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Old 09-12-2011, 09:01 PM
 
Location: USA
69 posts, read 182,516 times
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Okay, I'm sure this has been asked tons of times before, but what are the differences between living in Hawaii (particularly Oahu and Kauai) and the US Midwest (Ohio/Michigan/Indiana/Illinios)? This is other than the obvious HUGE difference in weather - one being sunny, warm, and consistent, the other being cold, dreary, and 87 one day and 56 the next. I've read some posts on here about it (shipping, cost of living is higher, expensive to travel, etc) but how different is it REALLY?
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Old 09-12-2011, 09:18 PM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
10,774 posts, read 20,726,920 times
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The population is not homogenized here like it is in the MidWest. When you see a group of folks there will probably be one or two Filipino folks, a Japanese person or two, a couple of mixed race folks, a Samoan or two, a couple of haoles, some Portugese, a Chinese person, etc. There is a whole mix of different folks and it's all good. It is also polite to inquire about what sort of racial mix they are, generally that is just sort of considered a basic topic of conversation and the differences between the different groups of folks is sort of celebrated. The different folks all live side by side, too. Folks are more sorted by economics than by race.

I visited the MidWest and was really uneasy until I figured out it was because there was only one variety of people around and my sub-conscious was worried about what they'd done to everyone else until I finally figured out there was only one type of people there. Very odd.

A friend of mine took a new wife to the mid-West, this was in November or December, I think it was. She was really really quiet as they were driving away from the airport and he finally asked her why she was so quiet. She asked "How big was the fire?" since she'd thought the lack of leaves on the trees was from a forest fire.

Having one's garden die every fall is just so bizarre!
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Old 09-12-2011, 09:25 PM
 
Location: USA
69 posts, read 182,516 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hotzcatz View Post
Having one's garden die every fall is just so bizarre!
So sad and crappy is more like it... (I am not a fan of winter at all...)

But yes, there are certainly more caucasian people in the MIdwest than other races, though are pretty good sized Black, Hispanic, and Middle Eastern communities in this area, too. Not too many Japanese/Chinese people, though. I think there's a lot more people of other races around here than most people realize, actually. But more diversity would definitely not be a problem for me.
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Old 09-12-2011, 11:28 PM
 
Location: Hilo Hawaii
10 posts, read 31,746 times
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It is VERY different. We just moved from Minnesota to Hilo. The weather is just the tip of the iceberg as far as differences. The culture is different. The grocery prices are very different. The healthcare is different. The food is different. The Arts are different. I am not saying the differences are bad, just different and takes some time to adjust. We have lived here for 3 months and in just the last week we have stopped thinking about going back home and are enjoying it much more here.
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Old 09-13-2011, 12:23 AM
 
Location: OKC
5,426 posts, read 5,986,143 times
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One of the biggest differences is that you'll have Manhattan prices at Missouri wages... and that is not one bit of exaggeration.

The public schools generally also aren't very good.

But it is a special place, a magical place. No place else like it on earth, but it's kind of hard to put into words all of the reasons why - I think you have to experience it.

I wouldn't go there to live if I had school age children or didn't have a good way to make a living. But before or after kids, and with some change in your pocket it's a pretty cool deal.
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Old 09-13-2011, 12:35 AM
 
Location: Macao
16,087 posts, read 38,428,033 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Surfer-Girl View Post
Okay, I'm sure this has been asked tons of times before, but what are the differences between living in Hawaii (particularly Oahu and Kauai) and the US Midwest (Ohio/Michigan/Indiana/Illinios)? This is other than the obvious HUGE difference in weather - one being sunny, warm, and consistent, the other being cold, dreary, and 87 one day and 56 the next. I've read some posts on here about it (shipping, cost of living is higher, expensive to travel, etc) but how different is it REALLY?
The Midwest is CHEAP!

You can buy a house for $100,000 almost anywhere in the Midwest, and have a full basement, garage, several bedrooms, etc. Large yard, etc.

In contrast to Honolulu, where $100,000 MIGHT get you a small 300 ft square studio....maybe. But I think you're looking more at $200,000 for a small tiny little studio apartment in Honolulu.

Kauia and Oahu are both extremely expensive for rent or housing. On top of that, you're going to get low Midwestern-like wages for jobs as well

Culture and politics are so incredibly different, I don't see how it can be explained in several paragraphs, you'd need books to study it, it's so different. But, basically most people in Hawaii adhere to more Asian-like and Pacific Islander cultures - Japanese, Filipino, Hawaiian, Samoan, etc. Haole/white culture is just a minority culture.
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Old 09-13-2011, 03:14 AM
 
3 posts, read 7,019 times
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Default Questions

Quote:
Originally Posted by byerssue View Post
It is VERY different. We just moved from Minnesota to Hilo. The weather is just the tip of the iceberg as far as differences. The culture is different. The grocery prices are very different. The healthcare is different. The food is different. The Arts are different. I am not saying the differences are bad, just different and takes some time to adjust. We have lived here for 3 months and in just the last week we have stopped thinking about going back home and are enjoying it much more here.
Hello,

