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Old 09-26-2010, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Florida
746 posts, read 1,441,391 times
Reputation: 1179

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I gave up on doctors a long time ago. I have learned as much as I can so that I can monitor my doctor. I'm in tune with my body and pretty well know what is going on here.
I take no X-rays and no prescription drugs.

 
Old 09-26-2010, 11:03 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,017 posts, read 18,375,330 times
Reputation: 32398
Default Short-term versus long-term financial self-interest

Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryleeII View Post
sorry, I don't mean to bash you, but your view of HMO's sound like you lifted it right from their broucheres. Or are you an HMO "salesperson"?

HMO's are the absolute worst type of insurance one could have. They get paid a set amount per month regardless of whether they do one test or twenty, so, how much do you think they will do? and if you think anyone in the mediclal profession is there because they "care" you have really been duped!

The only reason I go to doctors is because I have a medical problem, they're a necessary evil, you have to know how to manage them!
No, I am not a salesperson for anything, much less anything in the medical field. I am speaking of my direct, personal experiences as a member of HMO's for about 40 years. When you talk about them doing one test or 20 you show you don't get it at all. If they save money by doing one test when they ought to do 20, that only saves them money in the short term. If they fail to get at the root of the problem because they didn't do enough tests, then that will cost them more because you'll be back multiple times. They don't take stupid pills. They are smart enough to know their own long-term financial self-interest, which is getting you well quickly. It has nothing to do with "caring" and everything to do with the bottom line, which in this case works out to also be in the patients' interest. If you were a member of the same HMO I am, I guarantee you that you would not be getting the run-around that you have been posting about in such repetitive detail. The lack of sophistication in your thinking is appalling, although I feel sorry for you for the troubles you are having.
 
Old 09-27-2010, 01:48 AM
 
Location: on the edge of Sanity
14,267 posts, read 16,451,921 times
Reputation: 7919
Default Don't give up!

I understand your frustration. I've had such negative experiences with doctors that sometimes I would rather suffer than get treated. However, when the suffering becomes unbearable, you really have no choice.

In May I had a bad fall (long story) and was taken to the hospital in an ambulance. I was admitted on Mon and, after getting an X-ray, was told "There's nothing wrong with you." I couldn't move and had to use a bed pan for days. Hearing "there's nothing wrong with you" when you can't even sit without severe pain is bad enough, but the physical therapists tried to get me to stand up and walk. I began to cry out in agony, so they put me back in bed. I spent 5 miserable days in the hospital, frightened out of my mind. I kept thinking, "What's going to happen to me?" I finally had an MRI that showed a fractured pelvic bone. It's been 4 months since that week and I'm healing well, thank God. I just don't think anyone was really listening to me. I'm very grateful it wasn't more serious, however.

Last edited by justNancy; 09-27-2010 at 01:59 AM..
 
Old 09-27-2010, 11:12 AM
 
Location: Up in the air
19,116 posts, read 27,409,060 times
Reputation: 16277
Try having a rare medical disorder that most doctors have never heard of. My PCP is an idiot, her entire office is full of idiots and she has been zero help at all. I've even been filing my own prescriptions and doing my own referrals for the past 2 years because she can't manage to fill out the paperwork in a remotely timely manner. I fill out the forms, I contact the insurance company on behalf of the doctor and she simply signs the forms. This is something your doctor's office is supposed to do, not the patient. It also shouldn't take 2 months to finally get the doctor to sign the paper to allow you to get a simple blood test to get your thyroid checked. Still to this day whenever I go in she asks me to explain my disorder. Seriously...I'm the only one in the county who has this, one of less than 150 in the entire state....shouldn't be too difficult to remember. Oh, and by 'she' I mean the nurse practicioner....I've never actually met my PCP.

I was shuffled around to 7 specialists before I finally found one who was willing to treat me. When I drove the 7 hours to see her, she and her nurse sat and googled my disorder and chatted about it for 30 minutes while I sat back and read a magazine.

I'm in the middle of 'interviewing' new doctors because it's getting ridiculous. I've had some WONDERFUL doctors in the past...but for the most part I've had horrible ones. Bah.
 
Old 09-27-2010, 11:30 AM
 
Location: EPWV
12,265 posts, read 6,620,545 times
Reputation: 13530
Quote:
Originally Posted by OhZone View Post
I gave up on doctors a long time ago. I have learned as much as I can so that I can monitor my doctor. I'm in tune with my body and pretty well know what is going on here.
I take no X-rays and no prescription drugs.
No x-rays ? You don't go to a dentist? Don't they all do x-rays?
No prescription drugs either. Consider yourself fortunate then.


Not all of us are like that. We wish we were. If you had a disease, it would require constant monitoring. Every 6 months, sometimes more. Follow-up tests, whether blood, MRI's, etc.. are a fact of their lives.

I knew someone who was 30 something and said the same thing, now that they are in their mid-50's, they're taking blood pressure meds.
 
Old 09-27-2010, 11:50 AM
 
1,055 posts, read 2,178,106 times
Reputation: 1222
Quote:
Originally Posted by OhZone View Post
I gave up on doctors a long time ago. I have learned as much as I can so that I can monitor my doctor. I'm in tune with my body and pretty well know what is going on here.
I take no X-rays and no prescription drugs.
You "monitor" your doctor? Is the doc your 5-year old child or something?

