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Old 10-27-2018, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Southern California
28,008 posts, read 10,514,981 times
Reputation: 17858

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luckyd609 View Post
So you had a crappy doctor and then you had a doctor that got lucky.
No, I had about 5 crappy doctors for about 10 yrs and then "got lucky" with an old time thinking doctor who knew what to do...he treated patients for years long before labs ever came into the picture. There were doctors before the modern medicine explosion as I've said before. He worked into his 90's...PT, but his patients loved him and didn't want him to ever leave.

I don't like to paint doctors as "crappy" but many just are stuck in what they are taught in medical schools today. Numbers. And why one endo just went with me drinking a glass of water and he said your thyroid is fine....

I believe MOST doctors are victims of medical school teachings today. Some doctors go on to advanced schooling and learn other ways to help their patients.

Last edited by jaminhealth; 10-27-2018 at 12:10 PM..
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Old 10-27-2018, 11:35 AM
 
1,719 posts, read 1,139,938 times
Reputation: 2630
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarnivalGal View Post
Perhaps the OP's thyroid is not the issue. But until a doctor actually runs a FULL thyroid panel, she won't know. To say it's not her thyroid based on a bare minimum number of tests without doing more thorough testing is irresponsible, IMO.

What would a Full thyroid panel include?
If I decide to get a second opinion, I want to be informed.

Right now, I'm fixing my HRT and continuing with my Vit D meds.
Both have been ordered.

I really feel this high inflammation may play a part too.

Thx..
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Old 10-27-2018, 02:26 PM
 
1,719 posts, read 1,139,938 times
Reputation: 2630
I can look this up myself ^^^^.
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Old 10-27-2018, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
26,746 posts, read 30,951,427 times
Reputation: 33363
Quote:
Originally Posted by fresnochili View Post
I was in an minor accident in April. I have arthritis, and the injury really jacked up my inflammation numbers.
And I feel like my energy is just buried inside.
The injury and the arthritis flare (what type of arthritis, if you do not mind sharing?) could account for the fatigue. Also, hair loss sometimes follows a medical illness or event. It's called telogen effluvium.

https://www.dermnetnz.org/topics/telogen-effluvium/

The good thing about telogen effluvium is that it is reversible.
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Old 10-27-2018, 05:01 PM
 
Location: Wine Country
5,734 posts, read 7,067,109 times
Reputation: 10968
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
No, I had about 5 crappy doctors for about 10 yrs and then "got lucky" with an old time thinking doctor who knew what to do...he treated patients for years long before labs ever came into the picture. There were doctors before the modern medicine explosion as I've said before. He worked into his 90's...PT, but his patients loved him and didn't want him to ever leave.

I don't like to paint doctors as "crappy" but many just are stuck in what they are taught in medical schools today. Numbers. And why one endo just went with me drinking a glass of water and he said your thyroid is fine....

I believe MOST doctors are victims of medical school teachings today. Some doctors go on to advanced schooling and learn other ways to help their patients.
Yes, they are victims . You have a narrow view of what you think is correct.
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Old 10-27-2018, 05:10 PM
 
Location: Southern California
28,008 posts, read 10,514,981 times
Reputation: 17858
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luckyd609 View Post
Yes, they are victims . You have a narrow view of what you think is correct.
I don't think it's narrow, it's quite broad as I've done plenty of research before labs ever came into the picture...have you? No one else here even seems to know about the principles of Dr. Barnes for an example on the thyroid history. And if they do, sure don't comment.

Could be I'm the only one around here who got thyroid support and no labs. If anyone else has they sure have not mentioned their success.
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Old 10-27-2018, 06:38 PM
 
Location: Surfside Beach, SC
2,386 posts, read 2,950,032 times
Reputation: 4951
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
Some of us use scientific evidence to inform our "guesses", though.

