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Harrisburg area Cumberland, Dauphin, and Perry Counties
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Old 04-20-2021, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
2,441 posts, read 1,359,957 times
Reputation: 2467

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Quote:
Originally Posted by wharton View Post
I found it amusing that somebody would make a snarkly comment, directing you to "stay in your lane" regarding your knowledge. Having read your stuff for years, I'm pretty confident that you know this state better than many of our state's officials do.

The only thing I would add is that it's easy to tour Lancaster city and the immediate surroundings and not see it as an manufacturing powerhouse. It's only when you get to other areas of the county, from the edges of New Holland and Lititz, to all kinds of rural areas, do you get the whole picture. It's really an unusual place, It's nothing to go from one small city in PA, to another, and see the residential sprawl thin out, then the farmlands and forest, then a reverse as you get closer to your destination. Having never passed anything in the way of a manufacturing facility. Here you can take back roads from one small town to another, and end up passing everything from large medical equipment, structural steel, precast concrete, food, and other manufacturers, to dozens of medium to large shed building factories, farm equipment manufacturers of all sizes, etc..

The local paper does a report of the county's business health, ever year. It's a mind blowing read of exactly how far the county punches above it's weight. Everything from being the location of one of the largest bridge builders on the east coast, to manufacturing tens of thousands of custom play structures (upscale swingsets) to billions in food production, it's not only pretty amazing, it's also insanely diverse.

Yes you are correct 100%.

Lancaster County does have a significant manufacturing base that is more decentralized throughout the county but is very very strong.

Heck... few people know Tait Studios is located in Litiz, Pennsylvania and is considered to be one of the world's most renowned production studios where the likes from Lady Gaga, U2, Katy Perry and more big names use for their concert production tours and studio stages.

I appreciate your insight on reading my posts on city data. I have family who live all over Pennsylvania and I take great pride in knowing the state in and out.

The only part of Pennsylvania I have not visited is Erie... (Its crazy to think Boston is closer to me than Erie is)...

Heck I think North Carolina is almost the same distance from Philadelphia as Erie is...

With that... Lancaster City and County have done a fantastic job of:

1) Preserving Open Space and Farmland
2) Minimizing Sprawl - Although it has increased slightly
3) Having a Countywide Master Plan for growth
4) Focusing on Downtown Lancaster as the "Anchor" to the County


Harrisburg is also doing a lot...

It is a bit behind Lancaster... mostly because it is decentralized as its suburban area is split between two counties (Dauphin and Cumberland) that typically do not like to work together and think as a region..

But there is a record number of building permits in Harrisburg City itself right now and so I see tons of potential.

Lancaster and Harrisburg are definitely the anchors of the "Susquehanna Valley"...

I like how WGAL8 refers to the region as the "Susquehanna Valley" and I think it should be branded under that name officially, rather than calling it Central PA.. which sounds bland, boring and dull, and what most non innovative entities title it as...


If the region wants to grow and attract business and talent it needs to up its marketing a bit.. which WGAL8 has branded the region well and it should be adopted throughout.

York is not a bad area per say. Its downtown is historic and charming. Its economy though is definitely the smallest and least diverse.. It does have a small share of people who commute to Baltimore but that number is less than 10%.


Southeast Pennsylvania
Lehigh Valley
Susquehanna Valley
State College

Are the rising stars of the state right now.


Pittsburgh has some growing pains still in its larger metro with some of its old manufacturing towns... but as home prices continue to sky rocket, I see Pittsburgh's affordability combined with all its big city amenities really shoot the city to a new national level starting in the mid 2020s...

And with Pittsburgh International Airport improving its terminal with a $1B project and increasing its connectivity with one way flights... business and jobs will follow....

I even see some traction in the Pocono and Scranton region as well. There has been tons of growth and interest from New Yorkers and people from New Jersey to move to that area... for its more down to earth feel, open space, rural terrain and low col...

The Pocono Tourism organization does a good job... I think they are the second best tourism department in the state after Philadelphia's.

We Are....

Last edited by rowhomecity; 04-20-2021 at 11:24 AM..
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Old 05-11-2021, 10:54 AM
 
1,059 posts, read 862,765 times
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Wife and I were looking at row homes in Lancaster, and my wife being from Asia with so many cities being brand new, she asked what happens to all of these 100 to 200 year old row homes if nobody rehabs them? Does the city step in? I honestly could not give her an answer as I don't know either. Most of the homes in Lancaster City are very old row homes, and owners as well as recent flippers don't address structural issues with the properties. They basically put in a new kitchen, maybe redo flooring and replace an old tub and put in a new glass shower and paint the home to sell but what happens to these old homes over time?

We looked at 158 E Chestnut st to purchase, but we couldn't get our heads around how much money would be needed to repair the home in future years. The owner is a lawyer who hasn't done anything with the home for 26 years, and he bought it from a 90 year old woman who didn't do much with the home either. Now it's a 200 year old home. How long can this home withstand before it crumbles down? This is just one example.
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Old 05-12-2021, 07:43 AM
 
Location: Center City Philadelphia
200 posts, read 143,578 times
Reputation: 184
Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeinChina View Post
Wife and I were looking at row homes in Lancaster, and my wife being from Asia with so many cities being brand new, she asked what happens to all of these 100 to 200 year old row homes if nobody rehabs them? Does the city step in? I honestly could not give her an answer as I don't know either. Most of the homes in Lancaster City are very old row homes, and owners as well as recent flippers don't address structural issues with the properties. They basically put in a new kitchen, maybe redo flooring and replace an old tub and put in a new glass shower and paint the home to sell but what happens to these old homes over time?

