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Old 10-19-2010, 03:25 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,417 posts, read 32,608,882 times
Reputation: 15560

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryleeII View Post
Oh, really? Usually "the doctor" is the one encouraging the giggles. They are playing to their audience, the students, who follow his lead.
Quote:
Originally Posted by kshe95girl View Post
How many years have you been in the medical field?
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryleeII View Post
Did you mean me? I've been a "patient" for about 30 years, worked at various ancillary jobs, such as aide, unit clerk, etc. My main experience has been as a patient, not sure if that's what you mean.
Yes, I was asking you.
In the first quoted statement, its sounds as though you spent years following the Docs around as they were training the residents.
Hmmmmmm.......
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Old 10-19-2010, 03:27 PM
 
Location: Manhattan, Ks
1,280 posts, read 6,329,399 times
Reputation: 1809
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryleeII View Post
Oh, really? Usually "the doctor" is the one encouraging the giggles. They are playing to their audience, the students, who follow his lead.
This sounds...unlikely. If this is happening you need to report it. It is not the norm.
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Old 10-19-2010, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,417 posts, read 32,608,882 times
Reputation: 15560
Quote:
Originally Posted by kansas sky View Post
This sounds...unlikely. If this is happening you need to report it. It is not the norm.
Thats what I was getting at.
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Old 10-19-2010, 03:38 PM
 
9,940 posts, read 16,545,479 times
Reputation: 16812
Quote:
Originally Posted by kshe95girl View Post
Yes, I was asking you.
In the first quoted statement, its sounds as though you spent years following the Docs around as they were training the residents.
Hmmmmmm.......

No, I was never a medical student following the doctor around. I've been the patient, for many years, I'm talking from that perspective.

I developed RA (rheumatoid arthritis) at a young age. many people do. RA is quite different from OA (osteoarthritis), or, Grandma's arthritis. I also tend to look younger than I am. Many times I've been the butt of a joke, as "the doctor" comes in with his entourage and makes some comment on that. "Well, Grandma, how are you doing today"? questions like that. I've even been challenged by doctors, oh, you're too young to have arthritis
even though RA primarily strikes children and young adults.

Its really sad when the patient has to educate "the doctor". RA usually manifests before age 40, its not a disease of aging, and I'm NOT your Grandma!
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Old 10-19-2010, 03:47 PM
 
9,940 posts, read 16,545,479 times
Reputation: 16812
Well, just wanted to give a perspective from the patient's point of view to anyone in the medical profession.

Patients oftentimes have endured much stress and trauma by the time they even get to the doctor. They have a difficult problem that doesn't resolve, are seeking medical care. perhaps they have gone to many other doctors, by the time they reach a major medical center they're pretty stressed over their condition or they wouldn't be there. Regardless of how they look, they have a problem or they wouldn't be there to begin with.

Also, they have put a lot of time, money, and effort into just getting there. Time off from work, school, distance driving, gas, parking, tolls, oftentimes overnight hotels, etc. Then usually they're left sitting there wearing paper for at least an hour (no self-respecting doctor sees a patient without at least an hour's wait, that would make the patient feel like they were somehow of some value). Then to walk in and crack some joke, well, its too much for some patients. In most medical settings, the patient is the lowest form of life. Think about it---who is kept waiting, put on hold, transferred around, jerked around, mocked, belittled, overbilled, undertreated, and expected to somehow take it all in stride? Then don't even bother to give them what they came for---last visit, doctor ran off and didn't sign half the perscriptions he'd written, some for controlled substances. I had to raise a fuss and refused to pay for the visit until someone signed the da**ned things!
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Old 10-19-2010, 05:55 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 18,538,734 times
Reputation: 6733
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryleeII View Post
I find talking in front of groups difficult, to say the least. I've had severe trauma while "forced' to speak in front of groups, such as school projects,l etc. It was so bad I just declined any public speaking aspects of my last jobs, I simply told my teamates I'd rather devote my energies to something I could do, I simply couldn't do public presentations.

Which makes it extremely difficult for me to go to any type of teaching hospital. Usually they never ask, just burst upon you with 10-20 giggling medical students, writing in notebooks, staring at you like some sort of freak, and analyzing your every move. I've found it simply impossible to communicate with the "doctor" in such a setting. And, BTW, Newsflash---you PAY in a teaching hospital, the same if not more than a private doctor. In consideration of the fact that patients are paying customers and their feelings should be considered, you should at least be asked permission first, and given a chance to say NO. But it never works out that way.


I've been having neurological problems for the last several months, including balance and coordination issues. I've been round and round with doctors, and no diagnosis, let alone treatment. Now they want to refer me to a teaching hospital for a 3 day workup, includes every test in the book (and probably every $ in my bank account). I hesitate to go, simply because I can't abide the thought of being stared at by giggling medical students for 3 straight days. I'm looking for another referral, to a private clinic. I just explained to my doctor that, although this referral might provide good data, I think the same date can be obtained without traumatizing me. I'm starting to agree with some of the posters on this thread. However, in an emergency setting, any modesty would have to fly out the window.
Marylee - I've read all your messages. I can't say no one ever has a bad experience in a medical setting. At age 63 - I don't know how many medical encounters I've had. But my basic attitude with regard to doctors (and plumbers for that matter) is one strike and you're out.