A set of normal thyroid studies is a pretty good reason to "guess" that the thyroid is normal.
Yes, for sure! I totally agree with you. Also, a few things that I haven't seen mentioned very much, if at all, in this thread:

Lexapro made the OP feel wonderful. She stopped taking it and is now focused on her thyroid, etc. Not sure why she stopped taking Lexapro, since she felt so good while she was taking it. OP - would you care to address this?

Also yes, her T3 is on the low side of normal, but so is her TSH. If the TSH was near borderline high and her T3 was borderline low, then I could understand that maybe she would need to be on medicine for it. As it is, her TSH is perfectly normal and there's no reason to think (guess - LOL) that her issues are due to her thyroid. For those interested in a more in-depth study of the subject, the Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine has featured a series of articles recently regarding the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid disease. The bottom line is that despite the number of other tests that are available, the TSH level remains the gold standard for the ongoing treatment of thyroid disease and should serve as the ultimate guide to thyroid medication dosage adjustments.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
Oh I forgot that great science has all the answers, that's why I went for 10 yrs and NEVER got help and then once on Armour depression lifted. Yeah./... The doctor back then who helped me finally used the Symptoms science.
Where did anyone say that "great science has all the answers?" Also, what is "Symptoms science?" I have never heard of that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
I, for one, would be interested in seeing what the OP finds out.
So would I. Just because someone said, "OP is mistaken in title of thread" doesn't mean that the thread should be closed. It's still an interesting discussion. And I want to find out what ends up happening with the OP, too -and I hope it's all good with a great outcome.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
I don't think it's narrow, it's quite broad as I've done plenty of research before labs ever came into the picture...have you? No one else here even seems to know about the principles of Dr. Barnes for an example on the thyroid history. And if they do, sure don't comment.

Could be I'm the only one around here who got thyroid support and no labs. If anyone else has they sure have not mentioned their success.
A lot of us have done plenty of research about things both before and after lab work became available. A lot of us have been studying and learning about all of this for a very long time. Also, a lot of people are vary familiar with Dr. Barnes and what he has to say about thyroid issues. There are many studies and endocrinologists that we know about and don't necessarily mention in our posts.

Yes, you very well might be the "only one around here who got thyroid support and no labs." I certainly hope so! I would hate to think that there are other health care providers that base their treatment on a guess, when there are more advanced ways to make a diagnosis and determine a course of action.

And did you ever consider that if someone else did this - "got thyriod support and no labs" maybe they "sure have not mentioned their success" because they didn't have a successful outcome?
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Old 10-27-2018, 06:42 PM
 
Location: Southern California
28,008 posts, read 10,514,981 times
Reputation: 17858
Lepapro is just another bandaid since the root cause isn't being found.

I was given 4 or so similar A/D's in the ten years and all the time my "gut" was telling me it is thyroid and sure enough it was. Not an A/D drug since 2002. Whoever thinks our bodies are anti depressant drug deficient better think on that one.

Last edited by jaminhealth; 10-27-2018 at 06:54 PM..
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Old 10-27-2018, 06:59 PM
 
7 posts, read 6,840 times
Reputation: 47
I am an "old time physician" with new ideas, because I keep up with the latest advances in medicine. My grandfather and my father were both family physicians, so I have been able to witness the progress of medicine throughout my life. I received my medical degree fifty years ago. When I began my medical education there were no ultrasounds, c-t scans, mri's, or PET scans, and nuclear studies were just starting to be developed. I did a cardiology fellowship at a time when cardiac catheterizations were dangerous, and there were no angioplasties or coronary bypass procedures. A person with end-stage kidney disease had to be selected for dialysis because that treatment wasn't generally available to everyone who needed it due to a lack of dialysis facilities. Most of the drugs we now use didn't even exist when I began my career in medicine. Personally, I think taking a careful and thorough history is still the most important way to diagnose my patients, but I also rely on lab and imaging tests to confirm my suspicions, so I don't have to 'guess' at what I do.

