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Old 06-15-2011, 09:59 PM
Status: "Globalist's empire has obviously failed." (set 19 hours ago)
 
Location: Brawndo-Thirst-Mutilator-Nation
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So you take someone who is addicted to something like meth, they can damage their brains.

I have read that one of the ways the brain is damaged with heavy meth use is due to the fact that you have very high surges of Dopamine and Seratonin. These surges eventually damage the receptors designed to uptake these very important chemicals. The receptors actually become insensitive and shrink as a defense mechanism against toxic levels of Dopamin and Seratonin.

So we come to the brain damage caused by high BS levels. The science community now knows that the brain is a insulin sensitive organ. If insulin receptors are constantly exposed to toxic levels of insulin they will shrink and become insensitive to the effects of insulin. I believe that one of the thing being closely looked at is the relation between Cerebral Insulin Resistance and Alzheimer's:

Chronically high blood sugar linked to risk of cognitive impairment | www.ucsf.edu


The authors note that there are a number of possible reasons why chronically high blood sugar may cause cognitive impairment, ranging from the overall effects of diabetic complications to direct and indirect brain damage caused by high blood sugar to a possible association between the enzyme that degrades insulin and the development of Alzheimer’s disease.
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Old 06-16-2011, 09:23 AM
 
Location: Southern Illinois
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That is very interesting and I've heard something about that, and I've heard that some researchers are even calling it type 3 diabetes. It makes sense--diabetes is practically an epidemic in this country and alzheimer's isn't far behind so I'm not surprised the two are connected.

I'm a bit confused though--my mother stopped eating sweets for quite a number of years, though I guess that's no guarantee that you won't get diabetic. But as far as we know, she still has no symptoms of diabetes, and she's getting pretty well along in alzheimer's--it's been a slow progression though-- we've been seeing it coming for at least the last 10 years and she is still able to live alone and drive. I suppose that it's possible that she's had pre-diabetes for a very long time though, and that could explain why she's having problems and why it's been a slow progression. So if this theory is true, the real damage is being done long before a person actually gets diabetes.

Another thing that's interesting though--my maternal g-mother was plump all of her life, from a small child. She was raised on good farm grown food: raw milk, farm eggs, garden produce, fruit they grew, etc. But she was plump. At 5'3" she averaged about 165 lbs for most of her adult life, until she got old and then she shrunk. She should have been at risk for diabetes but her BS was always perfect. My theory is that it's because she never ate junk--she cooked from scratch and ate her own cooking. She never consumed soda, breakfast cereal or Little Debbie oatmeal pies but she did eat too many pies and cakes that she cooked. She also ate a lot of vegetables and she died at 94 with her mind still very much intact.
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Old 06-16-2011, 08:33 PM
Status: "Globalist's empire has obviously failed." (set 19 hours ago)
 
Location: Brawndo-Thirst-Mutilator-Nation
19,719 posts, read 20,360,682 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stepka View Post
That is very interesting and I've heard something about that, and I've heard that some researchers are even calling it type 3 diabetes. It makes sense--diabetes is practically an epidemic in this country and alzheimer's isn't far behind so I'm not surprised the two are connected.

I'm a bit confused though--my mother stopped eating sweets for quite a number of years, though I guess that's no guarantee that you won't get diabetic. But as far as we know, she still has no symptoms of diabetes, and she's getting pretty well along in alzheimer's--it's been a slow progression though-- we've been seeing it coming for at least the last 10 years and she is still able to live alone and drive. I suppose that it's possible that she's had pre-diabetes for a very long time though, and that could explain why she's having problems and why it's been a slow progression. So if this theory is true, the real damage is being done long before a person actually gets diabetes.


Well, the human body is so vast and mysterious, scientists will be figuring thing out about the human body for the next 100000 years.

Here is a possible theory. Maybe your Mother had a Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorder for years and year. Part of her disorder was high insulin levels which are rarely tested for (Glucose/Insulin Ratio is an accurate test for Insulin Resistance). After many years your mothers Cerebral Insulin Receptors became permanently damaged......thus robbing her brain of needed fuel.