I think it's best for you to concentrate on yourself right now. You apparently aren't really young - or really old either. Maybe 40ish or so? And neurological stuff is a real PITA to deal with (my husband was diagnosed with MS when he was 35 - neurology has about 300 diseases - most are hard to diagnose - and doctors can't do squat about most of them even when they're diagnosed). Plus - if you're talking about balance and coordination problems - it could well be an "ear" type thing as opposed to a neurological thing. I once - when I was about your age - got an odd condition called vestibular neuronitis. Made me dizzy. Had to walk through the supermarket hanging onto a shopping cart. It was a benign self-limiting condition that generally clears up in 6 months (and mine did).

Not saying you have that. Or anything like that. But if I were having your symptoms - my first stop would be a really good ENT person. And then if the ENT ruled out ear stuff (and the ENT person will probably order some kind of brain MRI to rule out something like a tumor) - I'd go on to the neurology people.

Just curious what teaching hospitals you've dealt with. I've been a patient in Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami and Mayo JAX - both teaching hospitals - and found both to be respecting of me as a patient.

Also - FWIW - a lot of "big city" teaching hospitals - like Shands here in JAX - are ridiculously expensive. Much more expensive than - for example - Mayo JAX. Because any paying patient is paying for 3 indigent patients. Something to keep in mind when you're shopping for medical care. Robyn

P.S. I am not a doctor and anything I say here is a totally non-professional opinion.
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Old 10-19-2010, 06:05 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 18,538,734 times
Reputation: 6733
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryleeII View Post
Well, just wanted to give a perspective from the patient's point of view to anyone in the medical profession.

Patients oftentimes have endured much stress and trauma by the time they even get to the doctor. They have a difficult problem that doesn't resolve, are seeking medical care. perhaps they have gone to many other doctors, by the time they reach a major medical center they're pretty stressed over their condition or they wouldn't be there. Regardless of how they look, they have a problem or they wouldn't be there to begin with.

Also, they have put a lot of time, money, and effort into just getting there. Time off from work, school, distance driving, gas, parking, tolls, oftentimes overnight hotels, etc. Then usually they're left sitting there wearing paper for at least an hour (no self-respecting doctor sees a patient without at least an hour's wait, that would make the patient feel like they were somehow of some value). Then to walk in and crack some joke, well, its too much for some patients. In most medical settings, the patient is the lowest form of life. Think about it---who is kept waiting, put on hold, transferred around, jerked around, mocked, belittled, overbilled, undertreated, and expected to somehow take it all in stride? Then don't even bother to give them what they came for---last visit, doctor ran off and didn't sign half the perscriptions he'd written, some for controlled substances. I had to raise a fuss and refused to pay for the visit until someone signed the da**ned things!
Reading this - I feel bad for you. I have been there - very occasionally - but never more than once with a particular doctor. A doctor treats me the way some of your doctors have treated you - I'm history.

I don't think you've mentioned where you live. But I can tell you that in my small part of the world in City-Data - the JAX FL forum - peeople are always asking for doctor recommendations - and getting advice. Perhaps you should give that a try. Robyn
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Old 10-19-2010, 07:20 PM
 
Location: Saint Petersburg, FL
1,881 posts, read 3,215,877 times
Reputation: 16531
Quote:
Originally Posted by stan4 View Post
That's funny. I don't remember anyone ever giggling in consults the whole time I was in medical school. Even a weird look on your face would earn you an earful in the director's office.
I have never experienced giggling. But, I VERY clearly remember sitting with my oldest daughter, who was no more than a year at the time, in a room in the hospital while the doctor and all the students marched in. She began having a seizure, and half of them discussed she and I as if we were not there. The other half stood with mouths hanging open. No one made any attempt to speak to me whatsoever, including the doctor... I sat there with tears streaming down my cheeks; my baby was having a seizure!

Then they all filed out without a word. One of the students came back in after the others had left, put his hand on my shoulder and said, "I'm so sorry". That one is the one who is a good doctor now.
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Old 10-20-2010, 06:27 PM
 
9,940 posts, read 16,545,479 times
Reputation: 16812
Ok, now I know what to do---when they stare at me like a freak, stare back and give them a show! do something weird, like pick your nose, and really mess up their reports!


LOL just kidding!
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Old 10-20-2010, 07:26 PM
 
Location: Mostly in my head
19,865 posts, read 57,901,167 times
Reputation: 19182
Nothing wrong with standing up for yourself and telling the doc you want the students out.

I specified on a surgery consent that no interns would work on me altho' they could observe.
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