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Old 05-12-2012, 09:24 PM
 
Location: Hawai'i
1,392 posts, read 2,826,764 times
Reputation: 704

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I gave up my right to vote in US elections when I moved to a U.S. territory, and I'm so excited about moving to an actual US state before the November elections!

Doing a little research, I see that the voter registration form does not have a place for you to register your party preference.

As I was wondering how y'all handle primaries, I found this.

Quote:
Single Party Primary

The primary election is held to nominate candidates who will represent each political party in the general election. Similarly, candidates who do not belong to a specific party must also be nominated in order to appear on the general election ballot as a nonpartisan candidate. In Hawaii, a special type of primary called the “Single Party Primary” is conducted according to the Hawaii Revised Statutes.

Hawaii Revised Statutes Section 12-31 provides:

“No person eligible to vote in any primary or special primary election shall be required to state a party preference or nonpartisanship as a condition of voting. Each voter shall be issued the primary or special primary ballot for each party and the nonpartisan primary or special primary ballot. A voter shall be entitled to vote only for candidates of one party or only for nonpartisan candidates. If the primary or special primary ballot is marked contrary to this paragraph, the ballot shall not be counted.”
Accordingly, candidates who belong to a specific party are listed alphabetically by contest on a specific party ballot. Candidates who do not belong to any party are listed alphabetically by contest on a nonpartisan ballot. Each voter is limited to voting for candidates on one and only one color-coded or nonpartisan ballot.

Votes cast by voters on more than one color-coded section are not counted.
I don't even have a question or an opinion, I'm just so excited to have my voting rights restored, and fascinated by the single party primary.
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Old 05-12-2012, 11:19 PM
 
Location: Volcano
12,971 posts, read 26,091,316 times
Reputation: 10679
Quote:
Originally Posted by DebbyDiver View Post
I don't even have a question or an opinion, I'm just so excited to have my voting rights restored, and fascinated by the single party primary.
Yeah, good for you. You can register to vote when you get your drivers license.
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Old 05-13-2012, 06:38 AM
 
Location: Hawai'i
1,392 posts, read 2,826,764 times
Reputation: 704
Cool, that's very convenient! I can also register online, and might do that the week that I move so that it's waiting for me.

Most important things to acquire in a new location: driver's license, library card, and voter registration!

I suppose people don't say "I'm a registered (insert party here)" in Hawai'i as they do in many other areas.
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Old 05-13-2012, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
10,879 posts, read 21,623,153 times
Reputation: 10546
We're just registered voters, not registered voters of any particular party. Frequently folks will change their party affiliation several times during an election. Say if you are a firm "purple party" (note: that's just an imaginary party for the sake of the conversation) believer, you register as a "mauve party" supporter and go vote in their primary so you can vote for a candidate which won't have much of a hope against your actual party's candidate.

Generally the state is Democratic, but we still elect Republicans anyway. It's more of a who the candidate is than what party they are with. The candidates switch parties too so I don't see how it makes much of a difference one way or another.

I always honk and wave at whoever is waving signs alongside the roadway. I don't care who their political candidate is, if they care enough to go out alongside the roads and wave signs, I'll honk for them.
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Old 05-13-2012, 03:22 PM
 
Location: Hawai'i
1,392 posts, read 2,826,764 times
Reputation: 704
Cool post, thanks hotzcatz!
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Old 05-13-2012, 07:43 PM
 
Location: Molokai, HI
229 posts, read 879,454 times
Reputation: 208
Quote:
Originally Posted by hotzcatz View Post

I always honk and wave at whoever is waving signs alongside the roadway. I don't care who their political candidate is, if they care enough to go out alongside the roads and wave signs, I'll honk for them.
Besides, in any group waving signs, doesn't matter what for, you always know some of them. Good to wave.
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Old 05-14-2012, 02:25 PM
 
4,919 posts, read 21,582,490 times
Reputation: 6247
I think hawaii is one of those places where the party isn't as important as the person. Most times i wave cause they waved at me. I may nto even know they are sign waving for a candidate, it could be the 2 for 1 plate lunch special for all I know.
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Old 05-14-2012, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Hawai'i
1,392 posts, read 2,826,764 times
Reputation: 704
Quote:
Originally Posted by PacificFlights View Post
I think hawaii is one of those places where the party isn't as important as the person.
I like that, a LOT!!!
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Old 05-17-2012, 07:20 PM
 
Location: Honolulu, HI
60 posts, read 233,965 times
Reputation: 42
I have never encountered the amount of sign waving that is here in Hawaii anywhere else. I think it's really refreshing to see people so active about candidates and the process. Even living in DC, the sense of apathy was palpable
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Old 05-18-2012, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Middle of the valley
42,398 posts, read 27,482,890 times
Reputation: 60992
Quote:
Originally Posted by PacificFlights View Post
I think hawaii is one of those places where the party isn't as important as the person. Most times i wave cause they waved at me. I may nto even know they are sign waving for a candidate, it could be the 2 for 1 plate lunch special for all I know.
In a state where Republicans change to Democrats to ensure they have SOME chance to win... I would strongly disagree.
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