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Old 12-05-2018, 10:21 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
23,582 posts, read 50,299,979 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vagabond48 View Post
Ariadne22, since you mention higher rates that may occur in 5 to 10 years, it is very possible that we might finally get true medicare for all where after a small deductible all medical bills will be covered, "I hope".
GOP would have to be a permanent minority in Congress - and common sense, civility, and working for the good of ALL - not the party and corporate interests - would need to, once again, be the guiding principle of our elected representatives. You decide the likelihood of that. There's way too much profit for private insurers in the current system. They won't go down without a fight.
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Old 12-05-2018, 10:45 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Windwalker2 View Post
I am surprised to hear this. I thought we had to continue AARP membership to continue the policy.
No. This fact was posted recently on our forum (can't find it now), but I found another source, here:

https://viabenefits.custhelp.com/app...p-next-year%3F

Whatever discounts are offered when you first purchase the policy, continue with the renewals. AARP membership not required.
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Old 12-09-2018, 07:49 AM
 
Location: On the wind
1,045 posts, read 490,339 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ariadne22 View Post
No. This fact was posted recently on our forum (can't find it now), but I found another source, here:

https://viabenefits.custhelp.com/app...p-next-year%3F

Whatever discounts are offered when you first purchase the policy, continue with the renewals. AARP membership not required.
Correct! I did not maintain an AARP membership but have had their policy for the past 10 years.
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Old 06-10-2019, 12:52 PM
 
3,563 posts, read 3,005,166 times
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Reviving this thread with a question. A relative will be turning 65 in September. He will of course sign up for Medicare prior to that. (He can sign up now, I know.) I've also advised him to buy a supplemental plan because of the "medical underwriting" rule that kicks in after the 6 month open enrollment period for supplemental plans.


My question is this: If he chooses one plan from a Medigap/supplemental insurer, can he later switch to another plan offered by the same insurer without going through medical underwriting? Or does that vary from insurer to insurer? He's thinking he might want one of the cheaper plans now and one of the more expensive ones later when he's older. But he has a medical condition, so medical underwriting would kick in, if that is the rule.



Thanks for any help! This stuff can be confusing at times. My hubby chose AARP/UHC years ago and has been happy with it, so we haven't had to think about picking a supplemental plan in a long time.
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Old 06-10-2019, 01:31 PM
 
231 posts, read 152,252 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LoriNJ View Post
My question is this: If he chooses one plan from a Medigap/supplemental insurer, can he later switch to another plan offered by the same insurer without going through medical underwriting? Or does that vary from insurer to insurer?
He should expect to have to undergo medical underwriting if he switches insurance companies. There may be some exceptions to this based on differing availability of coverage by different companies in different areas of the country, but basically, yeah, he'd should expect he'd have to do it.

It's one reason I didn't pick the very cheapest plan myself. The cheapest one was attained-age rated and since I'm just 65 it was cheaper. Premiums would likely rise faster, however, as I age than the community-rated plan I did end up choosing.
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Old 06-10-2019, 01:33 PM
 
5,070 posts, read 5,416,800 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atlguy44 View Post
Correct! I did not maintain an AARP membership but have had their policy for the past 10 years.


I just got an AARP brochure regarding a supplement plan and it clearly said you had to join AARP to get started. I thought that was odd.
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Old 06-10-2019, 01:35 PM
 
231 posts, read 152,252 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brava4 View Post
I just got an AARP brochure regarding a supplement plan and it clearly said you had to join AARP to get started. I thought that was odd.
It's just $12. You don't have to renew after the first time. No big deal.
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Old 06-10-2019, 05:27 PM
 
Location: Dover, DE
2,130 posts, read 4,202,958 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LoriNJ View Post
Reviving this thread with a question. A relative will be turning 65 in September. He will of course sign up for Medicare prior to that. (He can sign up now, I know.) I've also advised him to buy a supplemental plan because of the "medical underwriting" rule that kicks in after the 6 month open enrollment period for supplemental plans.

My question is this: If he chooses one plan from a Medigap/supplemental insurer, can he later switch to another plan offered by the same insurer without going through medical underwriting? Or does that vary from insurer to insurer? He's thinking he might want one of the cheaper plans now and one of the more expensive ones later when he's older. But he has a medical condition, so medical underwriting would kick in, if that is the rule.

Thanks for any help! This stuff can be confusing at times. My hubby chose AARP/UHC years ago and has been happy with it, so we haven't had to think about picking a supplemental plan in a long time.

