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Old 09-14-2010, 12:22 PM
 
Location: NJ
12,631 posts, read 22,581,050 times
Reputation: 11538

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cupcake77 View Post
I agree with the statement, why does it matter who said it? If I agreed with you, would it be better? Is your opinion more valid than his or mine? you're just some (fill in the blank) person on the internet.


My doctor I was seeing for 4 years had benicar notepads, calenders, and gave me free samples of that horrid drug all the time. I kept asking for another med because it was not effective and was making me sick. As you know with blood pressure meds, there are many many othes he could have pescribed. oops wait he did prescribe Azor which is made buy the SAME company and pretty much the same drug, just with norvasc added with the benicar.

I went to another doctor and feel much better and normal again on another med. He kept me on a med that was $50 a month, I was sick all the time and I wasn't geting optimal numbers with it. yes I think something was very wrong.
I agree. I asked my daughters doctor to let her try effexor because it worked on my hub & other people I know & was told no, the drug is crap. He likes to prescribe meds that I see pens, paper & clip boards for in his office..

Quote:
Originally Posted by ToucheGA View Post
I guess I need to say this again. This practive has been completely banned by The Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) for over two years. Meals for educational sessions, etc. are still allowed, but the guidelines in the United States are becoming more restrictive as time goes by.
If giving advertising stuff is illegal; why do so many doctors have so much advertising stuff? I know the stuff is new just by what medication is advertised....

edit page 2 of your article - Scientific rigidity aside, there is some leeway in the code as to what kinds of products can be used in marketing campaigns. “The real strict [guidelines] are for what the pharmaceutical rep gives the doctor,” said Shevin-Sandy. “The ones that go out to the patient, they’re a little bit more lenient. You can still use a pen if it’s in a jotter, like a patient-care kit, so the patient has a little journal to write down when they took their medication or how they’re feeling or whatever they need to keep track of.” In addition, promotional items can provide necessary education and support. She pointed to an injection kit that helps patients recall the correct way to administer shots once at home and away from a doctor’s supervision.

Last edited by Roselvr; 09-14-2010 at 12:39 PM..

 
Old 09-14-2010, 12:55 PM
 
Location: NJ
12,631 posts, read 22,581,050 times
Reputation: 11538
Pharmaceutical Promotional Items (http://www.thebestpromotionalproducts.com/pharmaceutical-promotional-items.html - broken link) - Under the new terms of this voluntary code, which took effect January 2009, PhRMA proposes that all non-educational products including pharmaceutical promotional items of minimal value such as pens, notepads, mugs and similar reminder items should not be offered to healthcare professionals or members of their staff, even if they are accompanied by patient or physician educational materials.

However, PhRMA will continue to support the distribution of items designed primarily for the education of patients or healthcare professionals if they are not of substantial value ($100 or less) and do not have value to the healthcare professional outside of his or her professional responsibilities

Clarifying the Code

* This code is not a law or bill put forth by any legislative body.
* It is not a crime for pharmaceutical manufacturers and researchers to distribute promotional products to physicians.
* Compliance with this code is voluntary; there are no penalties for non-compliance.
* Company adherence to the code is expected to be fostered by the scrutiny of the press and market competitors.
* This code relies on the industry to police itself.
 
Old 09-14-2010, 01:05 PM
 
48,509 posts, read 86,189,012 times
Reputation: 18105
If I were so of those posting I would change my doctor. Seems they think their doctor is not do what is best for them; so why not change.
 
Old 09-14-2010, 01:15 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
25,320 posts, read 30,140,673 times
Reputation: 31528
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roselvr View Post
I agree. I asked my daughters doctor to let her try effexor because it worked on my hub & other people I know & was told no, the drug is crap. He likes to prescribe meds that I see pens, paper & clip boards for in his office..



If giving advertising stuff is illegal; why do so many doctors have so much advertising stuff? I know the stuff is new just by what medication is advertised....

edit page 2 of your article - Scientific rigidity aside, there is some leeway in the code as to what kinds of products can be used in marketing campaigns. “The real strict [guidelines] are for what the pharmaceutical rep gives the doctor,” said Shevin-Sandy. “The ones that go out to the patient, they’re a little bit more lenient. You can still use a pen if it’s in a jotter, like a patient-care kit, so the patient has a little journal to write down when they took their medication or how they’re feeling or whatever they need to keep track of.” In addition, promotional items can provide necessary education and support. She pointed to an injection kit that helps patients recall the correct way to administer shots once at home and away from a doctor’s supervision.

Do you really think that doctors prescribe based on who gives them pens and post-its?

The availability of samples is likely to have a greater effect than the name of a product on a clipboard.

Have you ever accepted samples for a new prescription or used a coupon that let you try a new med for a month before you (or your insurance company) paid for it? Or used a coupon that paid your copay?

Have you ever received a booklet that explained your medical condition?

Have you ever asked for a prescription for a drug you saw advertised on television or in a magazine?

As ToucheGA has pointed out, pharm companies are no longer giving out free pens and post-its. They are allowed to provide educational materials for doctors and patients. They may provide a meal if they present an educational briefing about a product. And, quite frankly, the doctor may hear a spiel for one drug and prescribe a different one.

