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Old 08-11-2010, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Mostly in my head
19,865 posts, read 57,975,738 times
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Water exercises are a great way to build core strength and flexibility. Not sure if there is a public pool where you live? Many have exercise classes. Water gives you 12 x the resistance of air but supports you so you don't get sore. I am in a class for older/disabled people and it has done wonders for me!
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Old 08-11-2010, 11:15 AM
 
3,627 posts, read 13,149,077 times
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And the sodium! it is easy enough to experiment with cutting it back to less than about 1500mg a day for a few weeks by logging all your foods and checking then seeing whether or not it has an impact. For the the impact was profound -but it is NOT for many folks (just like sensitivity to caffeine seems to vary)

caloriecount.com, nutritiondata.com, the daily plate - all have free counters that will do the math for you.
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Old 08-11-2010, 11:50 AM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
25,320 posts, read 30,140,673 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grannysroost View Post
Last week I had my BP checked at a dentist office and it was 175 over 120...the poor assistant kept checking because neither of us believed it, needless to say it just went higher...

I came home and started researching, hubby bought a BP monitor...

I now need to quit drinking any alcohol, quit smoking (I know), exercise on a daily basis and change my diet totally...oh did I say cut back on stress with the aforementioned.

I don't want to do meds if at all possible so I am on a mission. I have been drinking water, about 2.5 to 3 quarts a day (dehydration) and they would have probably given me a diuretic BP med for one of them, and I now have it down to 140s over 90s. Hit the treadmill today for 30 minutes...went grocery shopping and tried to stay on the outside aisles with yogurt, fruit, fresh veggies, etc. We don't eat bad, but I love gravies, homemade creamed soups, a lot of not so good things tossed in (bacon, cheese...).

Sorry for the long post, but has anyone else done this or tried without meds and succeeded? What did you do? Did I mention cutting stress with all of the above...
Granny ~

Take a look at the New American Heart Association Cookbook. You can have your gravies and soups! As others have noted, sodium intake is the biggest dietary factor in controlling high BP. Many doctors recommend the DASH diet: DASH diet: Healthy eating to lower your blood pressure - MayoClinic.com. The cookbook helps turn the DASH into meals the whole family can eat. The recipes taste good! And note that DASH allows for one alcoholic beverage a day. Just do not have a cigarette with that glass of wine! You do not want to fall into the trap of preparing one meal for yourself and another for everyone else at the table. That makes you feel deprived. If Granny's going to eat healthy, everyone is going to eat healthy!

Don't overdo the water. You can mess up your blood electrolytes. See here: The Mythical Daily Water Requirement .
Of course, you may need to adjust for exercise and humidity levels. When exercising, don't wait for thirst to tell you to drink.

In my opinion, quitting smoking should be the highest priority on your list. Every time you smoke, you are causing small blood vessels to constrict. See here; High Blood Pressure and Smoking .

There is more at the WebMD hypertension site, also.
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Old 08-11-2010, 12:00 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
25,320 posts, read 30,140,673 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
My mother started taking L-Arganine (it's a natural amino acid) and it helped.

20yrsinBranson
See here about L-arginine: L-arginine: Does it lower blood pressure? - MayoClinic.com .
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Old 08-11-2010, 12:15 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
25,320 posts, read 30,140,673 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
By the way, Granny, I don't know how old you are, but until recently, the first number of your blood pressure could be as high as your age plus 100 and the doctors did not get concerned about it. It is a natural reaction to the aging process. Due to the fact that your circulatory system looses elasticity when you age, your heart has to push a little harder to compensate. In order to get enough blood (and oxygen) to your brain.

If you are under 65, then I might be a *tiny* bit concerned (but not much), but if you are over 65 it shouldn't even be a consideration.

Nobody has died from blood pressure that is 175 over 120.

20yrsinBranson
Well, yes, people do die with blood pressures of 175/120. The higher the blood pressure, the higher the risk of heart attack and stroke. See here for stroke risk compared to blood pressure: Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Risk -- The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure -- NCBI Bookshelf and here for heart attack: Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Risk -- The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure -- NCBI Bookshelf . Note that 175/120 is off the chart!!!!!!!!!

You want your blood pressure as low as you can get it without passing out when you stand up, regardless of age!

