U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Hawaii
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 06-13-2011, 07:33 PM
 
Location: Homosassa, Florida
2,200 posts, read 3,936,301 times
Reputation: 467

Advertisements

do Hawaii homes really do have paper thin walls? or does the construction age change over period of time and homes in Hawaii are made far better solid?
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-13-2011, 08:31 PM
 
Location: Was in Western New York but now in Hilo Hawaii
1,234 posts, read 4,285,780 times
Reputation: 453
For the most part yes they so but the walls have grown thicker throughout the years just as the building around the world has changed. I live in a house built in the 60s and they are thin but not what is called single wall construction. I have friends that have single wall homes they are strange for people that haven't seen them or have looked into the history as to why they were built that way in the first place. ( I was one of them at one time) To explain a bit the homes were built this way and still are because of space savings, and ventilation. mainly ventilation the moisture here will mold the best things you have in a matter of weeks even your drywall in between your studs. this can cause a big problem. with the new products and techniques we have this has been reduced but not all the way at some places

I hope this helps
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-13-2011, 09:06 PM
 
820 posts, read 2,822,316 times
Reputation: 642
Hawaii currently has building codes, just like every other place is the USA.

Bob, do you mean homes of the past? Then yes, some construction was thinner then, as it was in other hot & rural areas of the US and world.

But if you mean now, then no. The average developer built home is pretty much what you'd find elsewhere. Custom homes can have more features that make the house construction more efficient to the climate here.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-14-2011, 01:18 PM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
10,745 posts, read 20,649,586 times
Reputation: 10347
The set of plans I drew up ten days ago was for a client who wanted single wall construction. They were at an elevation where heating or cooling wasn't a problem so their walls are a nominal 1" thick. Sometimes when folks want single wall with a bit more R factor in their walls, they will use nominal 2" thick single wall construction.

Historically speaking, houses up to about 1915- 1920 were made of actual 1" thick rough sawn wood planks which were an actual 12" wide. (Note: these are the houses the new board and batten houses are supposed to emulate so if you are putting decorative battens on plywood siding, space them at 12" o.c. to make them look real not the 16" o.c. contractors use to save on putting up "extra" battens. Also use very thin battens - about 2" wide by about 3/8" thick.) Anyway, up until the twenties, most buildings were made of 1" thick x 12" wide vertical boards with thin battens on each side and usually a belly band on the inside of the structure.

From about 1920 to about 1940 they were using 1" x 6"-8" wide T & G vertical boards with at least one and up to three bellybands on the outside of the house. From about 1940 to 1950-1960 or so, they were using the narrower 1" x 6" boards. During the later period of time, they occasionally had a different window framing where the frames were on the exterior and went down to the floor, although that wasn't all that common. Frequently, with these houses, part of the plumbing would be hung on the exterior of the house instead of set into a plumbing wall. Usually it would be made of black cast iron pipe and occasionally it would be painted to match the trim of the house.

There was also a period of time in there when the tip of a gable roof was hipped, just the upper three feet at the ends would be hipped. I'm not sure why, it may have just been a style thing. When you see a "Dutch" hip (a hip roof with a ventilation gable set into the top of it) the reason the roof is in that shape is so a big ventilation grid could be set into the peak of the roof. Occasionally one will see a Dutch hip roof without any vent in it at all, which is just plain wrong. (At least, IMHO.) A proper Dutch hip should have a wooden vent constructed to fit that hip shape, not a measly square metal screen set into it, those are unattractive, although at least they will ventilate the attic space to keep the house cooler. (Again, just IMHO.)

From about 1960 or so, many of the houses in Hawaii have been made of the mainland style double wall construction, although there is still a significant number of single wall homes. You could google "Hicks Homes" to find out about a company which made a huge number of single wall homes in Hawaii (somewhere around 2,500 of them) many - if not most - of which are still standing today. Hicks homes were nominal 1" x 8" vertical T & G heart redwood walls with one exterior bellyband. Usually with hardwood floors, too. No underlayment, just floor joists and then the hardwood flooring - 1" x 3" T & G oak usually.

Over the past several decades, there have been a lot of mainland developers who come to Hawaii and build mainland traditional homes. Frequently those houses have problems with things such as ventilation, mold and heating and cooling. There are reasons why Hawaii architecture is different than mainland architecture. The big wide eaves keep the sun off the sides of the house so it is cooler inside. The louver windows let a lot more breeze through to cool off the houses and keep mold and mildew down. Folks who wrap their houses with house wrap and make them tightly sealed can have huge mold and mildew problems when the humidity gets high. Although a lot of this is also dependent on the specific micro-climate of where the house is built.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-14-2011, 02:39 PM
 
Location: Naperville, IL
43 posts, read 87,836 times
Reputation: 118
Here's a 'blurb' I found regarding housewraps:

When Should Housewrap Be Used?
Almost all exterior finishes allow at least some water penetration. If this water continually soaks the wall sheathing and framing members, problems such as dry rot and mold growth could occur. Housewrap stops water that passes through the siding and allows it to drain away from the structural members. In humid climates with heavy rainfall, housewrap is recommended to prevent water damage to the framing. Use in dryer climates may not be as critical, since materials are allowed to adequately dry, Housewrap also prevents air movement through the wall cavity, which is beneficial for insulating purposes.

