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Old 05-08-2013, 05:18 PM
 
43,012 posts, read 97,137,337 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post
I think Dr. Oz's show's targetted demographic will benefit. The majority of his "loyal" viewers are going to be the ignorant masses, trailer trash, and other people of limited brain capacity, who don't know any better than to believe anything Dr. Oz says. Since these are the type of people who would normally consider Swanson's Mac&Cheese to be a food group - I'd say he did them a service.

Anyone else, wouldn't believe the tripe that comes out of his mouth anyway, so it's a wash with them.
Exactly. I'm being more politically correct then you, but I'm basically saying it's a wash. Since 84% of Americans earn under 75k, he's doing a service to a majority of the population. I live in an affluent area, and you'd be amazed how many educated, privileged parents feed their kids Kraft Mac & Cheese. My son had a friend visit in grade school. I asked him what he liked to eat, and I was very excited when he said Mac & Cheese. I love it but rarely make it because my husband hates it. I made homemade Mac & Cheese. Trust me, I make it good. When I served it, the child sat there and stared at it like it was from Mars.
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Old 05-08-2013, 05:57 PM
 
Location: In a house
13,253 posts, read 38,709,111 times
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I grew up on Kraft. I think most of America did - even the wealthier folks. I know my grandmother made it for my aunts, and they were fairly wealthy. I didn't even know that there was such a thing as *baked* macaroni and cheese, til I got to college. And even then I never ate it. If it didn't come out of a box, with powdered cheese, then it wasn't worth eating.

But my husband and I make under 75K and we are definitely not the people Dr. Oz's show is marketed for. But then, our middle class neighborhood is less expensive than some other middle class neighborhoods in Connecticut. More than others - but definitely less than some
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Old 05-08-2013, 07:28 PM
 
43,012 posts, read 97,137,337 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post
I grew up on Kraft. I think most of America did - even the wealthier folks. I know my grandmother made it for my aunts, and they were fairly wealthy. I didn't even know that there was such a thing as *baked* macaroni and cheese, til I got to college. And even then I never ate it. If it didn't come out of a box, with powdered cheese, then it wasn't worth eating.
Nobody was feeding their kids Kraft in my childhood neighborhood. I didn't even know what it was until I was in my early 30s and other parents were feeding it to their kids. It can't be my age because the other parents are my age too. My parents never used anything processed. I remember the "San Francisco treat" theme song for the Rice-a-Roni commercial, but I never had Rice-a-Roni until was about 20 and a boyfriend made it. I was in my early 20s before I had a bagel. I'm as organic-cook-from-scratch as a person can be. That's all I've eaten my entire life. Everything else seems foreign to me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post
But my husband and I make under 75K and we are definitely not the people Dr. Oz's show is marketed for. But then, our middle class neighborhood is less expensive than some other middle class neighborhoods in Connecticut. More than others - but definitely less than some.
There are always exceptions. You were Dr. Oz's target audience at some point in your life since you grew up on Kraft.
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Old 05-08-2013, 07:38 PM
 
Location: In a house
13,253 posts, read 38,709,111 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hopes View Post
Nobody was feeding their kids Kraft in my childhood neighborhood. I didn't even know what it was until I was in my early 30s and other parents were feeding it to their kids. It can't be my age because the other parents are my age too. My parents never used anything processed. I remember the "San Francisco treat" theme song for the Rice-a-Roni commercial, but I never had Rice-a-Roni until was about 20 and a boyfriend made it. I was in my early 20s before I had a bagel. I'm as organic-cook-from-scratch as a person can be. That's all I've eaten my entire life. Everything else seems foreign to me.


There are always exceptions. You were Dr. Oz's target audience at some point in your life since you grew up on Kraft.
Heh no we weren't. Mom knew the value of home-cooked food - we ate home-cooked most nights, and crock-pots hadn't been invented yet. HER mom lived in the days before electric freezers were common - most people had ice-boxes. There was no such thing as a TV dinner, in my grandmother's time before she became a grandmother. In fact, broadcast TV wasn't even available in most parts of the USA until my mom was born. It was just a treat for us to have Kraft. Sort of like having a candy bar, or a Good Humor ice cream on Fridays in the summertime. We had our own vegetable garden, ate plenty healthy. But boy I loved me my Kraft Mac & Cheese. Still do. I wasn't the exception to the rule either. Our entire neighborhood was like that, as were most of the kids I grew up with and went to school with. Pretty typical suburban town. Most of us knew what "real" food was - and ate it daily. But we still enjoyed our occasional treats. Mom never baked macaroni and cheese. The only time I'd ever had any at all, was when she'd make the Kraft.
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Old 05-10-2013, 04:07 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,661 posts, read 77,851,759 times
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No, she's wrong. From the nutrition standpoint, Dr. Oz is right, there is no nutritional difference. Toxic contaminants are a completely different thing, that has nothing to do with the nutrition value of a food. And that long list of effects of pesticides are of only marginal relevance, because a great majority of people eat normally processed foods all their lives without experiencing symptoms of a single one of the risks on that list.

Without pesticides and other chemicals, US food production would be so low, that many, if not most Americans would suffer from malnutrition and be unable to afford a decently nutritious diet. Which would result in many more deaths than the toll from the toxins you are all so scared of.
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