Another thing that's interesting though--my maternal g-mother was plump all of her life, from a small child. She was raised on good farm grown food: raw milk, farm eggs, garden produce, fruit they grew, etc. But she was plump. At 5'3" she averaged about 165 lbs for most of her adult life, until she got old and then she shrunk. She should have been at risk for diabetes but her BS was always perfect. My theory is that it's because she never ate junk--she cooked from scratch and ate her own cooking. She never consumed soda, breakfast cereal or Little Debbie oatmeal pies but she did eat too many pies and cakes that she cooked. She also ate a lot of vegetables and she died at 94 with her mind still very much intact.

Did your G-mother lose weight in a healthy way, or did it seem like she was getting sickly as she lost. Maybe her diet did protect her, maybe she did not eat that many carbs???? Or another possibility is that she lost weight because her Pancreas took a dive and could not produce enough insulin??????
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Old 06-16-2011, 10:45 PM
 
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Interesting, thanks for posting. It is not the first time I have heard/read about sugar being connected with Alzheimer's. It seems sugar feeds all kinds of disease in our bodies.
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Old 06-19-2011, 04:43 PM
Status: "Globalist's empire has obviously failed." (set 19 hours ago)
 
Location: Brawndo-Thirst-Mutilator-Nation
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Originally Posted by lifelongMOgal View Post
Interesting, thanks for posting. It is not the first time I have heard/read about sugar being connected with Alzheimer's. It seems sugar feeds all kinds of disease in our bodies.

Yes, but it is just so easy to push a diet filled with the stuff. So many low fat foods are pumped full of junk, including sugar, to make up for the loss of the EVIL fat they removed. Even worse is a sugar filled food that has tons of Frankenfat in it.
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Old 12-05-2011, 04:22 PM
Status: "Globalist's empire has obviously failed." (set 19 hours ago)
 
Location: Brawndo-Thirst-Mutilator-Nation
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ScienceDirect - European Journal of Pharmacology : Glucose, insulin and the brain: modulation of cognition and synaptic plasticity in health and disease: a preface


The brain has long been viewed as an insulin-insensitive organ. Following the demonstration of insulin receptors in the brain, this assumption has been challenged, and a whole new field of research has emerged. Insulin appears to play a role in brain physiology, and disturbances of cerebral insulin signalling and glucose homeostasis are implicated in brain pathology
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Old 12-05-2011, 04:36 PM
 
Location: Up above the world so high!
45,246 posts, read 94,362,885 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tickyul View Post
ScienceDirect - European Journal of Pharmacology : Glucose, insulin and the brain: modulation of cognition and synaptic plasticity in health and disease: a preface


The brain has long been viewed as an insulin-insensitive organ. Following the demonstration of insulin receptors in the brain, this assumption has been challenged, and a whole new field of research has emerged. Insulin appears to play a role in brain physiology, and disturbances of cerebral insulin signalling and glucose homeostasis are implicated in brain pathology
Fascinating! Thanks for posting
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Old 12-05-2011, 05:10 PM
 
Location: Southern Illinois
10,350 posts, read 19,254,992 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tickyul View Post
ScienceDirect - European Journal of Pharmacology : Glucose, insulin and the brain: modulation of cognition and synaptic plasticity in health and disease: a preface


The brain has long been viewed as an insulin-insensitive organ. Following the demonstration of insulin receptors in the brain, this assumption has been challenged, and a whole new field of research has emerged. Insulin appears to play a role in brain physiology, and disturbances of cerebral insulin signalling and glucose homeostasis are implicated in brain pathology
Ah I'd love to read the whole thing but won't part with the 3.99 just now. Still I've been doing a lot of reading on this lately as things have changed drastically for the worse with mother. My theory is that even though she went off sweets, she's been insulin resistant for years b/c her diet has been primarily carb based and she has not cooked for years--hates it in fact--so it's been a lot of processed type foods. The healthiest food she eats is restaurant food and what I cook for her. I took her out for breakfast yesterday and all she would eat was one pancake, even though she got a plate with eggs, bacon, and sausage as well.

I know that one of the theories of why insulin is so damaging to the brain is because an excess causes inflammation and those with higher inflammation ratings from such tests as CRP or trig/HDL ratio have a greater chance of developing most major diseases of modern America--diabetes, heart disease, cancer, and yes, alzheimer's.

