U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Pennsylvania > Harrisburg area
 [Register]
Harrisburg area Cumberland, Dauphin, and Perry Counties
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 09-30-2018, 07:59 AM
 
6 posts, read 5,484 times
Reputation: 10

Advertisements

Hi all!
My husband and I are searching for a place to move to in PA (and my parents will follow). We are currently in Fl and they are in CO. I am a native New Yorker so I am comfortable with the northern climate, hate the heat down here!
Our kids are grown so schools are not an issue but we both need access to an airport for semi-frequent travel (I work remotely but need to travel to NYC every couple of months and my husband has a business in Florida still).
Another concern is we do not want any area that is too conservative, we are liberal and non-religious and prefer a live and let live vibe.
My husband spent several years on a project in Lancaster Co. and loved it and I have been reading a lot about Lancaster of late and it sounds great. Here are my survey answers:
When are you moving?

Where are you coming from? Florida and Co
Why are you moving? Want four seasons, miss the Northeast
Where will you be working? Remote
Have you been here yet? Yes (hubby) Me as a child

Will you buy or rent? Buy
If buying, are you looking for a house or a condo? How much can you spend? House, up to ~$400k

Are you married or single? Do you have children? Married, grown children

Do you have pets? yes
Do you want or need a yard? yes
Are you keeping a car? yes
Do you prefer bustling activity or calm and quiet? quiet for house

What do you want to be closest to? Within an hour of an airport if possible
Work
Shopping - prefer local vendors
Basic services (supermarket, drugstore, etc.): Close to grocery and basic ameneties
Nightlife - don't care
Train or subway stations - close to Amtrak would be great

Do you want to live with people of a similar age, race, religion or sexual preference or do you prefer a diverse neighborhood? As stated above, want a liberal mindset
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-30-2018, 06:48 PM
 
Location: Alexandria, VA
12,597 posts, read 22,515,348 times
Reputation: 19456
Liberal mindset? Have you done ANY research on Lancaster? - Do a search on this forum alone.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-30-2018, 10:21 PM
 
1,189 posts, read 2,650,069 times
Reputation: 929
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flamingo13 View Post
Liberal mindset? Have you done ANY research on Lancaster? - Do a search on this forum alone.
LOL, seriously. It's one of the most conservative/religious areas in PA, and not just due to the Amish and Mennonites.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-30-2018, 10:28 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
273 posts, read 198,548 times
Reputation: 724
^ The two above comments are typical of people who either don’t know Lancaster or whose knowledge of the city is a good few decades out of date.

The truth is that the City of Lancaster is quite a liberal place. Look at 2016 Presidential election results as a very rough guideline of political persuasion, and you’ll see that all of the city’s precincts voted Democratic by a wide margin—typically 70% or more, and some upwards of 90%. These numbers are as solidly blue as Greenwich Village or the campus of Harvard. And the city is also home to a progressive congressional candidate who’s actually pulling in respectable poll numbers and attracted the likes of Bernie Sanders to visit Lancaster to campaign for her.

It’s this Lancaster—the progressive, creative, independent Lancaster that lives within the city limits—that put the city on Forbes’ list of the 10 “Coolest Cities to Visit” and inspired a New York Post writer to describe the city as a “mini Brooklyn”.

But there is another very different “Lancaster”, though—in suburban townships outside of the bounds of the city. Suburban Lancaster is 180° out of phase with the city in all regards. This is a place of tacky faux-Amish tourist traps, cookie-cutter suburban homes, big box shops, and megachurches. Some of the inhabitants of the suburbs are middle-of-the road, moderate people, but as you go further out into farmlands, they generally become more conservative (politically) and more devout (religiously). And in my experience, many of these suburbanites never go into the city, couldn’t care less about it, and are filled with all kinds of prejudices and misinformation they’re carrying around from the ’80s and earlier. So if you’re city folk—you’ll rarely if ever encounter these people.

