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Old 10-08-2018, 08:48 PM
 
312 posts, read 170,391 times
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ERH, I don't have an exact answer to your question on picking up 90-day prescriptions at the drugstore - but last time I was in CVS I picked up a 30-day supply (we've had drug-change roulette recently, and while the doctor was trying some new meds, I filled 30 days' supply at drugstore rather than 90 days' with mail order) and they asked if I would like to get them in a 90-day supply. Some of the Part D plans use a specific pharmacy, like a Walgreens, so it may well be. Anecdotally, in the check-out line I heard a man say that SilverScript has been his best drug plan so far.

If I find out anything while doing her Part D enrollment in the next few weeks, I'll post back with info. Not my favorite time of year either... I wish they could simplify everything.

And thank you, greatblueheron, I'm glad it was helpful! I look longingly at these Medicare supplements as compared to the pre-65 Individual plans which are far more expensive and cover so much less.
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Old 10-08-2018, 08:56 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
27,090 posts, read 7,937,261 times
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I'll be enrolling early next year and am just starting to check out plans etc. AARP approval says a lot even though they have nothing to do with enacting plans. Now I have positive words from many here...

thank you!
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Old 10-08-2018, 08:59 PM
 
312 posts, read 170,391 times
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BBCjunkie, it is for all "F" plans, not just United Healthcare. The reason, as I understand it, is the government wants to do away with "first dollar coverage" so that people have some skin in the game (a deductible) so they don't rush off to the doctor all the time (which they're more inclined to do when they don't see a bill, or so the thinking goes). I only know about my mother's "F" plan which is not a high-deductible one. Existing people can keep their "F" plans, but with no new people joining it, and people dying off, the risk pool will shrink over time and the premiums will likely go up. Or so I've read. There are some real insurance experts who post here, and hopefully they'll weigh in.

I found this article just now which summarizes it a bit better: https://www.moneytips.com/medicare-p...ay-in-2020/220
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Old 10-08-2018, 09:02 PM
 
2,759 posts, read 1,239,562 times
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Okay, I just did some research and don't need to push the panic button re the Plan F's after all.
I found out two things:

(1) Plan Fs are going away in 2020 ONLY FOR PEOPLE BRAND NEW TO MEDICARE. In other words since I am already on Medicare A/B I will still be able to buy a Plan F after 2020 if I want it. That's because in my state you can add or drop any supplemental plan at any time of the year. We are all community rated. So a person here can join Medicare for the first time in, say, 2010 but can decide to wait until 2015 or 2020 or 2025 to buy a supplement. Or have one for a few years, drop it entirely, and then get the same or different plan a few years later. Basically it is just like term life insurance, you can buy it here whenever, drop it whenever, switch companies whenever. It's very convenient. I think there is only one other state that does this.

(2) For the new Medicare people in 2020 and after, there will be a high deductible Plan G which will be comparable to the current high deductible plan Fs. I suspect that the premiums for this new G will be comparable to what the Fs are now.

Last edited by BBCjunkie; 10-08-2018 at 09:17 PM..
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Old 10-08-2018, 09:12 PM
 
Location: Dover, DE
2,128 posts, read 4,197,109 times
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DH and I both have it and they have been wonderful. We have F and will probably keep that for 2019, but may change to G for 2020. I have to look at numbers.

In February, 2017 I had to be in the hospital for an emergency was there for 8 days. Transferred from an ER in the next town by ambulance and had 3 CT scans as well as general testing. I had Aetna ACA Silver plan then and spent the next 3 months going back and forth between them and providers trying to get the bills paid. They used every excuse possible. I won't go into the very long story but it was totally ridiculous. July, 2017 I got Medicare and the AARP supplement. Back in the hospital for emergency abdominal surgery in November and in for a 6 days. Many follow up visits, including home health. May of this year I again had major abdominal surgery and in for 5 days. Again some home health and many follow-up visits also a couple of visits to my PCP and another specialist. Had a scare the end of August and had to have another CT scan and blood work. So far I have not had to pay one penny for any of it. Medicare and UHC has taken care of it all with not one intervention from me. We are very happy.


Someone asked about Humana PartD. We have that. It is actually Humana WalMart and have had it for 2 years. DH takes 2 basic generic drugs (BP and cholesterol) and I take 1 generic drug (generic for Zanaflex). All are low tier so we took the cheapest plan we could find just to make sure we wouldn't get hit with a penalty should something happen. Although they would like us to do mail in, we usually just go to WalMart for a 3 month prescription. Around here the docs no longer give out paper prescriptions so it's easy for them to electronically send it to WM. Frankly I would prefer it this way unless there was a huge price difference. I don't trust the PO/FX/UPS to get it to me in a timely manner. Plus if we decide to go out of town at the last minute I can get my refill in a couple of hours.
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Old 10-08-2018, 09:54 PM
 
6,514 posts, read 4,368,102 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rothbear View Post

Someone asked about Humana Part D. We have that. It is actually Humana WalMart and have had it for 2 years.