We looked at 158 E Chestnut st to purchase, but we couldn't get our heads around how much money would be needed to repair the home in future years. The owner is a lawyer who hasn't done anything with the home for 26 years, and he bought it from a 90 year old woman who didn't do much with the home either. Now it's a 200 year old home. How long can this home withstand before it crumbles down? This is just one example.
It's always tough to tell with any home and you need a really good home inspector who understands the housing stock. I'll just say that many of the 100-year-old homes in my neighborhood are standing up *much* better than the houses built in the past 20, even 10 years.
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Old 05-13-2021, 11:21 AM
 
4,741 posts, read 4,308,559 times
Reputation: 4678
158 E. Chestnut St. is not a row house. It is not physically attached to any of its neighbors. Many older homes were very well built and able to last 100s of years. Many European homes are hundreds of years old.


From the photos, it doesn't look like 158 E. Chestnut is in need of a complete rehab. Just touching up here and there.


Have you looked at newer homes on large lots in Manheim Township?
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Old 05-18-2021, 01:03 PM
 
1,059 posts, read 862,765 times
Reputation: 1459
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wells5 View Post
158 E. Chestnut St. is not a row house. It is not physically attached to any of its neighbors. Many older homes were very well built and able to last 100s of years. Many European homes are hundreds of years old.


From the photos, it doesn't look like 158 E. Chestnut is in need of a complete rehab. Just touching up here and there.


Have you looked at newer homes on large lots in Manheim Township?
158 E Chestnut doesn't look bad from the pics on Zillow, but when you walk around and tour the property and building, it's in need a hundreds of thousands of dollars if you want to fix it up. Both owners over the last 40 years have done nothing to the home except for installing some ugly red kitchen 15 years ago that was done very cheaply.

It's tough to judge these older homes and not get a money pit. I don't mind putting in money each year, but I also don't want to continue to put in big money.
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Old 05-20-2021, 11:33 AM
 
4,741 posts, read 4,308,559 times
Reputation: 4678
Quote:
Originally Posted by wharton View Post

The local paper does a report of the county's business health, ever year. It's a mind blowing read of exactly how far the county punches above it's weight. Everything from being the location of one of the largest bridge builders on the east coast, to manufacturing tens of thousands of custom play structures (upscale swingsets) to billions in food production, it's not only pretty amazing, it's also insanely diverse.

Lancaster at one time had a number of RCA assembly plants, but RCA was bought by GE, which shut down production in the mid 1980s. It's still headquarters for Armstrong World Industries but they do no manufacturing in Lancaster. As to "bridge builders," Lancaster is home to "High Steel Structures," a steel fabricator but almost all of HSS's manufacturing is done in Williamsport. ALCOA has an aluminum rolling mill in Lancaster. That's about it for heavy manufacturing.


York has a very large Harley Davidson factory, BAE Systems makes military equipment like the Bradley Fighting Vehicle there, Dentsply Sirona is the US's largest manufacturer of dentistry equipment, Voith Turbine has their main US operation in York, York International is a world leader in equipment for HVAC. And if the YORK unionist's weren't so greedy, they could have kept their Carterpillar plant. There are dozens more small fabricators and manufacturers.


Heavy manufacturing brings wealth to an area. Services industries, which is what Lancaster has, consume wealth.
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Old Today, 02:52 AM
 
592 posts, read 280,972 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wells5 View Post

Heavy manufacturing brings wealth to an area. Services industries, which is what Lancaster has, consume wealth.
Citing long dead industries, and your opinion, does nothing to change facts, or reality. The most currently available GDP figures (2019) for Lancaster county are at 30.5 billion dollars a year for all goods and services produced in the county. York is at 20.9 Billion. Doesn't matter if it's exponential increases in real estate values, the never ending hunt for, building and renovation of industrial and commercial space here, or the strength of all sectors of the economy, for an economy that is not part of a huge metro area, nor attached to a large city, Lancaster county is an amazing outlier.

When the last recession hit bottom, I was in residential construction. There were two metros that were still functional, in a state that had a nearly dead homebuilding industry. They were Harrisburg and Lancaster. The state government activity kept Harrisburg alive, and the diverse economy of LC resulted in a bit of a dip in residential activity, while most other PA. regions were deader that roadkill. The fact that York had a few major industries is both a blessing and a curse. Great in good times, rough when a military contractor loses it's political grip, and can no longer gobble from the DOD trough, or when a huge HVAC manufacturer decides that Alabama or Mexico are better options. In that sense, York is failing. I grew up in the Lehigh Valley, when Mack, Western Electric, and the Bethlehem steel had a grossly over-sized impact and control on the local economy. For many reasons, starting in the 1960s, local business leaders really pushed for economic diversity, and actively cultured a local economy based on large numbers of smaller employers, or smaller divisions of national companies. They didn't want the next giant heavy industry that employed thousands, they wanted hundreds of companies that employed dozens to hundreds. As truck building faltered, transistors became outdated, and steel production failed in the valley, the impact was greatly blunted by three decades of work to diversify. On the other end of the state, the locals took a different approach, and in some sense never recovered, after tens of thousands of high paying jobs in the steel industry disappeared.

Last edited by wharton; Today at 03:17 AM..
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