U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Health and Wellness
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-20-2019, 09:19 PM
 
9,446 posts, read 5,793,516 times
Reputation: 18861

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by TamaraSavannah View Post
My head.....and my heart. I am on an essentially drug free life and I don't want to start now, so it is to modify my diet. T'was referencing Dennis Weaver this morning, about the possibility of going that way. I don't think I can, I like beef and fish too much, but I think I will be cooking a lot more beans, peas, and lentils now. I am sure my brisket seasoning is loaded so now, when I cut it up for the freezer, it needs to be a very thin slice and then, one slice with many days in between.

I was shocked, after I got home yesterday, to find that the lemon pepper I love....is loaded with salt. So maybe I am going to look into whether or not I can make my own, without salt.

When baking calls for salt, be it bread or sweets, is there something else that can be used?

At one time, I bought the fresh tomatoes but then noticed the cans were cheaper, so I went that way......sigh.

My husband is also on a low sodium diet due to BP. He can use "no salt" though, which has potassium rather than sodium. Swiss cheese is low sodium as opposed to most cheese. You can find canned tomatoes, boullion, and many other no/low sodium products at most grocery stores or online.

Unfortunately regular bread is loaded with sodium, BUT you can find no sodium bread recipes online. My recipe uses egg white instead of sodium. I just reduce the liquid in the recipe by about 2T and add an egg white. Sometimes I just use the whole egg and reduce the liquid a little more. I use my bread machine.

GOOD LUCK!!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-21-2019, 02:39 AM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
18,597 posts, read 9,895,149 times
Reputation: 14810
Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
Sounds like you are going to tackle this on your own. Good for you. Yes, cut out as much sodium by staying away from canned anything for starters and yes, check those store bottled spices. I am sure many do not realize they have more salt than anything else. I have gotten to checking the labels You have got me to thinking more already about cutting the salt as much as possible and still enjoying my favorite foods.

Well, salt was one thing she said......alcohol was another. So far, so good on the latter but that's a tough one to beat when you have mainland European ancestry. Ie, a tradition of wine at most meals. But so far, so good, a small glass of wine and a big glass of water.


Back to salt and bread making.....what if you substituted garlic for salt? That's what I do when I am boiling the water for spaghetti, put garlic in the water instead of salt.



Probably not a workable idea for cooking sweets but.....when I was making avocado bread, I didn't have any all spice, so I used nutmeg instead and "created" avocado dessert bread.


Is there a sweet alternative to salt in baking sweets?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-21-2019, 08:56 AM
 
9,446 posts, read 5,793,516 times
Reputation: 18861
The thing about salt in bread is that it's not only for flavor, but mostly because it helps the bread rise. For some reason that I don't understand, egg white also helps it rise so that's why I use it. For flavor, you can add other spices either to the dough or to the bread after you slice it. It's fun to experiment with lots of different things.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-21-2019, 09:52 AM
 
35,585 posts, read 41,702,341 times
Reputation: 52184
Quote:
Originally Posted by TamaraSavannah View Post
They aren't too happy with my BP and one of the things they suggested was less salt.

Well, I am hardly one to use the shaker but looking at the food I eat, from bread to canned tomatoes (and more), it's loaded!

So aside from more careful shopping (I would think with my lack of processed foods diet I was safe) and perhaps baking my own French bread instead of buying it, what else can be done to suck out the salt before it goes over the lips? Open my tomatoes can, put them in with a potato before I put them in my salad?
Start doing a lot of cardio. Sweat it out!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-21-2019, 10:56 AM
 
9,377 posts, read 6,202,427 times
Reputation: 20456
Quote:
Originally Posted by TamaraSavannah View Post
(snip)
I was shocked, after I got home yesterday, to find that the lemon pepper I love....is loaded with salt. So maybe I am going to look into whether or not I can make my own, without salt.

(snip)
Yes, gotta watch those seasonings. I always look at the ingredients. If the first ingredient is salt, or if salt is listed before the the main ingredient I'm buying that for (like, lemon)...I don't buy it. Or I buy it and rarely use it...it's basically flavored salt.

