U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Health and Wellness > Health Insurance
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-22-2018, 01:28 AM
 
Location: Wisconsin
23,546 posts, read 50,140,471 times
Reputation: 18197

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by rothbear View Post
That is definitely NOT good news for those of us without pensions, huge IRAs ,and big SS checks. We have been with them since we started but if that is the Tier 2 rate, it is much higher than we are already paying for F. And if F goes up like that starting 2020 we aren't going to be able to afford it. Unfortunately I have not had a good 12 months healthwise. Had major surgery for diverticulitis 11/17 and then reversal 5/18 including all the hospital time, medical supplies and follow up visits. Although that is hopefully behind me now, I'm sure they are going to hold that against me since they had to pay a lot for all of it. Plus DH has sleep apnea (controlled with unit) which insurance companies don't like at all. Would have been nice if UHC had told us that before they did it. One more thing to worry about. We can try, though. I assume that if it isn't on the Medicare.gov site we would have to go directly to UHC to do this. Not sure why I didn't see your post earlier, but at least we still have until 12/7. Thanks!
December 7th has nothing to do with Medigaps which can be bought/switched at any time during the year. Annual Open Enrollment expiring 12/7 only applies to Advantage and Part D plans.

In your case, rothbear, you're probably best off staying with F since you have a lower (Tier 1) rate for that now than you would with a Tier 2 G unless UHC will overlook health underwriting in your case. The differential between F&G won't be nearly as much as a Tier 2 rate - probably only $20 a month or so for a while, as opposed to an over $100 increase for Tier 2.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-23-2018, 04:32 AM
 
Location: NJ
15,447 posts, read 24,395,320 times
Reputation: 15157
Quote:
Originally Posted by greatblueheron View Post
Which do you have, if you don't mind saying...

medical, pharmacy??

How did you decide on this company and plan??
I have prescription insurance thru them. They're the only company to cover all of my meds. I've had one issue with them and it was huge. I was reevaluated with social security disability, my benefits stopped a few days then started again. I missed one piece of mail saying they needed my payment, it normally came out of my check so they shut me off. I was not short a payment at the time, it was only shut off less then a week; I had offered to prepay until my next check came, they refused to reinstate me; I went without script insurance 2 months. I was forced to withdraw from my main pain med. They could have reinstated it but they refused. So be careful with payments because they mean business. I couldn't even find another plan for 2 months. I've been with them a good 5 years if not longer and in good standing too so I couldn't understand why they wouldn't reinstate it. Of course I had just gone into the coverage gap where they had to pay more of my meds. Talk about pissed but of course I chose them again last year and next

Quote:
Originally Posted by greatblueheron View Post
I'll be enrolling early next year and am just starting to check out plans etc. AARP approval says a lot even though they have nothing to do with enacting plans. Now I have positive words from many here...

thank you!
Are you going with a medigap?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-30-2018, 06:37 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
6,070 posts, read 6,381,640 times
Reputation: 21028
My wife is in the process of switching from a Medicare Advantage plan to original Medicare with a supplemental Plan G from AARP-United Healthcare.

The salesman they sent out claims that these AARP plans allow customers to switch plans without the need to re-qualify once approved. For example, if you started out in Plan G but 10 years out you discover that the premium is too big, you could switch to a lesser, cheaper plan.

Is this really true or was the buy just full of it?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-30-2018, 07:20 AM
 
439 posts, read 592,778 times
Reputation: 557
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision67 View Post
My wife is in the process of switching from a Medicare Advantage plan to original Medicare with a supplemental Plan G from AARP-United Healthcare.

The salesman they sent out claims that these AARP plans allow customers to switch plans without the need to re-qualify once approved. For example, if you started out in Plan G but 10 years out you discover that the premium is too big, you could switch to a lesser, cheaper plan.

Is this really true or was the buy just full of it?
This is an internal policy by UHC that can be discontinued at any time. For example, prior to October 1st UHC members could downgrade from Plan F to G without medical underwriting but that now requires underwriting. I would not consider that factor when making a Medigap purchase decision.

Some states (CA, OR, WA, CT, MA, NY) have special rules allowing Medigap changes without underwriting but CO is not one of those states.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SCGamecock View Post
Update: UHC/AARP is revising their internal policy of allowing existing members to downgrade from Medigap plan F to G without underwriting. It looks like courtesy downgrades to Plan N will still be allowed.

Quote:
Starting October 1, 2018, members currently enrolled in an AARP® Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan, including Medicare Select Plans, insured by UnitedHealthcare® Insurance Company, residing in all states and territories EXCEPT CA, CT, FL, GU, MA, ME, MN, MP, NY, OR, VI, VT, WA, and WI who wish to change to Plan G will now need to complete a new application and answer all medical underwriting questions to determine a premium rate. This new underwriting policy is in response to UnitedHealthcare’s efforts to maintain stable Plan G premium rates and product competiveness.

Reference: http://www.psmbrokerage.com/blog/new...surance-plan-g
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-30-2018, 05:01 PM
 
Location: Northern panhandle WV
3,007 posts, read 2,493,318 times
Reputation: 6763
It was the case last year when we changed from their plan F to plan G. I don't know if that has changed or not I would call and ask their customer service directly.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-04-2018, 09:45 AM
 
18 posts, read 14,512 times
Reputation: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ariadne22 View Post
AARP is higher because it is a community-rated policy, with a cap on age-based rate increases at age 77. Mutual of Omaha is an attained-age policy, and can raise its rates due to age until age 85.