Here's the thing too--I don't know that diabetics are at so much greater risk than someone with insulin resistance, which can go on for years and years before diabetes becomes apparent. By then much of the damage is done. And some people will take their diabetic condition quite seriously and lose weight and have better insulin/glucose control than they had before they became diabetic.

So, I have come to the conclusion that the best way to avoid this fate worse than death is to keep the triglyceride and insulin levels as low as possible and that means limiting simple carbs. Exercise of course. Including anti-inflammatory foods such as turmeric and making sure you get all your vitamins. There's more of course, but research is suggesting that this is the best way. I guess what I mean is living your life as if you were scared to death of developing diabetes, b/c in truth, you should be. Gotta tell you--this is hard for me b/c I have such a sweet tooth it's awful but getting more protein in the diet is helping.

Oh, and Tickyul, I missed your question till today. I think Grandma lost it in a healthy way--she simply shrunk with age, and mainly because she lost her taste for sweets since she couldn't taste things as well. Mom has lost maybe 40 lbs since July and I think it's been in a very unhealthy way--she has simply quit eating and is behaving just like an anorexic teenager and because of that she's lost a lot of muscle. I've noticed that when she's hungry she's much fuzzier.
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Old 12-06-2011, 10:55 PM
Status: "Globalist's empire has obviously failed." (set 19 hours ago)
 
Location: Brawndo-Thirst-Mutilator-Nation
19,719 posts, read 20,360,682 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lovesMountains View Post
Fascinating! Thanks for posting

Some are now terming this as Type 3 diabetes. When your body can no longer metabolise significant amounts of carbs properly.....it wrecks your body in so many ways.
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Old 12-06-2011, 11:02 PM
Status: "Globalist's empire has obviously failed." (set 19 hours ago)
 
Location: Brawndo-Thirst-Mutilator-Nation
19,719 posts, read 20,360,682 times
Reputation: 16930
Quote:
Originally Posted by stepka View Post
Ah I'd love to read the whole thing but won't part with the 3.99 just now. Still I've been doing a lot of reading on this lately as things have changed drastically for the worse with mother. My theory is that even though she went off sweets, she's been insulin resistant for years b/c her diet has been primarily carb based and she has not cooked for years--hates it in fact--so it's been a lot of processed type foods. The healthiest food she eats is restaurant food and what I cook for her. I took her out for breakfast yesterday and all she would eat was one pancake, even though she got a plate with eggs, bacon, and sausage as well.

I know that one of the theories of why insulin is so damaging to the brain is because an excess causes inflammation and those with higher inflammation ratings from such tests as CRP or trig/HDL ratio have a greater chance of developing most major diseases of modern America--diabetes, heart disease, cancer, and yes, alzheimer's.

Here's the thing too--I don't know that diabetics are at so much greater risk than someone with insulin resistance, which can go on for years and years before diabetes becomes apparent. By then much of the damage is done. And some people will take their diabetic condition quite seriously and lose weight and have better insulin/glucose control than they had before they became diabetic.

So, I have come to the conclusion that the best way to avoid this fate worse than death is to keep the triglyceride and insulin levels as low as possible and that means limiting simple carbs. Exercise of course. Including anti-inflammatory foods such as turmeric and making sure you get all your vitamins. There's more of course, but research is suggesting that this is the best way. I guess what I mean is living your life as if you were scared to death of developing diabetes, b/c in truth, you should be. Gotta tell you--this is hard for me b/c I have such a sweet tooth it's awful but getting more protein in the diet is helping.

Oh, and Tickyul, I missed your question till today. I think Grandma lost it in a healthy way--she simply shrunk with age, and mainly because she lost her taste for sweets since she couldn't taste things as well. Mom has lost maybe 40 lbs since July and I think it's been in a very unhealthy way--she has simply quit eating and is behaving just like an anorexic teenager and because of that she's lost a lot of muscle. I've noticed that when she's hungry she's much fuzzier.

Very interesting Stepka.

I think that once you can no longer metabolise significant levels of carbs, you are best to switch to a low carb diet.

Even if your blood sugar levels are normal...........you may be pumping out a ton of insulin to keep the BS levels that way. Also, from what I have read, high insulin levels can actually damage insulin receptors......they will also recede in an attempt to protect themselves from toxic levels of insulin.
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