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Old 01-02-2013, 06:55 PM
 
Location: Portsmouth, VA
6,513 posts, read 7,185,526 times
Reputation: 3765

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Quote:
Originally Posted by 757Cities Southsider View Post
Oh I get what you are saying about what people are "meaning to say" by saying "Northern", thats the problem. The average person doesnt really know what they are talking about. You are right, we ARE fighting ignorance. Generalizations and stigma clouds peoples judgement of reality.
Speaking of ignorance, when I was in college in the dorms one night we were watching Cooley High. Some girl from Baltimore assumed the film was shot in New York because there were high rises. Once corrected, she stated she didn't think they had high rises outside of the East Coast. Just kept my mouth shut, hung my head, and placed my face in my palm.



People only know what they care to know. There are high rises everywhere, not just Chicago and New York. Reminds me of people that want skyscrapers to be built in their city, just because, without any respect for the cost of those skyscrapers and what type of foot traffic it takes to keep the lights on in those places. Unless the area continues to grow, those skyscrapers will inevitably be torn down, in some cases replaced with smaller buildings, in other cases they just disappear altogether. Anyone can look at a city like Detroit and sees what happens to skyscrapers that are no longer needed.
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Old 01-03-2013, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Hampton Roads, VA.
867 posts, read 1,228,756 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
Speaking of ignorance, when I was in college in the dorms one night we were watching Cooley High. Some girl from Baltimore assumed the film was shot in New York because there were high rises. Once corrected, she stated she didn't think they had high rises outside of the East Coast. Just kept my mouth shut, hung my head, and placed my face in my palm.



People only know what they care to know. There are high rises everywhere, not just Chicago and New York. Reminds me of people that want skyscrapers to be built in their city, just because, without any respect for the cost of those skyscrapers and what type of foot traffic it takes to keep the lights on in those places. Unless the area continues to grow, those skyscrapers will inevitably be torn down, in some cases replaced with smaller buildings, in other cases they just disappear altogether. Anyone can look at a city like Detroit and sees what happens to skyscrapers that are no longer needed.
Shheeesh, I guess she must have been a byproduct of Charm City's public school teacher shortage...that is hard to believe...then again some people hate to be wrong and corrrected and start babelling even dumber ish when they are.

As far as those skyscraper worshippin nit wits...I cant tell you how annoying some of those people are, especially on UP. I have told myself they are either teenagers or people who are surburbanites dreaming about bragging about how theyre from the "big city" as if that will make THEM cool. LMAO. Im all for growing the skyline and all, but the character of the city you live in is much more important than some lifeless highrises. Norfolk could stand to use a good 700fter over in the Atlantic City section but it would probably have to be hotel/residence...who's gonna take the risk on that one in this economy?
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Old 01-05-2013, 05:21 PM
 
371 posts, read 860,009 times
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I have another question for y'all. I was reading that many slums once covered a large percentage of Norfolk before they were torn down and the areas were converted into public housing (parks). Also, there was a section of the city called Atlantic City that was torn down and now is basically the site of EVMS and the hospital. I know that a large amount of downtown and church street was torn down, but were other sections of the city drastically changed/torn down as well, such as the Huntersville area, Park Place, and Tidewater Drive/Lafayette area?
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Old 01-06-2013, 05:38 AM
 
Location: Hampton Roads, VA.
867 posts, read 1,228,756 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kbank007 View Post
I have another question for y'all. I was reading that many slums once covered a large percentage of Norfolk before they were torn down and the areas were converted into public housing (parks). Also, there was a section of the city called Atlantic City that was torn down and now is basically the site of EVMS and the hospital. I know that a large amount of downtown and church street was torn down, but were other sections of the city drastically changed/torn down as well, such as the Huntersville area, Park Place, and Tidewater Drive/Lafayette area?
Atlantic City also runs into Freemason if I remeber correctly, they call it Fort Norfolk now, and theres a high rise there called Riverview(I think), nice building. I like the name Atlantic City myself...or Atlantic something...Fort Norfolk just sounds less exciting(corny) to me. Yes but, AC was actually on waterfront property, only back then thats were people worked at off the wharfs and warehouses. The whole DT is known to flood just so you know...which could also have something to do with why the poor were left in those areas (I am including Ghent before its redevelopement)...now its prime real estate they say, nice lookin though.

Ok lets see...behind NSU on Merrimac, those houses you see used to be the sight of the oldest public housing in the area I think. The current Public Housing downtown looks far better in comparison. The neighborhood that replaced Liberty Park is called Middletown Arch. I wouldve preferred more brick and taller trees, but hey.

Down Merrimac onto the Blvd. onto Ballentine youll see that Broad Creek foolishness over there with the artificial pond. That used to be Bowling Park, btw when I say "Park" I mean housing projects. I do not like the name Broad Creek or the spacing and architecture of those buildings...or the layout in general.

