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Old 05-01-2016, 07:54 PM
 
Location: Ohio
5,626 posts, read 5,389,890 times
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Not a concern about modesty here.
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Old 05-02-2016, 07:13 AM
 
3,094 posts, read 1,199,120 times
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Originally Posted by Ottawa2011 View Post
It all comes down to an individual's comfort zone. There are personal care workers, even hospital orderlies, who don't have extensive medical school training, and they assist with patients in various states of undress. Maybe some patients are more comfortable with health care staff who have experience. Just my opinion, but, a young female nurse who has experience from nursing school (not to mention maybe babysitting and changing diapers, etc.), yes, she'll be as clinical and detached as anyone else... it's all just body parts. I think a health care worker would get desensitized pretty fast.

Some women prefer female OB/GYNs, but I don't care. That's a bit invasive though, and not really like standard nudity in a medical setting.
Except when it is not just body parts to her. Though it was irrelevant to any work she had to do the young RN still decided commenting on the status of my testicles was somehow relevant. Maybe in her mind it was clinical and detached to casually comment on whatever flaws she observed in her patient's anatomy. Maybe she just skipped the class on proper bedside manners. I'll never know which it was but in either event I have no doubt but that she didn't mean to humiliate me. However speaking as the patient it was totally uncalled for and unprofessional. At the time I was too shocked to ask her why she did that and in retrospect attributed it to her not being mature enough to handle seeing anything outside of the norm as concerns men.

I know that some young people have maturity beyond their years and that others have the professionalism thing down pat right out of school or their training programs, but not all do. Being self conscious as I am about this one aspect of my anatomy I am just going to have my guard up when encountering young healthcare workers in intimate exposure situations. If I have a choice I'll go with men or with older women for such care, especially if dealing with staff at the LNA/CNA level. Their training programs are so perfunctory that it is a stretch to think they are true medical professionals after a couple months in a classroom.
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Old 05-03-2016, 11:03 AM
 
11 posts, read 10,785 times
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Hello:

Back in the day when people never thought to even question a diagnosis, test, or procedure let alone what a doctor or nurse told you, doctors and nurses basically had free reign as everyone at the time thought their word was “God”.

For the longest time, the medical profession had the wool pulled over their patients eyes. Whatever they said had to be done was done for the most part without the patient ever questioning why.

Why not, at the time, everyone thought these people were untouchable. They know all about the human body and its intricacies.

Who were we to question them?

We put nurses and doctors along with policemen and firemen up on a pedestal and the perception of all that power went to a lot of people’s heads.

Then times began to change and the social media wave hit the country like nothing before it.

Doctors who were all long making mistakes but were able to keep them out of the news, couldn’t hide anymore. They had their mistakes published on the front page of the newspaper.

Nurses who found it more fun to take indecent liberties against their patients rather than be advocates for them had their faces plastered all over the newspaper, facebook and twitter.

Mikala I have to disagree with women rarely talk about a guy’s “junk”. I’ve been in a lot of hospitals and I’ve here the girls talking amongst themselves in the hallways, at the nursing stations, about patient so and so’s junk. I’ve never heard the guys talk about a woman’s rack though. It’s really rampant in some hospitals.

For instance, in upstate NY at University Hospital, a nurse was recently fired and lost her nursing license for taking pictures of a guy’s junk and distributing it to her colleagues at the hospital.

Authorities had irrefutable proof in their hands and charged her with a felony.

She pled down and only got 3 yrs. probation & community service. If this were a guy he’d be in prison.

Until the criminal justice system says to the medical community this behavior will no longer be tolerated then starts handing out hefty prison sentences to both men and women, I don’t see this stopping.

The public has finally begun though to say enough is enough.

People (with the help of Google), started educating themselves about their own health. They started asking questions on medical issues that before they let the medical “experts” tell them what they to do.

The medical community couldn’t hide anymore behind their cloak of “all knowing”.

People wanted more control over their own healthcare.

The government listened to the people an enacted the HIPPA laws and rules to protect each individual. It was a starting point.

Now the “Old Guard” (doctors and nurses in the medical facilities that had things their way for years), didn’t like these rules and are still fighting today to keep “old way” of doing things because they would get to stay on their power trip.

Suzy, you are correct in that there should be more opportunities for men in healthcare.

Problem here is medical facilities right now can and will hire a woman over a man whether she is equally or better qualified or not no questions asked. The “old guard” still has a lock on hiring.

There are many male nurses and sonographers out their looking for positions that they are fully qualified for but when they apply for the position, facilities are telling them females only need apply.

If the “old guard” won’t let go of the “old ways”, then it’s time for new labor laws to be enacted to get more men into the healthcare field.

When a woman goes for her annual mammogram, what are the chances, she will have to deal with a male mammographer doing the x-ray?

Zero to none.

A urologist wants his male patient to get a scrotal ultrasound. The patient for his own reasons, wants the test done by a male sonographer not a female.

What do you think the chances are he will get his request for a male granted?