Just so you know, I consistently have been selected as a top doctor by numerous publications, including New York Magazine, New Jersey Monthly, Town and Country Magazine, and Castle Connally's Guide to Top Doctor's in the New York Area, and in the United States. I have been a faculty member at three universities, and have been board certified and re-certified in my specialty six times. I am currently rated as the top internist in my town and one of the top ten internists in my state by Rate M.D's. These awards have been based upon ratings both by my colleagues and by my patients. I continue to practice medicine because I feel I have a depth of knowledge and experience that only time and continuing education can give, and because my patients and colleagues beg me not to retire. I don't say any of this to boast, but only so you'll know that I know what I am talking about. Unfortunately, there are irresponsible physicians who put patients through elaborate and expensive tests and risky treatments based upon superficial or even incorrect information. If I don't have a complete understanding of a patient's condition, I will happily refer them to someone with greater knowledge than my own.

After diabetes, thyroid disease is the most common ailment endocrinologists treat. I'm glad we have endocrinologists, because even after all my years in practice, I find that thyroid disease can be very complex, sometimes requiring the in-depth knowledge of a specialist. Some of these posts show a fairly deep knowledge about thyroid disease, while others do not. I can tell you that diagnostic tests are very helpful in figuring out what is going on with the thyroid, and I wouldn't dare to treat a patient for a thyroid disorder without them. There are many people, including physicians, who possess only a superficial knowledge of the complexities of thyroid disease and therefore advise and treat patients incorrectly. Sometimes even endocrinologists have difficulty figuring out what is going on with a particular patient. I would caution anyone against accepting specific treatment advice from anyone who is not a physician who has taken a careful history, performed an in-depth physical examination, and ordered appropriate diagnostic testing. A wrong diagnosis and/or treatment regimen could have disastrous results, including serious cardiovascular and neurological problems, and even death. Anecdotal experiences are the least reliable sources of evidence, and I would certainly not take specific medical advice from a lay person posting an opinion on the internet, especially someone who doesn't have an in-depth knowledge of the particular patient at issue. Also I would admonish anyone experiencing chronic fatigue to investigate other reasons for such fatigue. While thyroid disease might be the cause, there are other potentially serious illness that should be investigated, some of which could be serious or even life-threatening if not diagnosed and treated appropriately.
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Old 10-27-2018, 08:20 PM
 
Location: Central IL
16,985 posts, read 10,146,417 times
Reputation: 40212
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
Lepapro is just another bandaid since the root cause isn't being found.

I was given 4 or so similar A/D's in the ten years and all the time my "gut" was telling me it is thyroid and sure enough it was. Not an A/D drug since 2002. Whoever thinks our bodies are anti depressant drug deficient better think on that one. .
Ya know...I've said this a few times in different threads but I'll do it again. My dad was bipolar and after a suicide attempt he even got ECT treatments before finally getting on some medication that worked for him...he had two twin sisters who were bipolar. He had a brother who apparently shot himself. He had a nephew who killed himself. My mom suffered from major depression and supposedly attempted to overdose at one point. Her father killed himself.

So.....I was depressed and suicidal (but no attempts) through high school. And mostly through college....I finally figured out after a lot of therapy that really did nothing for me that I had MAJOR family history of mood disorders on BOTH sides of my family...and maybe, just maybe I should see a psychiatrist. Depression is not always situational and due to some event in your life. Many times, if it doesn't pass after a few months it is because of a physiological/biochemical issue. Especially if you have long-term depression in your family.

I tried several antidepressants before I found one that worked for me. I'll never be a happy go lucky person but I'm doing a LOT better. And after all the thinking I've done on this topic - you're damned sure that I KNOW I need antidepressants and no one's gonna pry them out of my hands. Just be sure you're only speaking for yourself because your views on depression sure don't apply to me - and they don't for a lot of people - people who might not be alive without antidepressants.
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