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Old 10-04-2010, 08:45 AM
 
713 posts, read 3,201,222 times
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PRK are known to not be as painful as LASIK but take longer to correct your vision. In some cases it can take 3 months for ones eye sight to change while with LASIK you notice changes in less than a day. I for one would find it hard not to rub my eyes for 3 months because of the flap that is removed but you can opt-out of the "can opener" as they call it and have a laser cut a circle out of your eye instead. Still have to wait 3 months and when taking a shower or bath would need to keep the water from washing it out.
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Old 10-04-2010, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
25,201 posts, read 30,070,230 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rgomez912 View Post

YouTube - My Lasik Eye Surgery

After watching this I will never go get laser eye surgery without being put to sleep first

It looks terrible, but they use a topical anesthetic to numb the cornea. It really is not too bad, it's over quickly,and the result was worth it to me.
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Old 10-04-2010, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Sacramento
2,568 posts, read 6,109,371 times
Reputation: 1919
Quote:
Originally Posted by rgomez912 View Post
PRK are known to not be as painful as LASIK but take longer to correct your vision. In some cases it can take 3 months for ones eye sight to change while with LASIK you notice changes in less than a day. I for one would find it hard not to rub my eyes for 3 months because of the flap that is removed but you can opt-out of the "can opener" as they call it and have a laser cut a circle out of your eye instead. Still have to wait 3 months and when taking a shower or bath would need to keep the water from washing it out.
Actually PRK is the more painful option. Changes are immediate too there is just a longer healing time. After a couple of days I could see just fine. Maybe not 20/20 right away but enough to watch TV without glasses. Regarding not rubbing eyes it is not a bad thing to get used to. It sure beats having to wear glasses.
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Old 10-06-2010, 11:01 PM
 
Location: The 719
15,176 posts, read 23,182,442 times
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For those of you who have had LASIK, PRK, PTK, or even old school... RK, and had a good result... I'm happy for you.

For those of you that had the above and had complications or a bad result, I am very sorry for you.

I've seen too many post ops that didn't seem to go well. Some of those folks may have gone on to be happy as can be. But not all.

I honestly don't know what the statistics are, but from what I've seen, the high myopes are the happiest of all and seem to get the best results.

It's the low or not-so myopes who expect to see crystal clear when the surgery is done and they get confused when they now need glasses to read or see the computer.

But like Sookie says, when we get our age (40s - 50s) and start to need "longer arms" to read, our inner lens (not the cornea) is stiffening and will eventually be corrected with a catarac surgery.

But what about complications like dry eye, starbursts, halos, etc? I'm not sold on it. I'm sort of glad I was a bad candidate. I've got astigmatism and would be plano without the astigmatism.

Whatever your prescription is, you have to consider what your overall corneal thickness is, subtract off the prescription, then subtract off the thickness of the micro/hanso blade (from about 130 to 160 micrometers) and hope you have 250 left. If you're a high myop and you don't have 250 left, the doc may just under-treat you a bit on purpose... IDK for sure.

Intralase (letting the laser bubble off the flap instead of a mechanically blade created flap) may not be all that and a bag of chips. In theory, I'm sure it sounds good. Less chance for keratom failure and freecap. This is all a consideration if you're doing LASIK. If you're doing PRK, you don't have to worry about losing that 130 to 160 from the flap creation, don't have to worry about losing Bowman's Layer (have no idea what that means. Do you know?), sands of the Sahara... and perhaps metal artifacts and other contaminations of the cornea, and of course stress to the retina when they put suction to your eye to create the flap.

I'm not all trusting of the surgery just because you have the perfect doctor, the perfect staff, the perfect laser vision elective surgery company, it's a sunny day... they can still screw up or your eye can just do bad things... or the laser can fail. Yet, you can have a bad doctor, a laser falling apart, a horrible staff, a rainy day, and get a "good" result.

But what does 20/20 mean? Does that mean something you'll be happy with? Will you be disappointed to find out that you still need correction... aka glasses... to see near or far? Will you be upset to find out that your new best correctable vision is worse?

I like glasses. I wear them. They're a pain sometimes. I don't like when they get smudged. But better my glass lenses than my cornea. I just don't know about LASIK/PRK. But catarac surgery, I'm all for that.
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Old 10-07-2010, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
25,201 posts, read 30,070,230 times
Reputation: 31332
Quote:
Originally Posted by McGowdog View Post
For those of you who have had LASIK, PRK, PTK, or even old school... RK, and had a good result... I'm happy for you.

For those of you that had the above and had complications or a bad result, I am very sorry for you.

I've seen too many post ops that didn't seem to go well. Some of those folks may have gone on to be happy as can be. But not all.

I honestly don't know what the statistics are, but from what I've seen, the high myopes are the happiest of all and seem to get the best results.

It's the low or not-so myopes who expect to see crystal clear when the surgery is done and they get confused when they now need glasses to read or see the computer.

But like Sookie says, when we get our age (40s - 50s) and start to need "longer arms" to read, our inner lens (not the cornea) is stiffening and will eventually be corrected with a catarac surgery.

But what about complications like dry eye, starbursts, halos, etc? I'm not sold on it. I'm sort of glad I was a bad candidate. I've got astigmatism and would be plano without the astigmatism.

