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Old 10-27-2018, 10:45 PM
 
Location: Southern California
28,008 posts, read 10,514,981 times
Reputation: 17853

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Quote:
Originally Posted by reneeh63 View Post
Ya know...I've said this a few times in different threads but I'll do it again. My dad was bipolar and after a suicide attempt he even got ECT treatments before finally getting on some medication that worked for him...he had two twin sisters who were bipolar. He had a brother who apparently shot himself. He had a nephew who killed himself. My mom suffered from major depression and supposedly attempted to overdose at one point. Her father killed himself.

So.....I was depressed and suicidal (but no attempts) through high school. And mostly through college....I finally figured out after a lot of therapy that really did nothing for me that I had MAJOR family history of mood disorders on BOTH sides of my family...and maybe, just maybe I should see a psychiatrist. Depression is not always situational and due to some event in your life. Many times, if it doesn't pass after a few months it is because of a physiological/biochemical issue. Especially if you have long-term depression in your family.

I tried several antidepressants before I found one that worked for me. I'll never be a happy go lucky person but I'm doing a LOT better. And after all the thinking I've done on this topic - you're damned sure that I KNOW I need antidepressants and no one's gonna pry them out of my hands. Just be sure you're only speaking for yourself because your views on depression sure don't apply to me - and they don't for a lot of people - people who might not be alive without antidepressants.
I don't have the issues you speak of in my family but I suppose they are out there in the population.

I speak only of my 10 yrs of going with clinical depression and NOT getting thyroid help and then finally from my great ole back doctor who knew more than just caring for the back issues.

And I still believe many are not getting their thyroid supported properly and are given A/D's for the ongoing depression despite on a thyroid med, or no thyroid med when they come up with so many HypoT symptoms.
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Old 10-28-2018, 07:21 AM
 
1,180 posts, read 747,991 times
Reputation: 2582
Quote:
Originally Posted by fresnochili View Post
I've been feeling really fatigued lately. Never really understood the meaning of fatigue till now.
My hair is also falling out in the shower so much, I tack it on the shower wall.

So here are my latest #s for on my bloodwork.

Thyroxine, Free, Direct...1.2...range 0.8-1.8 ng/dL
TSH (High Sensitivity)....0.80..""""" 0.40-4.50 mIU/L
T3, Free.......................2.4..."""""""2.3-4.2 pg/mL

I went to my PCP and she is only able to prescribe Levothyroxine, so she sent me to an endocrinologist who told me there was nothing wrong...my #s were normal, and there are lots of reasons to be tired.
I didn't listen to much more, just told her I didn't agree with her and left.

Is my T3 low or not? Sure looks like it to me.
My PCP thought the endo might prescribe cytomel.

I really hope my thyroid is ok. I'm thinking I may be low on my Vit D. I haven't taken it in abt 6 mos.

P.S. The endo did say since my TSH was normal that my T3 was fine...
Haven't read the whole thread, but as others have said your T3 is at the low end of normal. Now, IF you still suspect something isn't right then please get a second, third, or fourth opinion. Whatever it takes. I had not even turned 40 yet when I "crashed." Everything about me just seemed to go bad all at once.. energy, metabolism, libido, you name it.

But doctor after doctor told me that my "blood work was normal." I finally had to go to one of those independent places that aren't tied to any insurance company. It wasn't cheap, but they ran the gamut of tests - including saliva samples, and the results were staggering. My T4 and T3 were both low, I had adrenal deficiency, and low testosterone.

That was ten years ago, and it took a little time to get things adjusted, but I'm balanced out now and am much healthier and feel better now at 51 than I did when I was 40. Like I said, the key is finding a doctor that will listen. Good luck!
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Old 10-28-2018, 10:44 AM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
4,040 posts, read 1,579,293 times
Reputation: 9381
Quote:
Originally Posted by akueljuan View Post
I have been a faculty member at three universities.... I am currently rated ... one of the top ten internists in my state …. .

Three universities??… -so you can't hold a job, eh?


Top 10, but not #1 ?....How many "Patients Behind" are you out of first place?





Good post.
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Old 10-28-2018, 12:59 PM
 
Location: on the wind
10,875 posts, read 4,915,509 times
Reputation: 35965
I don't think it's narrow, it's quite broad as I've done plenty of research before labs ever came into the picture.

