturday--lines were long so I turned back.

Last year's tomatoes were very acidic and I prefer them to be sweeter. That might be a problem with the plant, not the soil. 'Learn by doing.'
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Old 03-19-2008, 01:49 PM
 
182 posts, read 450,751 times
Reputation: 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by TakeAhike View Post
FWIW--

If you listen to Walter Reeves, GA Gardener, he also says the quality of potting soil/non organic is void of nutrients. IIRC, a lot of the soil sold in big bags comes from a drained swamp in FL.

That really got me because I thought I was enriching the clay. The local manure giveaway was this past Saturday--lines were long so I turned back.

Last year's tomatoes were very acidic and I prefer them to be sweeter. That might be a problem with the plant, not the soil. 'Learn by doing.'
yes, I have seen the Georgia Gardener but I use organic products and I do also believe you learn by doing. I like worm poop and if you are in Georgia Nematodes for those lovely june bugs Home Depot has some good items and I get some of my stuff from Arbico Organics online.
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Old 03-19-2008, 03:20 PM
 
Location: PA
5,562 posts, read 5,681,868 times
Reputation: 1962
I must say I completey think most of you Greenies are crazy but at aleast in this thread you haven't asked for more government programs and taxes. You are all taking your own personal INDIVIDUAL responsiblity which I think is truly American. Once you cost the line and start to regulate thru government and carbon tax me I think I will change my tune. :-)

Psst global warming is not from humans.... because if it wasnt from humans the government couldn't tax you and find more ways to run your life.
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Old 03-19-2008, 09:29 PM
 
4,739 posts, read 10,438,277 times
Reputation: 4191
I get out my chainsaw and cut down shrubs in public parks. Then I paint the stumps with plant-killing hormones.

Yep, invasive Chinese privet threatens park-protected wetlands and we volunteers cut it down and paint stumps with a RoundUp / paint mixture...
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Old 03-19-2008, 10:51 PM
 
Location: Pinal County, Arizona
25,100 posts, read 39,254,467 times
Reputation: 4937
In our area, re-cycling is not an option

We recently completed building our new home and we wanted to go "green" as much as possible. In keeping with our hopes we:

1) The entire exterior of the home (walls) are real adobe bricks / blocks that were made on site

2) Although we have a pool and spa, we installed solar water heaters for both.

3) We installed solar panels / system that generates pretty much all of our electrical needs for the entire home. We are hoping that we will be able to produce excess energy that can be sold back to the power company.

4) There is no carpet in the home - concrete or rock floors - which reduce the amount of heat and/or Air Conditioning needed

5) We are in the desert - all landscaping is desert type landscape requiring very little water to maintain. No grass installed.
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