Go further down Ballentine make a left on Princess Anne and everything on your right side after Spartan Market and Before Mc Donalds was where Roberts ParK was at. When doing projects like these the city needs to learn to keep the old tall trees, as they add character to neighborhoods.
Where you see Misson College and that mid rise; that used to be Marshall Manor (and ugly Park known as Bedrock). Back back in the back of that and in between RP was Moton Park. I really didnt see a need to tear down Moton. Most people never seen or heard of it. And the trees were nice...people were just poor, shame. Those projects looked better than the shiny new crap they are replacing them with. The rest of that side of PA on down to TW Dr. has been slowly torn down as the homes are old and blighted in Old Huntersville/Bruce Park(actual name and not a project).

Left on Park Ave all the way to Brambleton passed NSU was/is a Neighborhood called Brambleton, now it is riddled with vinyl siding crap. The Brambleton Ave. side (South Brambleton) has almost been totally destroyed and probably bought up by NSU...as I see they have placed an off kiltered building on the side with the Tide stop. Why that RISE building is angled like that makes you wonder.

Because Norfolk is so old,there are many more places naturally, those are the ones I could think of real quick.
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Old 01-06-2013, 06:13 AM
 
Location: Portsmouth, VA
6,513 posts, read 7,185,526 times
Reputation: 3765
Quote:
Originally Posted by 757Cities Southsider View Post
Shheeesh, I guess she must have been a byproduct of Charm City's public school teacher shortage...that is hard to believe...then again some people hate to be wrong and corrrected and start babelling even dumber ish when they are.

As far as those skyscraper worshippin nit wits...I cant tell you how annoying some of those people are, especially on UP. I have told myself they are either teenagers or people who are surburbanites dreaming about bragging about how theyre from the "big city" as if that will make THEM cool. LMAO. Im all for growing the skyline and all, but the character of the city you live in is much more important than some lifeless highrises. Norfolk could stand to use a good 700fter over in the Atlantic City section but it would probably have to be hotel/residence...who's gonna take the risk on that one in this economy?
Not many. Was just reading about Manhattanization; a term they applied toward the boom in San Francisco in the 70s, then again in Miami back in '08. Guess Miami went into a boom and they built like 50 high rises within a couple of years. In San Francisco it was inevitable because of land shortages. Now Dade County really does have a land shortage, and there is a moratorium on building.

There is too much land in Norfolk for that to happen. We'll see a high rise here and there but nothing like what happened in those two cities, in such a short period of time.
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Old 01-06-2013, 06:19 AM
 
Location: Portsmouth, VA
6,513 posts, read 7,185,526 times
Reputation: 3765
Quote:
Originally Posted by 757Cities Southsider View Post
Atlantic City also runs into Freemason if I remeber correctly, they call it Fort Norfolk now, and theres a high rise there called Riverview(I think), nice building. I like the name Atlantic City myself...or Atlantic something...Fort Norfolk just sounds less exciting(corny) to me. Yes but, AC was actually on waterfront property, only back then thats were people worked at off the wharfs and warehouses. The whole DT is known to flood just so you know...which could also have something to do with why the poor were left in those areas (I am including Ghent before its redevelopement)...now its prime real estate they say, nice lookin though.

Ok lets see...behind NSU on Merrimac, those houses you see used to be the sight of the oldest public housing in the area I think. The current Public Housing downtown looks far better in comparison. The neighborhood that replaced Liberty Park is called Middletown Arch. I wouldve preferred more brick and taller trees, but hey.

Down Merrimac onto the Blvd. onto Ballentine youll see that Broad Creek foolishness over there with the artificial pond. That used to be Bowling Park, btw when I say "Park" I mean housing projects. I do not like the name Broad Creek or the spacing and architecture of those buildings...or the layout in general.

Go further down Ballentine make a left on Princess Anne and everything on your right side after Spartan Market and Before Mc Donalds was where Roberts ParK was at. When doing projects like these the city needs to learn to keep the old tall trees, as they add character to neighborhoods.
Where you see Misson College and that mid rise; that used to be Marshall Manor (and ugly Park known as Bedrock). Back back in the back of that and in between RP was Moton Park. I really didnt see a need to tear down Moton. Most people never seen or heard of it. And the trees were nice...people were just poor, shame. Those projects looked better than the shiny new crap they are replacing them with. The rest of that side of PA on down to TW Dr. has been slowly torn down as the homes are old and blighted in Old Huntersville/Bruce Park(actual name and not a project).

Left on Park Ave all the way to Brambleton passed NSU was/is a Neighborhood called Brambleton, now it is riddled with vinyl siding crap. The Brambleton Ave. side (South Brambleton) has almost been totally destroyed and probably bought up by NSU...as I see they have placed an off kiltered building on the side with the Tide stop. Why that RISE building is angled like that makes you wonder.