If you did your research and formed opinions based on that research you are seriously behind the times (in other words, outdated; superseded). Those horrible "labs" have been around for a very long time. You might find this article interesting. Well, maybe not you (its too current) but others might. Have to say I enjoyed it and learned quite a bit.

https://www.ascls-pa.org/uploads/2/4...diagandlab.pdf

Could be I'm the only one around here who got thyroid support and no labs. If anyone else has they sure have not mentioned their success.

Hmm, that just might be because there are few to none, or when they didn't get relief from their symptoms and kept searching for the cause they discovered that they were not thyroid-related in the first place. Then, as they did get that relief, they have no reason to continue to read thyroid discussions.

Last edited by Parnassia; 10-28-2018 at 01:14 PM..
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Old 10-28-2018, 01:03 PM
 
7 posts, read 6,840 times
Reputation: 47
LOL Guido. They don't rank the top ten in the state. They just say you're in the top ten.
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Old 10-28-2018, 04:30 PM
 
71 posts, read 29,970 times
Reputation: 394
Having all your numbers "in range" is not necessarily cause to conclude that thyroid function is optimal. There are many resources from doctors which back their belief that having high levels of Reverse T3 (but still within "range") and being on the low end of the range of T3 can indicate hypothyroidism and having elevated antibodies can be indicative of Hashimoto's Thyroiditis, a condition in which the immune system attacks the thyroid. Stop The Thyroid Madness (there are two books, a website, and a FB page) goes into detail on how commonly this goes undiagnosed and treated incorrectly. It's also possible to have adrenal issues and have many of the same symptoms. This requires a saliva test for cortisol levels at 4 key times of day. (A blood test shows only the level at the time blood is drawn, and the levels vary during the day. It's important to know if your levels are following the right pattern --highest at rising, lowest before bed, etc.) Gut health can also be a factor in causing the same issues, and can mean that food sensitivities are present. There are several diets that eliminate potential sources of inflammation and then reintroduce them so they can be identified if/when the body reacts to them.

Keep a log of what you eat and how you feel each day. Keep track of your sleep. If you can, eliminate gluten. Most autoimmune protocol diets call for elimination of dairy, nightshades, nuts, eggs, legumes, caffeine, sugar, and processed foods. Try to eat as clean as possible--organic meats and vegetables. Eat healthy fats like avocado and oils like grapeseed and coconut. See if it makes you feel better. (Search for AIP diet for specifics.)

Unfortunately, many doctors do not understand the thyroid and rely strictly on the results of the TSH blood test. TSH is a pituitary indicator and not an accurate reflection of thyroid health. Find a doctor who will do the proper testing and be able to interpret the results. The STTM website has a list of recommended tests, some of which you can order for yourself if you so desire. Most of all, find a doctor who listens to you, gives credence to your symptoms, and is committed to finding a solution, whether it's thyroid-related or otherwise. Sometimes a change in diet and the right supplements can help alleviate your symptoms rather than resorting to pharmaceuticals.

**I'm not a doctor, nor do I play one on TV. Also have no association with any thyroid, adrenal, or gut health associations or supplement manufacturers.**
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Old 10-28-2018, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Surfside Beach, SC
2,386 posts, read 2,950,032 times
Reputation: 4951
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Golden Rule View Post
Having all your numbers "in range" is not necessarily cause to conclude that thyroid function is optimal. There are many resources from doctors which back their belief that having high levels of Reverse T3 (but still within "range") and being on the low end of the range of T3 can indicate hypothyroidism and having elevated antibodies can be indicative of Hashimoto's Thyroiditis, a condition in which the immune system attacks the thyroid. Stop The Thyroid Madness (there are two books, a website, and a FB page) goes into detail on how commonly this goes undiagnosed and treated incorrectly. It's also possible to have adrenal issues and have many of the same symptoms. This requires a saliva test for cortisol levels at 4 key times of day. (A blood test shows only the level at the time blood is drawn, and the levels vary during the day. It's important to know if your levels are following the right pattern --highest at rising, lowest before bed, etc.) Gut health can also be a factor in causing the same issues, and can mean that food sensitivities are present. There are several diets that eliminate potential sources of inflammation and then reintroduce them so they can be identified if/when the body reacts to them.