One should avoid purchasing a Medigap based on what is "cheapest" at the time. You want to look at overall pricing long-term.

We had a thread on MOO a while back, here - please read carefully - lots of good comments:

//www.city-data.com/forum/healt...al-policy.html

Most here purchase the AARP UHC policy because it is community-rated with a cap at age 77 on increases due to age.

Medigap on pricing:

https://www.medicare.gov/find-a-plan...-policies.aspx

An attained-age policy can quickly become very pricey. Example: My sister bought an attained-age policy from Aetna at age 66 for $142. Today, three years later, her premium is $205, whereas Aetna will sell a new policy to a 69 y/o for $167. Whatever rate you were told you would have at age 70, 75, etc. applies ONLY to purchasers that age - not you - because your book of business/risk pool will have closed and rates will be higher. SCGamecock has a good post on the above-link on that issue.

While your health is still good and you are young, consider switching to either an issue-age policy or AARP UHC community-rated - especially if you expect to live to your 80's and 90's.
You may be right about this policy when I reach my 80's. You also don't know if AARP will be around in 10 to 15 years. When I got my Omaha medigap plan G at age 66 in 2016, I was paying $106. In 2019 I will be paying $125 which is under 18% increase in 4 years or about 4 1/2% increase per year, so it doesn't appear like they are gauging me yet. That's under 5% a year.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-04-2018, 03:15 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
23,546 posts, read 50,140,471 times
Reputation: 18197
Quote:
Originally Posted by vagabond48 View Post
You also don't know if AARP will be around in 10 to 15 years.
Essentially, the insurer was and is United Healthcare. After one year, AARP sponsorship is out of the picture and membership is not a requisite for renewals.

As the largest Medigap insurer in the country, United Healthcare "no longer being around" would be quite an event. As of December 2016, UHC had a 34% market share of Medigap policies sold, or 4,279,361 policies. The next closest carrier had a 9.68% market share, or 1,216,555 policies. In other words, UHC's share of this market was 351% greater than its next competitor - which is, coincidentally, MOO (see second link below).

https://www.aarpsupplementalhealth.c.../WB26308NY.pdf

https://www.markfarrah.com/mfa-brief...nt-plans-2018/

On the off-chance UHC would decide to abandon this huge market, under Medicare rules you have guaranteed issue rights to purchase another Medigap from another carrier without health underwriting.

https://www.medicare.gov/find-a-plan...otections.aspx

So, I wouldn't base my decision on UHC leaving the Medigap market. Either way, you're covered.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vagabond48 View Post
When I got my Omaha medigap plan G at age 66 in 2016, I was paying $106. In 2019 I will be paying $125 which is under 18% increase in 4 years or about 4 1/2% increase per year, so it doesn't appear like they are gauging me yet. That's under 5% a year.
Indeed. So far, your rate increases have been fair, unlike my sister's Aetna policy. In three years between ages 66-69, the premium increased $60/mo., or over 12% a year.

Area of country also has an impact on how aggressively attained-age policies raise rates. Generally, some of the southern and western states (GA, AL, AR, NC, SC, AZ) experience lower rates. Otoh, we had a post a few years ago from the daughter of a FL resident who said her 83 y/o FL-based mother was paying over $400/mo. for her MOO Medigap. FL also has a huge number of Medicare residents. For that reason, UHC doesn't offer a community-rated plan in that state, but does sell issue-age rated policies.

Hopefully, if you're in one of the low-cost states, you won't experience a perfect storm of an unaffordable rate and bad health at the same time.

Last edited by Ariadne22; 12-04-2018 at 04:41 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-04-2018, 05:19 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
23,546 posts, read 50,140,471 times
Reputation: 18197
^^Interesting factoid on Medigap profits:
Quote:
Medicare Supplement remains an attractive line of business for carriers. Med Supp plans collectively earned $29.9 billion in premiums and incurred $23.2 billion in claims during 2017, up from 2016. The aggregate loss ratio (incurred claims as a percent of earned premiums) was 77.7% in 2017, a slight decline from 77.8% in 2016.

https://www.markfarrah.com/mfa-brief...nt-plans-2018/
Essentially, in 2017 the Medigap carriers had $6.7 billion in gross profit with which to pay administrative, advertising and other costs. No doubt some part of the $6.7 billion was also allocated to reserves.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2018, 04:43 PM
 
Location: SW US
2,544 posts, read 2,384,988 times
Reputation: 4557
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ariadne22 View Post
Essentially, the insurer was and is United Healthcare. After one year, AARP sponsorship is out of the picture and membership is not a requisite for renewals.



I am surprised to hear this. I thought we had to continue AARP membership to continue the policy.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2018, 07:41 PM
 
18 posts, read 14,512 times
Reputation: 11
Ariadne22, since you mention higher rates that may occur in 5 to 10 years, it is very possible that we might finally get true medicare for all where after a small deductible all medical bills will be covered, "I hope".
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Health and Wellness > Health Insurance

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top