I love Lemon Pepper, and the one I have in the cabinet now is mainly salt. But I rarely use it. I DID find a more expensive brand that had much less salt, but it was just too expensive, for how little I'd use it.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-21-2019, 02:45 PM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
18,597 posts, read 9,895,149 times
Reputation: 14810
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChessieMom View Post
Start doing a lot of cardio. Sweat it out!

In Texas, you don't need to do cardio.....sweat comes naturally down here.


But that said, since it does, I'm not sure if that is the way to go.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-21-2019, 02:52 PM
 
9,307 posts, read 5,345,818 times
Reputation: 10397
Since I don't go to doctors, I have no idea what my BP is. I will say this much. When I lived in SW Florida for 10 years, I craved salt. Didn't before moving there, and haven't since then.

Must have had something to do with all the heat and humidity. Maybe you should just trust what you body is telling you to do? I also hate red meat, but when I start craving steaks, I go with it.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-21-2019, 03:08 PM
 
Location: Somewhere.
10,444 posts, read 24,140,988 times
Reputation: 8965
I buy no salt added canned tomatoes, no salt added tomato sauce, generally everything no salt added or at least 140 mg or less per serving. I do add some salt to my food, but it's not aggressively shaking the salt on food, it's light little taps on the shaker instead.

You can squeeze limes or lemons or both on your food and it will give you a salty taste without any salt. You can dehydrate celery, grind it down into a powder, and it tastes salty. put that on your food. (You can actually buy that already ground down in health food stores, but pricey.) Also get used to the no salt added seasonings. Your taste buds will adjust in time. If you have to have the salt, just a light little tap onto the surface of your food will do the trick. Do not cook with salt. Avoid processed foods, that is where the salt lives. Plus, very important to drink a lot of water when using anything with salt. It helps flush excess sodium from your body. 6-8 cups a day is fine, a little more is OK too. Drink tea or herbal tea. Both act as a diuretic. Plus walk, it helps your blood pressure go down.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-21-2019, 03:58 PM
 
4,942 posts, read 2,871,462 times
Reputation: 10773
Quote:
Originally Posted by TamaraSavannah View Post
Well, salt was one thing she said......alcohol was another. So far, so good on the latter but that's a tough one to beat when you have mainland European ancestry. Ie, a tradition of wine at most meals. But so far, so good, a small glass of wine and a big glass of water.
YES! A big glass of water helps a lot! I take diabetes medication that is hard on the liver so I've cut way back on alcohol. The only drink that I ever order out for myself now is an occasional glass of red wine, and if I have it at home, I will pour a very small amount, along with that large glass of water. If I'm craving a mixed drink or beer, I'll have a few sips of hubby's drink and I'm fine.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-22-2019, 03:39 AM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
18,597 posts, read 9,895,149 times
Reputation: 14810
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gorges View Post
YES! A big glass of water helps a lot! I take diabetes medication that is hard on the liver so I've cut way back on alcohol. The only drink that I ever order out for myself now is an occasional glass of red wine, and if I have it at home, I will pour a very small amount, along with that large glass of water. If I'm craving a mixed drink or beer, I'll have a few sips of hubby's drink and I'm fine.
I went wine shopping yesterday and I hit a mother lode on my first of 3 planned stops.....so I didn't have to hit the other two. Four cases, two cooking, white, and two drinking, red, and at the current reduced consumption, the cooking ought to last me 71 meals and the drinking......144 days.

I opened one of the new Chardonnay's to taste what I got. Four ounces in me, it was decent, over prepping dinner, a cup into the spaghetti topping (two types of fish, oysters, bleu cheese, water, olives, spices). Topping poured over the spaghetti and croutons, Parmesan over the spaghetti, consumed with a 4 oz glass of an opened Cabernet.

Salt wise, some things were measured like the bleu cheese and oysters, somethings not like the croutons and Parmesan. After it was all consumed, I sat there, wanting another glass of the Cabernet, but in the minutes that passed, not doing anything, the thirst eventually went away and I didn't.

Finally, around here, in Texas, for me, over a gallon of chilled well water is consumed daily. It's the taste of the chilled water and probably habit as well, that keeping very hydrated is a measure against kidney stones.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Health and Wellness
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2022, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top