We joined UHC(AARP) specifically for this reason. They stated that you could change between their policies without medical underwriting at any time. Hubby has sleep apnea and I have back problems. We joined with F supplement but then the feds changed the rules and said the F would no longer be offered starting 2020. With concerns about the cost rising too fast once there were no more people joining the F, we figured we would change to the G. Now it appears that UHC or AARP changed the rules and now you can no longer move from F to G without medical underwriting. We were not informed of this coming change and given a chance to change or we would have done it then. Unfortunately in the last 1.5 years I developed other problems that I'm sure will make me fail that considering I have just gotten out of the hospital for the 4th time with at least 1 more surgery to come. Plus that we have been told by other insurance companies that apnea is an immediate fail. So now we will be forced to either pay higher premiums faster, or be forced to a lower tier that won't cover as much. I am not happy with UHC at this time but am stuck. We will probably try but don't have high hopes.
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Old 06-10-2019, 05:33 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
23,582 posts, read 50,299,979 times
Reputation: 18250
Quote:
Originally Posted by LoriNJ View Post
Reviving this thread with a question. A relative will be turning 65 in September. He will of course sign up for Medicare prior to that. (He can sign up now, I know.) I've also advised him to buy a supplemental plan because of the "medical underwriting" rule that kicks in after the 6 month open enrollment period for supplemental plans.

My question is this: If he chooses one plan from a Medigap/supplemental insurer, can he later switch to another plan offered by the same insurer without going through medical underwriting? Or does that vary from insurer to insurer?

He's thinking he might want one of the cheaper plans now and one of the more expensive ones later when he's older. But he has a medical condition, so medical underwriting would kick in, if that is the rule.
Depends on where he lives. Unless he lives in MA, NY, CT, CA, OR, ME or MO, he will almost certainly be required to undergo health underwriting if he later decides to switch. Circumstances for guaranteed issue vary by state, as outlined on this link:

https://www.medicareresources.org/states/

Otherwise, depending on his ailments, he may may not be accepted or charged a higher rate if his current policy becomes unaffordable.

His best choice now at age 65 is either an issue-age policy or a community-rated policy such as yours with AARP. Plan N might be a good choice - small cost sharing (Part B deductible, $20 per doctor visit, $50 ER if not hospitalized) which reduces the premium and still mitigation of rate increases because of community rating. Going forward, that small cost sharing should result in lower premium increases as well.

Issue age policies retain the same basic rate at the time one enrolls and increase premiums based on medical costs.

Community-rated
AARP discounts rates for those under 77, with age-based and rate-based premium increases each year. After age 77, only premium increases are due to rises in medical costs. Whether one is 77 or 97, because of community rating, the rate is the same.

Medicare on policy pricing, here:

https://www.medicare.gov/find-a-plan...-policies.aspx

He should avoid an attained-age policy - cheaper in the beginning - but rate increases continue with some insurers until age 85. It isn't unusual for an 80+ senior to have a Medigap premium of well over $400/mo. Again, unless in a guaranteed issue state or a state, bad health can preclude switching to a less expensive policy.

He could also consider a high-deductible F which caps his 20% at $2,300. High-deductible F plans are considerably less expensive and premium increases are modest. For the reasonably healthy person, an hd-F can be a very cost-effective choice. Many here have them.

Last edited by Ariadne22; 06-10-2019 at 06:51 PM..
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Old 06-10-2019, 06:08 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
23,582 posts, read 50,299,979 times
Reputation: 18250
Quote:
Originally Posted by rothbear View Post
We joined UHC(AARP) specifically for this reason. They stated that you could change between their policies without medical underwriting at any time. Hubby has sleep apnea and I have back problems. We joined with F supplement but then the feds changed the rules and said the F would no longer be offered starting 2020.

With concerns about the cost rising too fast once there were no more people joining the F, we figured we would change to the G. Now it appears that UHC or AARP changed the rules and now you can no longer move from F to G without medical underwriting.

We were not informed of this coming change and given a chance to change or we would have done it then. Unfortunately in the last 1.5 years I developed other problems that I'm sure will make me fail that considering I have just gotten out of the hospital for the 4th time with at least 1 more surgery to come. Plus that we have been told by other insurance companies that apnea is an immediate fail.
AARP instituted this change in October 2018. SCGamecock posted the update in August, 2018, here:

//www.city-data.com/forum/52935049-post31.html

Too bad AARP didn't notify its members. Unless you read every post on this forum (which I usually do, but I'm odd, I know), it's easy to miss this info.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rothbear View Post
So now we will be forced to either pay higher premiums faster, or be forced to a lower tier that won't cover as much. I am not happy with UHC at this time but am stuck. We will probably try but don't have high hopes.
Will UHC allow you to downgrade to a Plan N without underwriting? If so, you should do that. You don't lose any coverage. In addition to the Part B deductible, there is small cost-sharing such as $20 per doctor visit, $50 ER if you aren't admitted to the hospital - all of which help with lower premiums now and going forward. Otherwise, you're still way better off than with an attained-age policy with another company. Because of its large book of business, UHC's community rating will continue to mitigate the rate increases after age 77. Right now, you are experiencing aged-based and inflation rate increases. After age 77, your only rate-increases will be due to group medical costs. Possibly higher percentagewise than those who have a Plan G and certainly an N, but still much better than an MOO or its ilk.

Last edited by Ariadne22; 06-10-2019 at 06:50 PM..
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