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Old 01-04-2008, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Fort Mill, SC (Charlotte 'burb)
4,730 posts, read 18,008,266 times
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My fiance just had this for a few days but we thought it might be due to the Coumadin she takes. Now I am experiencing it today.
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Old 01-04-2008, 09:27 AM
 
15 posts, read 69,941 times
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Default Vertigo...

I had a vertigo and had a LOT of tests to find out what it was. Ended up at the ear doctor who told me my inner ear was unusually susceptible to the cold, and to turn off my ceiling fan in the winter. Never have had the vertigo return, and that has been over 12 years ago. If I'm out somewhere that is cold and windy, I must cover my ears or the same thing will happen.
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Old 01-04-2008, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Oz
2,238 posts, read 9,050,042 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jessaka View Post
A cup of ginger tea is supposed to lessen the symptoms of veritigo. Also Gingko Biloba is suppose to restore balance as well. My book says to take 102 mg. every day in order to keep symptoms under control. If you try it let me know if it works.
It does not. The reason this vertigo happens is that the otoliths inside the inner ear become detached and start bouncing around in there with movement. This sends all sorts of mixed signals to your brain. Not only will you not be able to keep the ginger tea down, but it doesn't work anyway. The vertigo will not subside until the otoliths reattach themselves, and the only way that is going to happen is to abate movement for long enough that they can do so, OR have therapy to work the loose otoliths far enough back into the inner ear that they cannot bounce around anymore.

The meclizine (Bonine OTC) helps with the nausea and takes the edge off the vertigo, but it will not make it go away completely. The only thing that can be done is a) avoid movement, and b) canalith repositioning therapy.
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Old 01-04-2008, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Fort Mill, SC (Charlotte 'burb)
4,730 posts, read 18,008,266 times
Reputation: 1014
Emetrol is good for nausea. It is basically the same thing as the old soda syrup. It's somewhat expensive, but store brands are available.
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Old 01-05-2008, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Looking East and hoping!
28,227 posts, read 19,963,160 times
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SouthwardBound-From what I understand the therapy involves sitting on edge of bed and lowering yourself to one side then sit up and repeat on other side-his episodes vary but happen whenever he bends his head down. He has adjusted so when he has to bend he keeps his head "up." His episodes last anywhere from a day to day and a half-mostly it's the dizzyness after effects like not feeling steady.

Late Nov. he was snowblowing and when he came in the garage he bent for something and fell. Sofar nothing as severe as that again.

We are setting up with our doctor shortly. Thinking of you and hope we can conquer this.
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Old 01-10-2008, 07:05 PM
 
Location: a nation with hope
13,153 posts, read 17,857,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LaceyEx View Post
SouthwardBound-From what I understand the therapy involves sitting on edge of bed and lowering yourself to one side then sit up and repeat on other side-his episodes vary but happen whenever he bends his head down. He has adjusted so when he has to bend he keeps his head "up." His episodes last anywhere from a day to day and a half-mostly it's the dizzyness after effects like not feeling steady.

Late Nov. he was snowblowing and when he came in the garage he bent for something and fell. Sofar nothing as severe as that again.

We are setting up with our doctor shortly. Thinking of you and hope we can conquer this.
Thank you, LaceyEx. If I have another recurrence, I'll try the therapy technique. I've discovered the trick of keeping the head up when bending down. Haven't been taking any medication, and the vertigo seems to be pretty much gone, unless I get up suddenly, or move quickly and then I get a twinge of it but it doesn't last.

Someone mentioned Meclezine as being the same as Bonine OTC. Are they the same, or am I misunderstanding?

Lacey, hope all goes well and the he's feeling fine real soon! Let us know.
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Old 01-10-2008, 09:27 PM
 
Location: Oz
2,238 posts, read 9,050,042 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southward bound View Post
Thank you, LaceyEx. If I have another recurrence, I'll try the therapy technique. I've discovered the trick of keeping the head up when bending down. Haven't been taking any medication, and the vertigo seems to be pretty much gone, unless I get up suddenly, or move quickly and then I get a twinge of it but it doesn't last.

Someone mentioned Meclezine as being the same as Bonine OTC. Are they the same, or am I misunderstanding?

Lacey, hope all goes well and the he's feeling fine real soon! Let us know.
Yes, Bonine is meclizine. Each tablet is 25mg as I recall. When I have an attack I usually have to take two tablets to start, and then just keep taking one tablet every several hours to keep the edge off. Generally I only have to take the Bonine for a day, and by the next day even though the symptoms aren't gone they have abated enough to function relatively normal as long as I'm careful.

I do have to be very careful of doing anything like looking up or looking down to the floor, because when I do that I will end up immediately ON the floor which could be dangerous depending on what I'm doing or where I am. Fortunately, I only have about one or two episodes per year, but since I've been affected for about 12 years now, I've gotten very good at knowing how to deal with it.
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Old 01-14-2008, 07:00 PM
 
3,763 posts, read 10,994,397 times
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The first time this occurred to me I was about 32 years old. Woke up, felt fine, rolled over and the room started spinning. Got out of bed and staggered like a drunk. After 2 days, went to see the doctor. Yep, positional vertigo of unknown origin. First "attack" lasted about a month. Then it just went away. WHAT A relief. I learned to deal with it pretty quickly, turning head slowly, reaching for things keeping head upright, sleeping in one position. But I was so happy it went away.

then about 14 months later - came back for maybe a week.

The Dr I went to (general practitioner) said its the sort of thing that if you get it once, you are more susceptible to reocurrences than someone who's never had it is of getting it even once. great.

Since then, its just been a morning or two a year... Not even a whole day or so. And never has it been as bad as that first episode.

I have tried to do the "rapidly throwing yourself from one side to the other" exercises, but have no idea if that's why it was better the second/third/fourth times. Basically I've just gotten used to dealing with it.
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Old 01-15-2008, 05:02 AM
 
5,006 posts, read 14,129,423 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RoaminRed View Post
It does not. The reason this vertigo happens is that the otoliths inside the inner ear become detached and start bouncing around in there with movement. This sends all sorts of mixed signals to your brain. Not only will you not be able to keep the ginger tea down, but it doesn't work anyway. The vertigo will not subside until the otoliths reattach themselves, and the only way that is going to happen is to abate movement for long enough that they can do so, OR have therapy to work the loose otoliths far enough back into the inner ear that they cannot bounce around anymore.

The meclizine (Bonine OTC) helps with the nausea and takes the edge off the vertigo, but it will not make it go away completely. The only thing that can be done is a) avoid movement, and b) canalith repositioning therapy.
Ginger must have worked in some cases or it wouldn't be listed, but I understand what you are saying. Perhaps what it was is that people that had vertigo made ginger a daily drink in their lifes and not when they were in the midst of the problem. But I also don't believe that every herb, etc. works the same for every person, just as drugs affect people differently.
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Old 01-15-2008, 01:58 PM
 
54 posts, read 315,169 times
Reputation: 26
positional vertigo
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