I'm not sure if I am doing this right...but I am looking into going to the university in Hilo to finish my nursing degree. I am a single mother of a 15 yr old son and would like to know more about the rental housing, schools, just your basic every day life kinda thing. While the whole idea of living in HI sounds wonderful. Who wouldn't want to live in a place with no snow? (We live in KS and have lived here all of my life) the thought of moving somewhere where I have no clue about the lifestyle, good areas/bad areas and such is rather frightening. Any info you have would be much appreciated!
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Old 09-13-2011, 09:59 AM
 
7,150 posts, read 9,352,069 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nursecathie View Post
Hello,

I'm not sure if I am doing this right...but I am looking into going to the university in Hilo to finish my nursing degree. I am a single mother of a 15 yr old son and would like to know more about the rental housing, schools, just your basic every day life kinda thing. While the whole idea of living in HI sounds wonderful. Who wouldn't want to live in a place with no snow? (We live in KS and have lived here all of my life) the thought of moving somewhere where I have no clue about the lifestyle, good areas/bad areas and such is rather frightening. Any info you have would be much appreciated!
As a [haole] father of four, including three boys, from the mainland but who has lived in Hawaii, I seriously urge you to NOT put your 15-year-son through the adventure of being a haole mainland teen in Hawaii ... there are challenges even for little kids, depending on island and neighborhood ... but Hilo for a 15-year-old with no background here is 99.9% sure to be a disaster. It is not as simple as just citing racism ... it is cultural shock and educational shock with a good measure of probable racist overtones. The schools absolutely suck. The culture is vastly more different than you can possibly image in spite of Hawaii being one of the 50 states.

Only one of my sons came to live in Hawaii with me and he was in his early 20's at the time ... he enjoyed many many things about Honolulu and Oahu ... made many friends of all races ... and still experienced difficulties with adapting. He has moved back to the mainland. Although he misses things about Hawaii and says he sometimes considers returning, he says not until he is middle-aged and the testosterone aspect of young male interaction is essentially passed. My son, by the way, is one tough customer ... can hold his own with most anyone ... but he is also basically a happy, life-loving, athletic guy and simply doesn't care for unnecessary hassle and conflict ... waste of his time, he says.

Good luck
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Old 09-13-2011, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Kūkiʻo, HI & Manhattan Beach, CA
2,624 posts, read 6,584,977 times
Reputation: 2407
Quote:
Originally Posted by Surfer-Girl View Post
Okay, I'm sure this has been asked tons of times before, but what are the differences between living in Hawaii (particularly Oahu and Kauai) and the US Midwest (Ohio/Michigan/Indiana/Illinios)? This is other than the obvious HUGE difference in weather - one being sunny, warm, and consistent, the other being cold, dreary, and 87 one day and 56 the next. I've read some posts on here about it (shipping, cost of living is higher, expensive to travel, etc) but how different is it REALLY?
The U.S. Midwest consists of what many folks consider a bunch of "flyover" states, while they view Hawai'i is a "fly-to" state.
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Old 09-13-2011, 02:21 PM
 
1,210 posts, read 2,353,987 times
Reputation: 1189
Quote:
Originally Posted by Surfer-Girl View Post
Okay, I'm sure this has been asked tons of times before, but what are the differences between living in Hawaii (particularly Oahu and Kauai) and the US Midwest (Ohio/Michigan/Indiana/Illinios)? This is other than the obvious HUGE difference in weather - one being sunny, warm, and consistent, the other being cold, dreary, and 87 one day and 56 the next. I've read some posts on here about it (shipping, cost of living is higher, expensive to travel, etc) but how different is it REALLY?
Coming from someone who has lived in and has family in Missouri and Indiana, plus has lived in and is married to a girl from Hawaii I can say that there really is not much to compare aside from the general friendliness of midwestern folks / hawaii locals and the typical wage you can expect to earn (which goes a lot further in the midwest).

People talk differently, the demographics are different, the terrain is different (generally flat vs steep mountains rising from the ocean). People in Hawaii seem to consider themselves less "American" by culture and more "hawaii local"/ whatever their ethnicity is.

The economy in Hawaii is mostly tourism, government, and military where many of the midwestern economies mostly seem to rely on manufacturing, agriculture, and high tech.

The midwest has lakes and rivers, the hawaiian islands are surrounded by ocean. The midwest has large temperature swings, tornados, blizzards, seasons etc... the hawaiian islands have a wet season and a dry season with the occasional kona storm and very rare hurricane.

Groceries in Hawaii will cost you at least 20% more than a typical midwestern city. You can reduce that somewhat by eating local fruits/veggies but meat, dairy, cereal, bread, and most other things (except beer for some reason) cost a lot more.

The "mainland" is talked about almost as if it is another country and most locals I knew had little concern of any place east of Las Vegas (aside from NYC and DC). Nothing wrong with it, they really don't have a reason to care about those places, but it is kind of weird when you are from there.

It is just night and day. You would have an easier time making a list of the few things that are similar.
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