A wrap for a 'mainland' style home may make perfect sense, but I'd also be prepared to close the home up and run the A/C and/or a dehumidifier. In one of my previous homes (not in HI), I ran a dehumidifier 24/7 (draining into a sump pump) with good results.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-14-2011, 02:46 PM
 
4,919 posts, read 20,987,994 times
Reputation: 6244
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketMaker View Post
A wrap for a 'mainland' style home may make perfect sense, but I'd also be prepared to close the home up and run the A/C and/or a dehumidifier. In one of my previous homes (not in HI), I ran a dehumidifier 24/7 (draining into a sump pump) with good results.
You havn't seen hawaii electric rates, have you?
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-14-2011, 06:45 PM
 
941 posts, read 1,753,630 times
Reputation: 1329
For some people, the electric rates aren't an issue. I have seen beachfront second homes on Kauai that are beautiful, lots of windows for view, but not for breezes. Because the salt air corrodes stuff, especially electronics, the house is sealed up and air-conditioned 24/7 all year. All this for a house that is lived in 2-4 weeks out of the year.

Sure, it's a beautiful Balinese-inspired home, and the friend-of-a-friend caretaker was allowed to invite people over to the hot tub, but it really seems like a waste of resources.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-14-2011, 06:45 PM
 
Location: Homosassa, Florida
2,200 posts, read 3,936,301 times
Reputation: 467
I live on the water front in Florida on a isolated river. 4,300 sq foot. we have 5 A/C units with ducts throughout the two story house. I think some mainland construction firm in California or Washington State would get smart and have big storage lumber yard in Hawaii on the big Island. Build California style estate homes for under $600,000. No need to be on beach location.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-14-2011, 07:10 PM
 
941 posts, read 1,753,630 times
Reputation: 1329
Oh, and what a great topic, I always think that the homogeneity in the US construction market is really counter to the historical techniques that were developed and adapted to the climate and conditions in each region. Lots of great info from hotzcatz, too, thanks for all that.

BTW, I live in a 1950's single-wall construction on Kaua'i, and I love it. It's just like hotzcatz described, 1x8 vertical T&G with a single "bellyband" and wood floors throughout. And of course, 1 inch is really 3/4-inch thick. Yes, if you pound on the walls, or push real hard, they do flex. It is a bit of a problem because the livingroom wall behind where the kitchen cabinets are hung is bowing out from the weight--there's about 1/4" inch bow over the 8-foot height.

We have the outside plumbing on the kitchen side, but it's all covered by vinyl siding now (which has its benefits and its problems). The bathroom plumbing was on an inner wall but sandwiched in a plumbing wall.

Still, I wouldn't call it paper thin. The house has withstood 2 or 3 hurricanes without the roof clips--maybe the old owners did a good job covering the windows to reduce the indoor pressure, I don't know. And there are some great advantages: no toxic drywall to worry about, no place for rodents/insects to live between the walls, there's always a stud when you drill (just don't drill too deep!), and it looks really good (the vertical T&G pattern). My house even has an addition that is double-wall, but the previous owner put T&G wood on the inside wall for looks, bless his heart.

There's a couple of other neat trivia typical of these houses:

I heard that the redwood used to be floated over on the ocean (uncut logs tied together and pulled by a barge, I imagine), giving the wood natural termite protection from the salt (sure enough, termites got into the wood floor and window sills, but not the walls).

The ceilings were made with canec, a pressed board made from bagasse, the pulp left over from sugar cane processing. I think it's really cool that local building materials were created from the local industries of the time. Plus it looks cool with neat swirling patterns.

Hotcatz, I have been wondering what the name of the bellyband was, because I couldn't find any information on how it's made. But even with the name now, I can't find any info with Google. Do you know what it consists of? Is it a metal L bracket covered with a 2x2 or something like that? I wanted to hang a hammock in one room, and I thought it would be better to put the anchor into that support, but I know there's metal in there from one other time I tried to drill it from the outside.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-14-2011, 07:25 PM
 
Location: Homosassa, Florida
2,200 posts, read 3,936,301 times
Reputation: 467
KauaiHiker nice to know you. You might like hammocks.com. They have hammocks on stands. The past several years I have been going up to Alaska and work for the whole summer season. Been getting good jobs in housekeeping prep cook at coolworks.com. I never been to State of Hawaii.

Hammocks.com - Shop Hammock Stands and Hammocks
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Hawaii
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top