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Old 07-30-2013, 07:57 AM
 
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Fascinating. I always thought truffles were a European thing. So is there a chance I could have some in my yard? (woods). Are they that rare? Are they hard or do they squish like mushrooms?
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Old 07-30-2013, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sophiasmommy View Post
Yup, I corrected it. Thanks. I've done a ton of research over the past few years and they do grow wild here in the Blue Ridge side of SC and NC.
I haven't done a ton of research, but white truffles - the expensive kind used in culinary applications - are supposed to only grow in Italy.

So, I just spent a few minutes looking into it on the Google. And white truffles do grow in the Piedmont...of Italy. Apparently a few people have had success growing them in N. Cal as well, but not here.

What you have might are Pecan Truffles. It's really impossible to tell much from those pics. Pecan truffles grow here. They are earthy, edible, and common (i.e. not expensive).

Pecan Truffles FAQs | Commodities | Fruits & Vegetbles at CAES | UGA

I love truffles, by the way. The good ones you get at restaurants and occasionally at the store.

If you really have a person look at what you have and can ID them, get the latin name. That clears up all confusion.

Last edited by Art123; 07-30-2013 at 08:33 AM..
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Old 07-30-2013, 10:46 AM
 
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Honestly they just look like puffballs to me. Pull it out of the ground, cut it open, then post better quality pics.
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Old 07-30-2013, 01:17 PM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
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Since they're on the surface, my guess is puffballs ...they'll go dark inside when the innards are converting to spores. They depend on critters digging them up to spread their spores (rather than wind like the puffball) so true truffles aren't found on the surface.

Many puffballs are edible, but as I recall there are some that are dodgy, and if you pick an immature amanita by mistake (gill mushrooms look like puffballs when they first burst out of the earth) you might find yourself in the hospital or worse so I personally wouldn't risk it. Fungi are notoriously hard to identify, and they fall into the categories: safe unless you're allergic; probably safe; might be safe; will probably make you sick; better have your last will and testament prepared if you eat this one.
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Old 07-30-2013, 04:22 PM
 
Location: Greenville
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Pigs are great for hunting out truffles. Truffle hog - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia SEE...
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Old 07-30-2013, 07:53 PM
 
5,999 posts, read 7,096,453 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Art123 View Post
I haven't done a ton of research, but white truffles - the expensive kind used in culinary applications - are supposed to only grow in Italy.

So, I just spent a few minutes looking into it on the Google. And white truffles do grow in the Piedmont...of Italy. Apparently a few people have had success growing them in N. Cal as well, but not here.

What you have might are Pecan Truffles. It's really impossible to tell much from those pics. Pecan truffles grow here. They are earthy, edible, and common (i.e. not expensive).

Pecan Truffles FAQs | Commodities | Fruits & Vegetbles at CAES | UGA

I love truffles, by the way. The good ones you get at restaurants and occasionally at the store.

If you really have a person look at what you have and can ID them, get the latin name. That clears up all confusion.
Thanks Art, that was a very informative link.
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Old 07-30-2013, 07:54 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vasily View Post
Since they're on the surface, my guess is puffballs ...they'll go dark inside when the innards are converting to spores. They depend on critters digging them up to spread their spores (rather than wind like the puffball) so true truffles aren't found on the surface.

Many puffballs are edible, but as I recall there are some that are dodgy, and if you pick an immature amanita by mistake (gill mushrooms look like puffballs when they first burst out of the earth) you might find yourself in the hospital or worse so I personally wouldn't risk it. Fungi are notoriously hard to identify, and they fall into the categories: safe unless you're allergic; probably safe; might be safe; will probably make you sick; better have your last will and testament prepared if you eat this one.
They're not on the surface, they're semi submerged, but due to rain and erosion, they have been exposed. Puffballs have stems and/or stalks and are above ground.
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Old 07-30-2013, 09:27 PM
 
Location: Somewhere, out there in Zone7B
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Reading your post reminded me of a story I saw when I first moved here (seems you saw this post too):

S. Carolina's 1st Trufferie is Open near Landrum

I would ask them.

I have seen some funky mushrooms popping up in my yard recently. I wouldn't touch a single one, even with my neighbor who had a book in hand and studied about mushrooms in school. I found little red ones, some black mottled ones and ones that look like leather, just to name a few. There's been more oddities this year than before.

Gosh, there are some beautiful mushrooms out there!

http://www.fungiphoto.com/CTLG/a_sys/C.clr.html
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Old 08-01-2013, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
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If it's soft, it's a puffball. Truffles have hard or leathery exteriors. They grow completely underground though they may be exposed by animals digging around, and grow on the roots of symbiotic tree species (but not cedar or maple). Also be aware that there are false truffles out there:

False Truffle – Identification | Walter Reeves: The Georgia Gardener

Some species of mushrooms are easier to identify than others; for example, morels ... But there are false morels, and I've seen them fool less experienced mushroom hunters. There are some that can only be identified under a microscope.

Best rules of thumb: if there's any doubt, leave it alone. And if you don't have a firm grasp on the art of mushroom identification, get your mushrooms at the grocery store.
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Old 08-01-2013, 07:36 PM
 
5,999 posts, read 7,096,453 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vasily View Post
If it's soft, it's a puffball. Truffles have hard or leathery exteriors. They grow completely underground though they may be exposed by animals digging around, and grow on the roots of symbiotic tree species (but not cedar or maple). Also be aware that there are false truffles out there:

False Truffle – Identification | Walter Reeves: The Georgia Gardener

Some species of mushrooms are easier to identify than others; for example, morels ... But there are false morels, and I've seen them fool less experienced mushroom hunters. There are some that can only be identified under a microscope.

Best rules of thumb: if there's any doubt, leave it alone. And if you don't have a firm grasp on the art of mushroom identification, get your mushrooms at the grocery store.
Thanks for the link, as I stated in my op, they were already identified as truffles by Chef Mark of GTC Culinary Academy. I have zero knowledge about the types though and I was wrong, I think the link that Art provided is the best one so far, they ones we have most resemble them. There is no stalk and the only reason we saw them was due to soil erosion because of all of the rain and the location of the tree near our house; but alas, the truffles will be no more as we had the tree cut down today and the side of the lawn graded and french drains put in to eliminate the flooding and seepage under our foundation. Good bye tree, goodbye mystery truffles; you will be missed.
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