Last edited by suzy_q2010; 08-11-2010 at 12:17 PM.. Reason: correct typo
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Old 08-11-2010, 01:57 PM
 
Location: Tucson
42,835 posts, read 80,646,934 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
By the way, Granny, I don't know how old you are, but until recently, the first number of your blood pressure could be as high as your age plus 100 and the doctors did not get concerned about it. It is a natural reaction to the aging process.
Exactly! The normal ranges of everything have been changed so the drug mafia can peddle more of their crack. Besides, all these perfect numbers apply to a perfectly healthy 18-year old.
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Old 08-11-2010, 02:28 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,849 posts, read 31,214,735 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
Well, yes, people do die with blood pressures of 175/120. The higher the blood pressure, the higher the risk of heart attack and stroke. See here for stroke risk compared to blood pressure: Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Risk -- The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure -- NCBI Bookshelf and here for heart attack: Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Risk -- The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure -- NCBI Bookshelf . Note that 175/120 is off the chart!!!!!!!!!

You want your blood pressure as low as you can get it without passing out when you stand up, regardless of age!
I am not certain what these graphs really mean, and I would wager that if you were pressed to fully explain them, you might be at a bit of a loss as well. Unless of course, you are a doctor or a research analyist or something like that. For instance, what on earth is a "floating absolute risk"? What in the heck does that mean anyway?

If high blood pressure was the sole component in risk of stroke or IHD mortality, then theoretically the numbers would be across the board for the same risk level at all age groups, but it is not. Therefore, we can only assume that there are other factors at play rather than JUST hypertension. Therefore, how can we be certain that it is not those OTHER FACTORS that are causing the problems? We cannot. Again you have that old correlation versus causation argument.

Perhaps exposure to Depends causes strokes. After all, I'm certain that far more people aged 80-89 wear them than people 50-59. Perhaps it is laxitives - maybe it is GREAT GRAND CHILDREN. There are far, far, far, too many variables involved to be able to point and one cause and one cause only. To restrict a hypothesis to such a limited point of view shows bias, if you ask me.

It reminds me of that old "Bread Is Dangerous" thing....

http://www.ambrosiasw.com/forums/lof...hp/t27567.html

Personally, I would rather have a little high blood pressure and be able to remember what my name is and where I live, than have 120/80, but hey, that's just me. LOL

20yrsinBranson
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Old 08-11-2010, 03:10 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
25,320 posts, read 30,140,673 times
Reputation: 31528
Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
I am not certain what these graphs really mean, and I would wager that if you were pressed to fully explain them, you might be at a bit of a loss as well. Unless of course, you are a doctor or a research analyist or something like that. For instance, what on earth is a "floating absolute risk"? What in the heck does that mean anyway?

If high blood pressure was the sole component in risk of stroke or IHD mortality, then theoretically the numbers would be across the board for the same risk level at all age groups, but it is not. Therefore, we can only assume that there are other factors at play rather than JUST hypertension. Therefore, how can we be certain that it is not those OTHER FACTORS that are causing the problems? We cannot. Again you have that old correlation versus causation argument.

Perhaps exposure to Depends causes strokes. After all, I'm certain that far more people aged 80-89 wear them than people 50-59. Perhaps it is laxitives - maybe it is GREAT GRAND CHILDREN. There are far, far, far, too many variables involved to be able to point and one cause and one cause only. To restrict a hypothesis to such a limited point of view shows bias, if you ask me.

It reminds me of that old "Bread Is Dangerous" thing....

Ambrosia Software Web Board > Bread is Evil!

Personally, I would rather have a little high blood pressure and be able to remember what my name is and where I live, than have 120/80, but hey, that's just me. LOL

20yrsinBranson

In simple terms, the older you are and the higher your blood pressure is, the more likely you are to die from a heart attack or a stroke. The "floating relative risk" accounts for other factors, although I expect it does not include
great grandchildren or bread!
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Old 08-11-2010, 03:12 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
25,320 posts, read 30,140,673 times
Reputation: 31528
Quote:
Originally Posted by sierraAZ View Post
Exactly! The normal ranges of everything have been changed so the drug mafia can peddle more of their crack. Besides, all these perfect numbers apply to a perfectly healthy 18-year old.


Well, the normal ranges were changed because though were the numbers healthy people had, regardless of age.
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Old 08-11-2010, 04:53 PM
 
3,627 posts, read 13,149,077 times
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I believe the relationship is more than just correlation but that high blood pressure forces the walls to expand more than they are capable of and causes stress cracks in the plaque lining most peoples arteries and the body sees a "break" in a vessel and decides to form a clot to repair it. The body "thinks" you are bleeding and needs to be stopped. Now if you have HBP and it is not due to plaque build up and stiffening of arteries then maybe the damage is simply more chronic - it is hard on the kidneys for instance.
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