Because Norfolk is so old,there are many more places naturally, those are the ones I could think of real quick.
They may have been thinking about Fort Lee and some other areas in that part of New Jersey that borders Manhattan. Those areas are even more urban and densely populated than parts of New York. Might be the reason they call it Fort Norfolk.
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Old 01-06-2013, 02:58 PM
 
Location: Hampton Roads, VA.
867 posts, read 1,228,756 times
Reputation: 632
Quote:
Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
Not many. Was just reading about Manhattanization; a term they applied toward the boom in San Francisco in the 70s, then again in Miami back in '08. Guess Miami went into a boom and they built like 50 high rises within a couple of years. In San Francisco it was inevitable because of land shortages. Now Dade County really does have a land shortage, and there is a moratorium on building.

There is too much land in Norfolk for that to happen. We'll see a high rise here and there but nothing like what happened in those two cities, in such a short period of time.
Thats interesting about Miami, if 50 high rises went up that fast. I had always heard that "coke" built Miami, that and tourism.
Norfolk really doesnt have that much land available as it is boxed in by water and neighboring cities. I dont expect to see the growth of Miami (nor do I want it) but smart growth could work better for us. Id have them finish that Spectrum at Willoughby on that side of the city while working on bulding a Granby Tower like project in Atlantic City. It is the best waterfront view in the city so the building would have to be maximum height IMO; surrounded by other scaled down highrises on into midrise communities with walkable "exclusive" restaurants...and marinas of course.

Quote:
Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
They may have been thinking about Fort Lee and some other areas in that part of New Jersey that borders Manhattan. Those areas are even more urban and densely populated than parts of New York. Might be the reason they call it Fort Norfolk.
I think they call it Fort Norfolk because Fort Norfolk was located in that area. Fort Norfolk was a Fort constructed there on the banks of the Elizabeth in the 1700s and damaged during the American Revolution...there might be some remnant of the structure in that area.
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Old 01-08-2013, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Portsmouth, VA
6,513 posts, read 7,185,526 times
Reputation: 3765
Quote:
Originally Posted by 757Cities Southsider View Post
Thats interesting about Miami, if 50 high rises went up that fast. I had always heard that "coke" built Miami, that and tourism.
Norfolk really doesnt have that much land available as it is boxed in by water and neighboring cities. I dont expect to see the growth of Miami (nor do I want it) but smart growth could work better for us. Id have them finish that Spectrum at Willoughby on that side of the city while working on bulding a Granby Tower like project in Atlantic City. It is the best waterfront view in the city so the building would have to be maximum height IMO; surrounded by other scaled down highrises on into midrise communities with walkable "exclusive" restaurants...and marinas of course.

I think they call it Fort Norfolk because Fort Norfolk was located in that area. Fort Norfolk was a Fort constructed there on the banks of the Elizabeth in the 1700s and damaged during the American Revolution...there might be some remnant of the structure in that area.
Norfolk will rise again. Might take a bit longer than usual, but Downtown Norfolk is far from dead.
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Old 01-08-2013, 07:18 PM
 
Location: Hampton Roads, VA.
867 posts, read 1,228,756 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
Norfolk will rise again. Might take a bit longer than usual, but Downtown Norfolk is far from dead.
Yes yes I know it will rise, it most certainly is not dead. I love the view coming in from West Norfolk through the Midtown then up Brambleton. So much more can be done. Norfolk tight for real, I just wish the Feds didnt kill Granby Tower. Seems like there should be something that can be done about that.
But yes, there is plenty of space to build UP in DT.
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Old 01-09-2013, 07:15 AM
 
275 posts, read 823,324 times
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Downtown Norfolk has its phases...it was hot in the mid-to-late-2000s, then Town Center started taking some of its thunder, and now it's slowly coming back. Far from dead, or even life support, just in a bit of a lull.

The Granby Tower and Westin projects would've been nice; the former is being heavily reconsidered with the Waterside renovations coming into play. That won't necessarily be a game changer, but it definitely helps bring traffic back to the city (and business district).

Downtown Norfolk had some really nice plans for towers a few years ago...unfortunately, they were proposed when the economy went straight into the toilet, so naturally most of them fell through, except for the Wells Fargo Tower across from Scope. 10 years ago, it wouldn't have been a problem, but with the slowly recovering economy, things are looking good. The new courthouse will be another nice one.

There's been some talk about the "St. Paul Quadrant", which would go off Tidewater Dr., across from Ruffner Middle. That would be nice to see, but the city (as always) is dragging its feet with that one. I think that and the other side of Brambleton are the future of downtown Norfolk with it being so landlocked. Would love to see more restaurants next to Harbor Park as well...a riverwalk leading all the way to Waterside.
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