Yes, we need to choose our docs carefully, and preventive medicine is the best out there, but by being very phobic of medicine is a problem in itself. There is nothing wrong with x-rays. In fact, the nurses and techs around you have more exposure to them than you ever will. And whether prescription or not, drugs are drugs and either can harm you.

Now, I am not saying monitoring your own body and conditions is bad. We all need to do this, and should be doing this from the start. But demonizing docs and other health care workers?
 
Old 09-27-2010, 12:03 PM
 
9,967 posts, read 16,583,019 times
Reputation: 16907
Quote:
Originally Posted by justNancy View Post
I understand your frustration. I've had such negative experiences with doctors that sometimes I would rather suffer than get treated. However, when the suffering becomes unbearable, you really have no choice.

In May I had a bad fall (long story) and was taken to the hospital in an ambulance. I was admitted on Mon and, after getting an X-ray, was told "There's nothing wrong with you." I couldn't move and had to use a bed pan for days. Hearing "there's nothing wrong with you" when you can't even sit without severe pain is bad enough, but the physical therapists tried to get me to stand up and walk. I began to cry out in agony, so they put me back in bed. I spent 5 miserable days in the hospital, frightened out of my mind. I kept thinking, "What's going to happen to me?" I finally had an MRI that showed a fractured pelvic bone. It's been 4 months since that week and I'm healing well, thank God. I just don't think anyone was really listening to me. I'm very grateful it wasn't more serious, however.

That's almost exactly what happened to me! I fell on night, couldnt' get up, was taken to the hospital. X-rays revealed nothing wrong, they told me to go home!

I couldn't even stand up, and, like us, had to use a bedpan. How could I go home like that! finally they did a cat scan, found a fractured pelvis bone.

A long story ensued, I ended up having a sacroplasty, which is essentially injecting a type of bone putty into the crack to facilitate healing. It healed fine, but I've been having these weird balance and coordination issues since then.

However, I feel the timing is coincidential. MRI's etc, reveal the pelvis healed fine, and I have no pain there. Its something else, and it seems to be getting worse.

but how can they look at someone with a fractured pelivs and tell her to just go home? I was brought in by ambulance, what was i supposed to do, jump up and walk home?
 
Old 09-27-2010, 12:07 PM
 
9,967 posts, read 16,583,019 times
Reputation: 16907
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
No, I am not a salesperson for anything, much less anything in the medical field. I am speaking of my direct, personal experiences as a member of HMO's for about 40 years. When you talk about them doing one test or 20 you show you don't get it at all. If they save money by doing one test when they ought to do 20, that only saves them money in the short term. If they fail to get at the root of the problem because they didn't do enough tests, then that will cost them more because you'll be back multiple times. They don't take stupid pills. They are smart enough to know their own long-term financial self-interest, which is getting you well quickly. It has nothing to do with "caring" and everything to do with the bottom line, which in this case works out to also be in the patients' interest. If you were a member of the same HMO I am, I guarantee you that you would not be getting the run-around that you have been posting about in such repetitive detail. The lack of sophistication in your thinking is appalling, although I feel sorry for you for the troubles you are having.

Sounds like you've found the magic combination---doctors you trust, in a setting that's practical for you. Keep with whatever works!

I'm just saying its not always the case. The one time I dealt with an HMO was a disaster. Every year we have a choioce of an HMO, PPO, or open plan. We always go for the open plan, giving me access to any doctor I chose.
 
Old 09-27-2010, 12:30 PM
 
1,963 posts, read 4,484,152 times
Reputation: 1443
To some extent,yes. Really good Drs are hard to find now a days.
 
Old 09-27-2010, 12:31 PM
 
Location: Bike to Surf!
3,080 posts, read 10,127,480 times
Reputation: 2991
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryleeII View Post
Has anyone else given up on chasing the medical profession?
Nope, I just get my checkups done overseas, and address any non-time-critical complaints when I'm there. If I have a problem in the US, I check the symptoms online. If it seems pretty likely to be something serious and time-critical (it never does), then I might schedule an appointment or go to urgent care if it's very serious, but I'd have a specific idea and complaint of what I wanted the Doctor to check for. That's the cost of capitalism. If you want to save money and time, you've got to DIY as much as you can.

Here's how my overseas Doctor visit went when I thought I might have had a serious issue:

Day 1: Noticed the problem at 9PM, knew even if it was serious it could wait a few days so decided to wait until the morning to check it out.
Day 2: Went to the hospital at 10AM, no appointment. Checked in at the front desk, went upstairs to wait in the exam room lobby.
10:30AM, my number comes up, I go in and talk to the doctor. He examines me and takes my complaint into consideration, tells me everything is normal and suggests a dietary change to make me more comfortable.
10:40, I go downstairs and wait in line for 5 min. to have blood drawn to take care of my yearly blood screening.
By 11:00AM I've finished paying for the appointment and blood panel. Total cost without insurance: $32. Total time taken: 1 hour. If I had made an appointment (online anytime prior to your visit) I could've come in 5 mins before my number would've come up.

Three days later I come back (again, no appointment) hand them my receipt and go see another doctor about the results of my blood test. This visit takes 30 min. start to finish and the cost is included in the original $32.

Now, US medicine is absolutely top-notch for expensive and complicated illnesses and procedures. However, for the day-to-day minor or simple complaints that the majority of people have, it absolutely fails in terms of cost-effectiveness and timeliness.
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