Zero to one tenth of one percent chance.

Ottawa you also are correct, it all does comes down to an individual's comfort zone.

Problem is the “old guard” in the medical community and men that won't speak up because they are afraid of being seen as weak.

Hospitals refuse to acknowledge that fact that some men coming into their facilities would be more comfortable with male caregivers than female caregivers. Guys, you have to get past this fear & speak up went you go in. Tell them you want male caregivers. It's your right.


Healthcare has moved to a patient-centered system. It's about choice now.



Under this system, the goal of the healthcare provider should always be to give each patient the best outcome possible from their stay.

That being said, it’s time for the medical community to get over itself and acknowledge there are men out there that have modesty issues and it’s up to the hospitals to make these individuals feel safe when they come to the hospital so that the patient can have the best possible outcome from his stay.



Maybe that means asking patients when they are admitted or if they are scheduling a diagnostic test, do you prefer same gender caregivers?


And if that means medical facilities and doctors’ offices have to hire more men into positions traditionally held by women, you do it!


It’s no longer about you or your bottom line. It’s about good patient outcomes. You can’t have good outcomes if your patients are worried about who will be their caregiver.

I checked around me and the closest male sonographer to my location is 80 miles away. That’s unacceptable.

It’s time to stop saying that people with modesty issues have problems and they need to just get over it or see a psychiatrist.

We all have problems. Should we all go see the psychiatrist? I think not.

Instead, let’s all sit down together and start finding some constructive answers to these issues.

Together, there isn’t any problem that cannot be overcome.


The better the care a patient receives, the better the review and recommendation the facility will get in return which could mean more patients bringing in more revenue.


Regards,
Soul
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Old 05-03-2016, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Alexandria, VA
11,985 posts, read 21,265,788 times
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WAY too long to read.
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Old 05-03-2016, 05:39 PM
 
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Soulstealer, yes more men are needed and yes men who want male nurses & techs need to speak up. In the short term those requests aren't going to be always be possible to fulfill but if you ask then at least the message will start to be received that there is a need for more men in healthcare positions.

That said, in my experience there has been a significant transition over the past decade or more as concerns respecting male modesty. I have been treated very respectfully again and again by women nurses & techs without my having to say anything. Yes there are some out there who still don't get it but they have become the exception rather than the norm. I know that being treated respectfully by women nurses & techs isn't going to be the same for modest men as would be having male nurses & techs but they are not purposely trying to make men feel uncomfortable or embarrassed. Quite the opposite actually. In the old days it didn't even occur to most that men needed any privacy consideration but those days are long gone.
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Old 05-03-2016, 05:44 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
25,136 posts, read 30,041,038 times
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Anyone who is treated less than respectfully in a medical setting should speak up. If the nurse does not close the door or the curtain, speak up. If it is not necessary to uncover your nether regions to do the exam or procedure, speak up if someone does it.

Also, just about every hospital these days will send you a form or card to fill out about your satisfaction with your experience. Fill it out and send it back. Those are taken seriously, by the way.
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Old 05-03-2016, 09:33 PM
 
Location: Middle of the ocean
34,984 posts, read 22,029,902 times
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You have the right to speak up, or put a stop to something that is happening. I see nothing wrong with requesting staff of whatever gender you are comfortable with if you do not mind that it may delay service and response time.

I know quite a few guys in the health field, and by "know" I mean the many times I've been receiving medical care a lot of time it has been a guy, from nurses to medical techs.
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Old 05-05-2016, 06:03 PM
 
3,094 posts, read 1,199,120 times
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Originally Posted by Mikala43 View Post
OP: hope it's all benign
My apologies for a quick diversion from the main topic but I got a letter from the colonoscopy doc today. I had 5 polyps and the largest of them was pre-cancerous. Doc says come back in a year for another colonoscopy. So as to get a 2nd opinion, this evening I sent the results to a colon cancer specialist my wife has had some dealings with at another hospital. At issue is the doc says he can't be 100% sure he removed the entire pre-cancerous polyp given its size & type and the fact that it came out in 3 pieces. Also, I've had colon cancer in the family, had bladder cancer myself and otherwise have had various cancers rip through the family, so I am cautious when the c word comes up.

Now back to your regular programming. Guys, do not let your modesty keep you from getting colonoscopies. The nurses are only going to see your butt and in most of our cases, the days of it being a thrill for anyone are long gone. Colon cancer is very treatable and even avoidable if found early such as the situation I am in.
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Old 05-05-2016, 08:48 PM
 
Location: Middle of the ocean
34,984 posts, read 22,029,902 times
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Thank you for sharing all of this. I'm sure this has caused many a reader to get off their bum () and make that appointment.
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Old 05-05-2016, 09:19 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
25,136 posts, read 30,041,038 times
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Originally Posted by Mikala43 View Post
Thank you for sharing all of this. I'm sure this has caused many a reader to get off their bum () and make that appointment.
DH and I are both due. Just need to get it scheduled.
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