Keep a log of what you eat and how you feel each day. Keep track of your sleep. If you can, eliminate gluten. Most autoimmune protocol diets call for elimination of dairy, nightshades, nuts, eggs, legumes, caffeine, sugar, and processed foods. Try to eat as clean as possible--organic meats and vegetables. Eat healthy fats like avocado and oils like grapeseed and coconut. See if it makes you feel better. (Search for AIP diet for specifics.)

Unfortunately, many doctors do not understand the thyroid and rely strictly on the results of the TSH blood test. TSH is a pituitary indicator and not an accurate reflection of thyroid health. Find a doctor who will do the proper testing and be able to interpret the results. The STTM website has a list of recommended tests, some of which you can order for yourself if you so desire. Most of all, find a doctor who listens to you, gives credence to your symptoms, and is committed to finding a solution, whether it's thyroid-related or otherwise. Sometimes a change in diet and the right supplements can help alleviate your symptoms rather than resorting to pharmaceuticals.

**I'm not a doctor, nor do I play one on TV. Also have no association with any thyroid, adrenal, or gut health associations or supplement manufacturers.**




I guess you didn't bother to read most of the previous posts or you would have seen this, among many other posts from people who actually DO know what they are talking about.

For those interested in a more in-depth study of the subject, the Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine has featured a series of articles recently regarding the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid disease. The bottom line is that despite the number of other tests that are available, the TSH level remains the gold standard for the ongoing treatment of thyroid disease and should serve as the ultimate guide to thyroid medication dosage adjustments.

As for the second part of what you said that I bolded, then why are you giving medical advice to the OP? You didn't really need to add that disclaimer - it was obvious that you don't know what you're talking about.
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Old 10-28-2018, 05:51 PM
 
Location: Surfside Beach, SC
2,386 posts, read 2,950,032 times
Reputation: 4951
OP - Since you felt great while you were taking Lexapro, why did you stop taking it?
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Old 10-28-2018, 08:17 PM
 
71 posts, read 29,970 times
Reputation: 394
Quote:
Originally Posted by vrexy View Post
[/b]


I guess you didn't bother to read most of the previous posts or you would have seen this, among many other posts from people who actually DO know what they are talking about.

For those interested in a more in-depth study of the subject, the Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine has featured a series of articles recently regarding the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid disease. The bottom line is that despite the number of other tests that are available, the TSH level remains the gold standard for the ongoing treatment of thyroid disease and should serve as the ultimate guide to thyroid medication dosage adjustments.

As for the second part of what you said that I bolded, then why are you giving medical advice to the OP? You didn't really need to add that disclaimer - it was obvious that you don't know what you're talking about.
Lighten up, Francis. It was meant to be lighthearted. Besides, I said that the OP's ills could be due to any number of things. If you consider recommending a clean diet and getting some testing done "medical advice," then you're as bad as a lot of the doctors out there. Holy cow! Recommending a clean diet and tests! Sue me! I'm a danger to society!

Many doctors have found that TSH alone is not enough to adequately diagnose and treat the thyroid. It's why there are tens of thousands on one FB group alone who are desperate to find answers that the Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine apparently cannot answer.
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Old 10-29-2018, 05:11 AM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
4,040 posts, read 1,579,293 times
Reputation: 9381
Quote:
Originally Posted by akueljuan View Post
LOL Guido. They don't rank the top ten in the state. They just say you're in the top ten.


Thanks for taking the post in the spirit in which it was intended. I guess the little "smiley face" wasn't enough for some readers.


In regards this whole thread, it seems members are aligned into two camps-- those that insist that vague feelings of fatigue, lack of energy, etc absolutely MUST be due to some subtle thyroid problem, despite normal, routine thyroid function tests, and those who realize that those are vague, nonspecific complaints and that normal, routine TFTs mean they should be looking elsewhere for the root of the complaints.


Subtle thyroid abnormalities rarely show any signs or symptoms. To get actual positive physical findings, one usually has to be way out of the normal range on tests.


If the thyroid is starting to poop out, the pituitary senses that and increases the TSH- telling the thyroid to work harder, so T4 remains in the normal range (ie- no symptoms of low T4 because it ain't low) until it finally can't do the job any longer and only then does T4 fall. That may take years.
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