Whatever your prescription is, you have to consider what your overall corneal thickness is, subtract off the prescription, then subtract off the thickness of the micro/hanso blade (from about 130 to 160 micrometers) and hope you have 250 left. If you're a high myop and you don't have 250 left, the doc may just under-treat you a bit on purpose... IDK for sure.

Intralase (letting the laser bubble off the flap instead of a mechanically blade created flap) may not be all that and a bag of chips. In theory, I'm sure it sounds good. Less chance for keratom failure and freecap. This is all a consideration if you're doing LASIK. If you're doing PRK, you don't have to worry about losing that 130 to 160 from the flap creation, don't have to worry about losing Bowman's Layer (have no idea what that means. Do you know?), sands of the Sahara... and perhaps metal artifacts and other contaminations of the cornea, and of course stress to the retina when they put suction to your eye to create the flap.

I'm not all trusting of the surgery just because you have the perfect doctor, the perfect staff, the perfect laser vision elective surgery company, it's a sunny day... they can still screw up or your eye can just do bad things... or the laser can fail. Yet, you can have a bad doctor, a laser falling apart, a horrible staff, a rainy day, and get a "good" result.

But what does 20/20 mean? Does that mean something you'll be happy with? Will you be disappointed to find out that you still need correction... aka glasses... to see near or far? Will you be upset to find out that your new best correctable vision is worse?

I like glasses. I wear them. They're a pain sometimes. I don't like when they get smudged. But better my glass lenses than my cornea. I just don't know about LASIK/PRK. But catarac surgery, I'm all for that.
I am one of the happy ones. The halos are no big deal, and I really do not miss the glasses at all. I am over 60, and I can even read most print without reading glasses.I had some dryness before the procedure, but I passed the tears test in order to be a candidate, and I really do not think the procedure worsened it.

I do wear sunglasses when driving, but I needed them when I wore contacts, too. And the sunglasses may delay the cataract formation.

Of my two sons, one has had LASIK and is happy with it. The other likes the way he looks in glasses and has not.

To each his own, but I think it would be a mistake to deny the procedure to those who are fully informed and want to have it.

Bowman's layer: Bowman's membrane - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 10-07-2010, 07:17 PM
 
Location: The 719
15,176 posts, read 23,182,442 times
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Right. Well you lose Bowman's Layer for good when you have PRK, and your flap never heals, some say, when you have LASIK.

Now, when I've seen retreats which were 90+ days postop, the flap can be peeled back without the need for a new flap creation. It seems like it's fastened back to the stromal bed pretty good. But I've seen a few where it wants to come apart and the patient gets sent home. This situation may be very rare, but not for the poor patient who this happens to.

I'm glad that you can get by with the halos and you don't have painful dry eye.

But... I wouldn't assume this might not happen to someone else.

I've just seen too many not so cool things with this surgery. I knew of a doctor who literally bragged about being the first doctor to perform a corneal transplant in the state. The reason for the need for corneal transplant was probably nothing short of a disaster for the patient. Google or wiki corneal transplant and see what the patient experiences in that situation. Worst case scenerio? Probably. People who have had their eyes messed up by the proceedure do not do well on so many levels, and they are in pain as well. What rights do you really have postop if they mess up? Don't think that doctors don't mess up, either. They do.
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Old 10-07-2010, 07:31 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
25,201 posts, read 30,070,230 times
Reputation: 31332
McGowdog ~

The surgeon I chose was good ---and not inexpensive. He had done the procedure for at least one major league star baseball pitcher. He told me that the folks who have complications are usually the ones who do not follow post-op instructions to the letter. Since I am nothing if not a compliant patient, that was easy for me.

And, as with any surgery, the more the surgeon does, the better s/he gets.
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Old 10-07-2010, 11:22 PM
 
Location: Greenwood Village, Colorado
2,185 posts, read 4,267,183 times
Reputation: 1536
I wear contacts that I wear 24/7 and I take them out overnight 1 x a week... if I am good and remember. I wouldn't consider this procedure, I rather wear my contacts!
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Old 10-08-2010, 09:20 AM
 
Location: The 719
15,176 posts, read 23,182,442 times
Reputation: 14343
I wore contacts for a short time. I was told I had to wear the rigid gas permeables as I was not a candidate for the more comfortable toric lenses.

I looked like I was always sniffing glue or something and it scratched the inside of my eyelids every time I blinked. It was torture.

I suppose that it's cool if you can be comfortable with them and you take care and don't get infection. If you're gonna do LASIK or PRK, you've got to stop wearing those contacts way before the surgery because they literally reshape your cornea for a time, especially the ones I wore.

Now, people who have had a great result after their elective surgery are the reason for the popularity of the surgery. They are happy about the whole thing and tell their friends. But what about those who get a bad result or are not so happy with their procedure? Do we hear so much from them? Why or why not?

The doctor telling the patient to follow the aftercare to the letter is the universal answer? Surely it sounds like a necessity... but is it the end all be all in all aftercare complaints?

Think of the human cornea as a tool... like the fovea of the retina and the optic nerve. Ultimately, the brain is what makes use of all of this. The human body is dynamic and who's to say what the corneal tissue will do after the elective surgery? Is there such a thing as regression? Is there such a thing as higher order abberations? Nobody, including the doctor and the LASER, knows how the human body will respond to the procedure and how it will try to compensate.

There again, I think glasses are cool, but that's just me.

Add: on the vid up above... don't watch the second one no matter what. It's brutal.

Last edited by McGowdog; 10-08-2010 at 10:44 AM..
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