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Old 12-20-2019, 03:51 PM
 
58 posts, read 12,896 times
Reputation: 204

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Out of the tap, but I fill up a gallon jug before going to bed, put it in the fridge, and drink it the next day. That takes care of the slight chlorine smell it sometimes has. And it is cold.
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Old 12-20-2019, 04:28 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
20,967 posts, read 19,914,982 times
Reputation: 36244
My water has a bad taste but not much of a chlorine odor or taste. When I look online it's within the federal guidelines for contaminants but it's far from perfect. Where I used to live, I had a charcoal tank filter installed under the kitchen sink. But this is an apartment complex so I just use a Zero water pitcher and the water tastes pretty good and hopefully it's cleaner.

I can't stand the taste of water that's in a plastic bottle--all I can taste is the plastic. If I have to buy water (as a treat) I'll buy San Pellegrino in glass bottles.
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Old 12-20-2019, 06:54 PM
 
Location: plano
6,794 posts, read 8,438,599 times
Reputation: 6095
I drink tap water, 200 to 300 ounces a day. I prefer it cold from the refrig. I drink out of 32 ounce plastic glasses. Bottle water tastes blah to me. Our tap water is not considered good tasting but cold suits me fine. I love water prefer to any other drink by a huge margin.
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Old 12-20-2019, 07:48 PM
 
11,802 posts, read 8,953,170 times
Reputation: 21745
I buy distilled water by the gallon. That's pretty much all I drink.
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Old 12-20-2019, 07:51 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
11,310 posts, read 21,393,878 times
Reputation: 26965
I buy bottled spring water. My daughter gets hives from our tap water. She even has to brush her teeth with bottled water. We used to use the filtered water from the vending machine at the grocery store, but she can't tolerate it now.
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Old 12-21-2019, 02:15 AM
 
Location: Eugene, Oregon
9,845 posts, read 3,356,619 times
Reputation: 14769
The mid-sized town where I live, gets 90% of the water for its public utility from deep wells, which are scattered around the area. They range from about 250 feet to 400 feet in depth. A small, experimental, sand-filtration facility takes water from a river for the other 10%. This water requires only a small amount of chlorine as a disinfectant.

Our water bills are very low, compared to those of many other areas. My bill this past month was $2.02 for the water I used, plus $17.10 for the basic water charge. In the summer, when I water all my trees and plants twice a week, I may use five or six times that much. I'm lucky to be living in an area where there's never been a municipal water shortage.

There have been some troubles, such as the pollution that a large, timber-products plant spewed out on the community. It was forced to clean up the waste it was dumping into a river and the foul chemicals it released into the air. But there was a continuing problem of toxins that were allowed to sink into the ground. A plume of toxins, at the depth of the wells, slowly encroached on some of them and they had to be abandoned.

In many places in the world, there are unknown toxins threatening well water systems. This is a delayed action process, but eventually, industrial pollution will poison many more water supplies. Sometimes, the pollution may not reveal itself for decades after the source has gone out of business. Gold mines from the 1800s that put many tons of mercury into our watersheds, continue to render the resident fish unsafe to eat.
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Old 12-21-2019, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Central Illinois
486 posts, read 119,789 times
Reputation: 1234
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve McDonald View Post
The mid-sized town where I live, gets 90% of the water for its public utility from deep wells, which are scattered around the area. They range from about 250 feet to 400 feet in depth. A small, experimental, sand-filtration facility takes water from a river for the other 10%. This water requires only a small amount of chlorine as a disinfectant.

Our water bills are very low, compared to those of many other areas. My bill this past month was $2.02 for the water I used, plus $17.10 for the basic water charge. In the summer, when I water all my trees and plants twice a week, I may use five or six times that much. I'm lucky to be living in an area where there's never been a municipal water shortage.

There have been some troubles, such as the pollution that a large, timber-products plant spewed out on the community. It was forced to clean up the waste it was dumping into a river and the foul chemicals it released into the air. But there was a continuing problem of toxins that were allowed to sink into the ground. A plume of toxins, at the depth of the wells, slowly encroached on some of them and they had to be abandoned.

In many places in the world, there are unknown toxins threatening well water systems. This is a delayed action process, but eventually, industrial pollution will poison many more water supplies. Sometimes, the pollution may not reveal itself for decades after the source has gone out of business. Gold mines from the 1800s that put many tons of mercury into our watersheds, continue to render the resident fish unsafe to eat.
Water is so ultimately important to life itself, that it's hard to fathom why we continue to contaminate our precious clean water sources. I guess we can chalk that up to greed and ignorance. Historically, it was common practice to make your enemy's water supply, undrinkable. Unfortunately, we now do this to our own water sources.
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Old 12-21-2019, 08:31 AM
 
Location: northern New England
2,863 posts, read 1,299,395 times
Reputation: 11300
From the tap, village water system that supplies a few dozen households. Comes via gravity from a deep well on the hill, which gives great water pressure and works even when the power is out. Tastes great too.
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Old 12-21-2019, 08:53 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
38,393 posts, read 47,274,053 times
Reputation: 64860
Out of the tap with ice from the ice maker. There is a filter on the ice maker water. I’ve never lived anywhere, city water or well water, where I didn’t drink the tap water.
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Old 12-21-2019, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
38,393 posts, read 47,274,053 times
Reputation: 64860
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedgehog_Mom View Post
I buy bottled spring water. My daughter gets hives from our tap water. She even has to brush her teeth with bottled water. We used to use the filtered water from the vending machine at the grocery store, but she can't tolerate it now.
Seriously? What is in the water that affects her? That’s a shame.
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