Perhaps the only downside I’m seeing based on your post is proximity to an airport. In one sense, Lancaster is in a great location because it’s about an hour and change on the train or by car to Philadelphia, and it’s just under three hours (again by train or car) to New York. But the closest commercial airport (Harrisburg), though a convenient size, doesn’t offer direct flights to many destinations. The nearest major airports (Philadelphia or Baltimore) would be inconvenient to get to (about 90 minutes, driving) if you fly often.

But if you can get past the airport issue, think you can live with the moderate distance to Philadelphia and New York, and find a home within the city limits that you think you’ll like, Lancaster might be an ideal place to live. If Lancaster’s newfound “hip” factor matters to you, you’re certainly getting it for a much lower price there than you’d pay in a similar hip and progressive suburb of Philadelphia (like Media, West Chester, Doylestown, etc.) or part of the city itself.

I hope this information if helpful to you. Let me know if you have any questions. Good luck!
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-01-2018, 06:21 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
1,906 posts, read 1,093,184 times
Reputation: 1949
Quote:
Originally Posted by briantroutman View Post
^ The two above comments are typical of people who either don’t know Lancaster or whose knowledge of the city is a good few decades out of date.

The truth is that the City of Lancaster is quite a liberal place. Look at 2016 Presidential election results as a very rough guideline of political persuasion, and you’ll see that all of the city’s precincts voted Democratic by a wide margin—typically 70% or more, and some upwards of 90%. These numbers are as solidly blue as Greenwich Village or the campus of Harvard. And the city is also home to a progressive congressional candidate who’s actually pulling in respectable poll numbers and attracted the likes of Bernie Sanders to visit Lancaster to campaign for her.

It’s this Lancaster—the progressive, creative, independent Lancaster that lives within the city limits—that put the city on Forbes’ list of the 10 “Coolest Cities to Visit” and inspired a New York Post writer to describe the city as a “mini Brooklyn”.

But there is another very different “Lancaster”, though—in suburban townships outside of the bounds of the city. Suburban Lancaster is 180° out of phase with the city in all regards. This is a place of tacky faux-Amish tourist traps, cookie-cutter suburban homes, big box shops, and megachurches. Some of the inhabitants of the suburbs are middle-of-the road, moderate people, but as you go further out into farmlands, they generally become more conservative (politically) and more devout (religiously). And in my experience, many of these suburbanites never go into the city, couldn’t care less about it, and are filled with all kinds of prejudices and misinformation they’re carrying around from the ’80s and earlier. So if you’re city folk—you’ll rarely if ever encounter these people.

Perhaps the only downside I’m seeing based on your post is proximity to an airport. In one sense, Lancaster is in a great location because it’s about an hour and change on the train or by car to Philadelphia, and it’s just under three hours (again by train or car) to New York. But the closest commercial airport (Harrisburg), though a convenient size, doesn’t offer direct flights to many destinations. The nearest major airports (Philadelphia or Baltimore) would be inconvenient to get to (about 90 minutes, driving) if you fly often.

But if you can get past the airport issue, think you can live with the moderate distance to Philadelphia and New York, and find a home within the city limits that you think you’ll like, Lancaster might be an ideal place to live. If Lancaster’s newfound “hip” factor matters to you, you’re certainly getting it for a much lower price there than you’d pay in a similar hip and progressive suburb of Philadelphia (like Media, West Chester, Doylestown, etc.) or part of the city itself.

I hope this information if helpful to you. Let me know if you have any questions. Good luck!
This is an excellent recommendation I agree with EVERYTHING stated above and I highly recommend Lancaster. The city of Lancaster is quite progressive as described, and the architecturially beauty and character truly is some of the best in the USA.

Also note Franklin and Marshall, a highly notable liberal arts college is located within the city and a large state university; Millersville University is just 10 minutes or so from the city, so there is a healthy youthful and progressive/creative culture within the city.

Amtrak service is utmost convenient as Lancaster to Philadelphia is just shy over 60 minutes with and is directly connected to NYC. The Keystone Line is actually one of the busiest Amtrak routes in the USA.

Harrisburg International is conveniently located close to Lancaster, but does require a connection for most flights.

You can take Amtrak to Philadelphia and then board a SEPTA train directly to the airport, but your total travel time will probably be around the 90 minute mark. (so either way you will have an extension of travel time).

