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Old 09-06-2013, 11:10 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,502 posts, read 49,435,765 times
Reputation: 47677

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Why parents are ignoring the importance of vaccines is beyond me. They are listening to non medical celebrities with no more qualifications than once having posed for Playboy.
DH took our rising 6th grader for her necessary shots and even she was given a whooping cough booster. Not sure why and if I had been there I certainly would have questioned it for a child so old. Can anybody shine some light on this?

Disturbing reemergence of whooping cough - Video on NBCNews.com
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Old 09-06-2013, 11:26 PM
 
15,087 posts, read 10,026,269 times
Reputation: 30983
Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
Why parents are ignoring the importance of vaccines is beyond me. They are listening to non medical celebrities with no more qualifications than once having posed for Playboy.
DH took our rising 6th grader for her necessary shots and even she was given a whooping cough booster. Not sure why and if I had been there I certainly would have questioned it for a child so old. Can anybody shine some light on this?

Disturbing reemergence of whooping cough - Video on NBCNews.com
With the recent outbreak of whooping cough I don't think I would question my children getting a booster. Better safe then sorry. I know a lot of these anti-vac people are blaming the current outbreak on adults not getting vaccinated. From what I've read the booster is needed for adults once they are 19. The whooping cough booster vaccine for adolescents and adults is called Tdap. Both protect against whooping cough, tetanus, and diphtheria. I've read that the tetanus booster is needed every 10 years, so it might have been the tetanus that they were getting, but since the vaccine also protects against whooping cough peditricians might also be mentioning it as an added bonus with the recent outbreaks. Babies are given a tetanus shot, so it seems about right that 5-6 grade is when they would need the booster.
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Old 09-06-2013, 11:45 PM
 
6,737 posts, read 9,267,718 times
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A couple of years ago, in the PNW, the recommendation for adults was one booster every 2 years (we have a lot of anti-vaxxers and a lot of whooping cough).

But I went in to get mine two weeks ago and was told that the recc has changed -- it's now once per lifetime. Maybe that's once after age 18, I did not think to ask.
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Old 09-06-2013, 11:54 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
4,009 posts, read 6,243,675 times
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Right after I had my son, I had to get the tdap vaccine again as they have found that it wears off after a period of time.

With regards to the whole vaccination debate, I'm choosing to get my child vaccinated on schedule. As my Doctor has said, there are risks associated with vaccinating and not vaccinating. However, the risks associated with not vaccinating is greater.
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Old 09-07-2013, 05:39 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,502 posts, read 49,435,765 times
Reputation: 47677
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sundaydrive00 View Post
With the recent outbreak of whooping cough I don't think I would question my children getting a booster. Better safe then sorry. I know a lot of these anti-vac people are blaming the current outbreak on adults not getting vaccinated. From what I've read the booster is needed for adults once they are 19. The whooping cough booster vaccine for adolescents and adults is called Tdap. Both protect against whooping cough, tetanus, and diphtheria. I've read that the tetanus booster is needed every 10 years, so it might have been the tetanus that they were getting, but since the vaccine also protects against whooping cough peditricians might also be mentioning it as an added bonus with the recent outbreaks. Babies are given a tetanus shot, so it seems about right that 5-6 grade is when they would need the booster.
Thanks. In that piece of the evening news, Dr. Nancy Snyderman only mentions whooping cough vax at a much younger age than 11 or 12.
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Old 09-07-2013, 08:03 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
90,377 posts, read 112,082,291 times
Reputation: 35920
Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
Why parents are ignoring the importance of vaccines is beyond me. They are listening to non medical celebrities with no more qualifications than once having posed for Playboy.
DH took our rising 6th grader for her necessary shots and even she was given a whooping cough booster. Not sure why and if I had been there I certainly would have questioned it for a child so old. Can anybody shine some light on this?

Disturbing reemergence of whooping cough - Video on NBCNews.com
The Tdap (Tetanus, diphtheria, acellular pertussis) vaccine has been out for 8 years now. It is for people 10 yr old +. The rec has always been once per lifetime, except for pregnant women where the new rec is once per pregnancy. The "two year" rule that one poster remembers refers to the spacing between receipt of the other tetanus vaccine for older kids and adults, Td, and Tdap. However, that is no longer the recommendation. Anyone who hasn't had a Tdap is recommended to get it, ASAP.