Around here the docs no longer give out paper prescriptions so it's easy for them to electronically send it to WM. Frankly I would prefer it this way unless there was a huge price difference. I don't trust the PO/FX/UPS to get it to me in a timely manner. Plus if we decide to go out of town at the last minute I can get my refill in a couple of hours.
If anyone is interested in the Humana Walmart Part D Prescription Plan's Home Delivery of 90-day supply, it comes like clockwork in the U.S. mail when you place an order at their website, there is no delay, and it's very reliable. Physicians also electronically send prescriptions directly to Humana Walmart Part D Home Delivery system.

Humana Walmart has often been the least expensive stand-alone Part D Prescription Drug plan in the entire U.S.. It was $12.80 per month a few years ago, then went to $15 per month, then $18, and for 2018 it is $20.80. Goes up a little bit for 2019.

(and yes, I know that people living in very hot climates do not want to use Home Delivery through the U.S. mail (USPS) because of the heat.)

Last edited by matisse12; 10-08-2018 at 10:08 PM..
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Old 10-08-2018, 09:56 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ and Redwood City, CA
11,065 posts, read 7,223,662 times
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Wait, I thought the supplement (Medigap) plans were standardized and it didn't matter what entity you bought it through. Is this not true?

In 47 states, there are 10 standardized Medicare Supplement insurance plans that are denoted by the letters A through N (plans E, H, I, and J are no longer sold).


Each Medicare Supplement insurance plan offers a different level of basic benefits, but each lettered plan must include the same standardized basic benefits regardless of insurance company and location. For example, Medicare Supplement Plan G in Florida includes the same basic benefits as Plan G in North Dakota. Please note that if you live in Massachusetts, Minnesota, or Wisconsin, your Medicare Supplement insurance plan options are different than in the rest of the country.


https://www.ehealthinsurance.com/med...pplement-plans

So why would it make any difference if you went through AARP or bought Plan F from United Healthcare, other than the fact that it is Community Rated?
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Old 10-08-2018, 10:43 PM
JRR
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
5,503 posts, read 3,200,715 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wildflowers27 View Post
My mother has had the AARP United Healthcare "F" Plan for many years. It has been flawless and a joy to deal with (I handle her paperwork). She's had cancer surgeries (inpatient and outpatient), several hospitalizations, heart surgery, emergency admissions, in-hospital and at-home infusions, and countless doctor visits, labs, and scans. Between Medicare and her AARP United Healthcare "F" Plan, they have covered everything and she never has a bill to pay. And no co-pays at the doctor. I can't say enough good about it.

How she found out about it. She had a different supplement, and when my parents moved to the Tucson area, her friend gave her an AARP membership as a gift and said she should use them for her supplement, and that all her friends did. (I find good word-of-mouth to be invaluable). My mother's sister later was complaining about how many medical bills she had, even though she had a supplement. She then switched to AARP/United Healthcare and was thrilled they picked up everything and no more bills.

You should know that "F" plans are being closed to new subscribers in 2020, and the closest choice will be the "G" plan. It is identical to the "F" plan except there is a small annual deductible ($183 in 2018). It is what I will be choosing when I am of Medicare age.

The other good thing about the AARP United Healthcare supplement is it is Community Rated, and not Attained Age rated. This means your rate won't go sky high if you live to be really old. Another relative had an Attained Age supplement and I remember looking at the premium bill thinking it was so much more expensive than my mother's.

For her drug/pharmacy "Part D", I shop this each year on Medicare.gov during Open Enrollment (which starts next week). I plug in all her drugs and then choose the best plan. It is a bit of a nuisance to change each year, but the savings have been considerable. Last year was Humana; this year changed to Express Scripts. The plans' drug formularies and prices change every year, so it is worthwhile to plug it all into Medicare.gov if you have anything other than basic generic drugs. I hope this helps.



I just ran my prescriptions through the Medicare website and I get to change my plan, yet again. I turned 65 in 2014 and next year will be my seventh prescription plan. I save $280 in 2019 by switching and get to go back to the pharmacy abut a mile from my house, where I picked up my prescriptions in 2017 before changing. This year it is with Aetna and next year will be Cigna.

What a crazy system!
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Old 10-08-2018, 11:50 PM
 
312 posts, read 170,391 times
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JRR- It is a crazy system! Musical chairs. And the doctors offices and pharmacies all have to update their systems with your new Part D info each year. Time consuming. But at least you get to switch back to the closer pharmacy in 2019.
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Old 10-09-2018, 12:29 AM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,700 posts, read 26,637,044 times
Reputation: 37677
AARP insurance is a total rip-off. I recently had to file a lawsuit to just get what they should have given me from The Hartford/AARP renters insurance. And, when I looked for a replacement, I was able to get more coverage for less than half what AARP/The Hartford had been charging me.

AARP is a total rip-off, only about profits, and definitely not the cheapest option, or the option with decent customer service.

My advice is to keep shopping, to put it mildly.


And, don't waste any money on a AARP membership, which is just another way for them to get your money, and rip you off.
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