400k is a healthy budget in Lancaster.

Based on that budget I would also suggest the areas around West Chester, PA. If you are seeking closer proximity to the airport. Southeast Pennsylvania Real Estate has gotten pricey, so 400k wont go as far as it once did.

Cheers!
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-01-2018, 07:18 PM
 
4,267 posts, read 10,383,735 times
Reputation: 3840
The only thing I could add to the last two posts is that wanting an appreciable size yard for pets might bring about sticker shock. Lots tend to be smaller in southeast PA than in much of the rest of the country. Lancaster does at least have some single houses within the relatively liberal city limits but you might still be parking a car on the street if you have two. If you don't want people poking into your business and damning you to hell, stay in the city limits or very close on the west/F&M side.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-02-2018, 07:36 AM
 
6 posts, read 5,484 times
Reputation: 10
Wow, what great information. Thank you! We started our search in Southeast PA but were having trouble finding a decent yard. I'm not sure we want to be in the city proper, however. We LOVED West Chester when we visited but Chester Co. taxes seemed a little high so we are also exploring Bucks. Doylestown area we really liked as well. It looks like Lehigh Valley wouldn't be bad and I could still commute to PHL or Lehigh Valley airport maybe. It's very difficult deciding where to spend the rest of your life from so far away. This forum is so helpful and I really appreciate all of your input!
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-02-2018, 08:26 AM
 
1,189 posts, read 2,650,069 times
Reputation: 929
Quote:
Originally Posted by briantroutman View Post
^ The two above comments are typical of people who either don’t know Lancaster or whose knowledge of the city is a good few decades out of date.

The truth is that the City of Lancaster is quite a liberal place.
The OP is looking to buy a single family house with a yard in a quiet area with a price up to 400k. Not exactly what one usually looks to find in the city itself, which yes, is much more liberal than the suburban townships. If they can find such a house in the city, the yard will be small and the house will be very old.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-03-2018, 05:26 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
1,906 posts, read 1,093,184 times
Reputation: 1949
You might also want to check out New Hope, Pennsylvania in Bucks County. Upper Bucks County is a wonderland of absolute beauty. New Hope is an extremely vibrant town as it attracts a well to do and progressive crowd from Philadelphia and NYC.

The surrounding area is just breathtaking in colonial beauty.

And you are close enough to two of the largest east coast cities to easily enjoy both for the day, but then take your respite to the country of upper bucks.

Here is a video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=f_D6pDgRyAg

You will be at under 60 minutes to Philadelphia International and about 1hr25m to Newark.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-04-2018, 07:24 AM
 
584 posts, read 251,717 times
Reputation: 2082
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnZ963 View Post
The OP is looking to buy a single family house with a yard in a quiet area with a price up to 400k. Not exactly what one usually looks to find in the city itself, which yes, is much more liberal than the suburban townships. If they can find such a house in the city, the yard will be small and the house will be very old.
As a resident of Lancaster COUNTY, I can't state strongly enough that the concept of a "liberal Lancaster" ENDS at the city's borders. I live in a great small town, a few miles from Lancaster city, my neighborhood fits the housing requirements of the OP, and I am surrounded by some of the most radical conservatives you could ever imagine. I'm talking about middle aged parents that are completely willing to break ties with their adult children over things like the child's support of tolerance and diversity, as expressed by their children's church provided "we welcome all in our home" yard signs, during the whole Trump Muslim ban debacle. About 60-70% of the "English" or non plain sect residents here, are extremely conservative, and very quiet and discrete about it. Most on my block are regular church attendees, subtly racist, and would rather die that vote for a dem. I literally have older neighbors who view Trump as some sort of blessing from God, and will not even allow a negative thought of their Presidential Messiah to enter their heads. That BTW, is NOT a political statement, it's a fact.

That said, as a liberal, one of the 30% or so of the left leaning folks in this county, I LOVE living here. I wouldn't want to be anywhere else.

Last edited by wharton; 10-04-2018 at 08:09 AM..
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Pennsylvania > Harrisburg area

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top