Quote:
Originally Posted by glamatomic View Post
Right after I had my son, I had to get the tdap vaccine again as they have found that it wears off after a period of time.

With regards to the whole vaccination debate, I'm choosing to get my child vaccinated on schedule. As my Doctor has said, there are risks associated with vaccinating and not vaccinating. However, the risks associated with not vaccinating is greater.
"They" have known for a long time that the vaccine wears off in time. It just took a while to get a vaccine for older kids and adults. The vaccine for kids < 7 yrs is DTaP (Diptheria, Tetanus, acellular Pertussis). The capitalization refers to a full dose of these vaccines. Tdap has less diptheria toxoid and pertussis vaccines, the same amt. of tetanus. A full dose of diptheria toxoid can cause reactions in adults.

Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
Thanks. In that piece of the evening news, Dr. Nancy Snyderman only mentions whooping cough vax at a much younger age than 11 or 12.
Nancy needs to get with the program. Tdap has been around since 2005.
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Old 09-07-2013, 10:32 PM
 
Location: home state of Myrtle Beach!
6,587 posts, read 20,944,556 times
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Who's paying for it? That's the biggest obstacle!
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Old 09-07-2013, 10:48 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
33,514 posts, read 35,521,157 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by myrc60 View Post
Who's paying for it? That's the biggest obstacle!
The vaccine without insurance is probably about $65. If you have insurance, it will usually be covered. Copays vary with the plan.
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Old 09-07-2013, 10:51 PM
 
Location: In a house
13,251 posts, read 40,366,370 times
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How is the TDaP different from what we knew as the DPT growing up? This was back in the 1960's - I, and everyone my age in my community, has the scar on their arm just a few inches from the armpit, or just a few inches lower than the shoulder on the outer upper arm. We all know we were vaccinated because we all have the same scar. It was a pretty serious vaccination - a series of needles all in one big injection, and it left a circular scar around the size of a nickel (which spread into a quarter once we became adults).

None of us, so far as I'm aware, have ever come down with diptheria or pertussis, although most of us have had to get a tetanus booster at least once in our lives. We were taught that you get a booster if you are cut or injured by anything made out of metal, in particular - anything rusty - unless you have had a booster already within the past couple of years.

I've had a tetanus booster twice in my life. Once when I stepped on a nail on the sandbox in our back yard when I was maybe 8 years old. And the other when I was going to college.

Are they making them differently now, or have the rules just changed since understanding of vaccines and medicine and health have evolved?
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Old 09-07-2013, 11:00 PM
 
Location: home state of Myrtle Beach!
6,587 posts, read 20,944,556 times
Reputation: 3889
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
The vaccine without insurance is probably about $65. If you have insurance, it will usually be covered. Copays vary with the plan.
Well, for some that's a decision. Food or vaccinations?

Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post
How is the TDaP different from what we knew as the DPT growing up? This was back in the 1960's - I, and everyone my age in my community, has the scar on their arm just a few inches from the armpit, or just a few inches lower than the shoulder on the outer upper arm. We all know we were vaccinated because we all have the same scar. It was a pretty serious vaccination - a series of needles all in one big injection, and it left a circular scar around the size of a nickel (which spread into a quarter once we became adults).

None of us, so far as I'm aware, have ever come down with diptheria or pertussis, although most of us have had to get a tetanus booster at least once in our lives. We were taught that you get a booster if you are cut or injured by anything made out of metal, in particular - anything rusty - unless you have had a booster already within the past couple of years.

I've had a tetanus booster twice in my life. Once when I stepped on a nail on the sandbox in our back yard when I was maybe 8 years old. And the other when I was going to college.

Are they making them differently now, or have the rules just changed since understanding of vaccines and medicine and health have evolved?
I believe the shot we all got in the shoulder was for MMR but since I was like 5 years old at the time I could be wrong. I remember it hurt!
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