Finally, for those with insurance, the company's drug formulary trumps everything, unless you are willing to pay out of pocket for the prescription.
 
Old 09-14-2010, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Manhattan, Ks
1,280 posts, read 6,336,999 times
Reputation: 1809
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cupcake77 View Post
I agree with the statement, why does it matter who said it? If I agreed with you, would it be better? Is your opinion more valid than his or mine? you're just some (fill in the blank) person on the internet.
Well from an outside observer it is kind of interesting that about 6 of the initial posts stated that doctors do not get kickbacks and you jumped in and agreed with the one that said they did. If you're so sure, why post the question?

Honestly, I don't work in human medicine so I have no first-hand knowledge either way.
 
Old 09-14-2010, 02:29 PM
 
Location: NJ
12,631 posts, read 22,581,050 times
Reputation: 11538
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
Do you really think that doctors prescribe based on who gives them pens and post-its?

The availability of samples is likely to have a greater effect than the name of a product on a clipboard.

Have you ever accepted samples for a new prescription or used a coupon that let you try a new med for a month before you (or your insurance company) paid for it? Or used a coupon that paid your copay?

Have you ever received a booklet that explained your medical condition?

Have you ever asked for a prescription for a drug you saw advertised on television or in a magazine?

As ToucheGA has pointed out, pharm companies are no longer giving out free pens and post-its. They are allowed to provide educational materials for doctors and patients. They may provide a meal if they present an educational briefing about a product. And, quite frankly, the doctor may hear a spiel for one drug and prescribe a different one.

Finally, for those with insurance, the company's drug formulary trumps everything, unless you are willing to pay out of pocket for the prescription.
If you read my 2nd post - I linked to an article that said it was not a law. Hopefully someone can find a reputable link that says it is.. but nothing I read said it was & it said it was voluntary.

Yes, my insurance trumps what they will pay for & it's usually the cheapest drug. If I want something different, I have to pay the difference or out of pocket 100%. I've had to do this with medication the doctor I mentioned prescribed because my daughters insurance won't pay for what he wants her to take & he won't replace it with something different. Either she gets that or she doesn't, easy as that or I can try to find another doctor; which is what I'm doing but he has to give me a note (with diagnosis & medications) which his secretary isn't sure he'll do

I honestly don't care if they get pens, paper, etc; my daughter likes to take the pens.. but the doctors I've been to are still getting & using pens/paper from some products. I'll have to pay better attention to see what products they are. It's very possible that they are taking apart bundled patient packages; keeping the pens for patients to use while filling out paperwork, then putting any books/literate from it in the rooms.
 
Old 09-14-2010, 02:32 PM
 
Location: NJ
12,631 posts, read 22,581,050 times
Reputation: 11538
Quote:
Originally Posted by kansas sky View Post
Well from an outside observer it is kind of interesting that about 6 of the initial posts stated that doctors do not get kickbacks and you jumped in and agreed with the one that said they did. If you're so sure, why post the question?

Honestly, I don't work in human medicine so I have no first-hand knowledge either way.
I'm not sure what they get if anything but stuff like pens, paper cubes, clip boards can save the doctor out of pocket money for things they use in the office & these days, that could amount to whether they prescribe one medication over the other. I paid $7.50 for a 10 pack of pens last week. That adds up..
 
Old 09-14-2010, 02:59 PM
 
5,337 posts, read 11,508,606 times
Reputation: 13134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roselvr View Post
I'm not sure what they get if anything but stuff like pens, paper cubes, clip boards can save the doctor out of pocket money for things they use in the office & these days, that could amount to whether they prescribe one medication over the other. I paid $7.50 for a 10 pack of pens last week. That adds up..
That is an absurd assertion....

If you really think any doctor is choosing prescriptions based on pens and post it notes received

NO basis in reality....seriously....none
 
Old 09-14-2010, 03:33 PM
 
Location: NJ
12,631 posts, read 22,581,050 times
Reputation: 11538
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluedevilz View Post
That is an absurd assertion....

If you really think any doctor is choosing prescriptions based on pens and post it notes received

NO basis in reality....seriously....none
If you're calling me absurd; there's no reason to personally attack me.

If you read what I said - I said that pens, etc do add up & if some doctors did pick medications because of it; I can understand why because it can save them thousands of dollars. I didn't say I know that they actually do things like that.
 
Old 09-14-2010, 05:47 PM
 
5,337 posts, read 11,508,606 times
Reputation: 13134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roselvr View Post
If you're calling me absurd; there's no reason to personally attack me.

If you read what I said - I said that pens, etc do add up & if some doctors did pick medications because of it; I can understand why because it can save them thousands of dollars. I didn't say I know that they actually do things like that.
Calling an IDEA absurd is a personal attack???

Whatever....

If you really think PENS in a doctors office adds up to THOUSANDS per year, and that free pens somehow influence prescription choices.....well good luck with that.....and I'm sorry, but that is an absurd connection to attempt....
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