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Old 01-02-2020, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Shawnee-on-Delaware, PA
4,137 posts, read 3,798,088 times
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OP, I think you're trying to compare apples to oranges.

I drive a car to work because my commute is 35 miles and there is no bus or rail route that I could take. (FWIW I used to ride my bicycle to work a lot when I only lived 1 mile away)

People who have a choice among car, subway, bus, or rail are going to live closer to large metro areas, but then you have to control for income differences among those people. A wealthy person will take a car and have access to better health care and better overall health options. Poor people will ride the bus or subway and have fewer options for health care and healthy lifestyle choices. Yes, yes, I know not everyone who takes the subway is poor and not everyone who drives a car is rich, but I'm talking in general.
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Old 01-02-2020, 02:40 PM
 
8,227 posts, read 3,008,313 times
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Based on nothing...my opinion is that it's probably apples and oranges.


On one hand, you don't have the stress of driving every day, but on the other hand you are exposing yourself to everyone's germs on a daily basis. (But heck, if you work in any kind of public way...you expose yourself to their germs anyway.)


And while you don't have the stress of driving...some people use their bus time or subway time, etc. to do work...so you're just exchanging one kind of stress for another. But other people use their bus time to read, or do cross stitch, or crossword puzzles...so, it seems to me, it's kind of a "whatever floats your boat" kind of thing.
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Old 01-02-2020, 03:52 PM
 
Location: Backwoods of Maine
7,227 posts, read 8,446,900 times
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Depends.

To use a bus, you pretty much have to live in the city. That can be stressful, with higher costs and dense population. Rural dwellers and suburbanites have to drive a car, but at home they have more open spaces and less crowding. I always found that less stressful.
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Old 01-02-2020, 04:57 PM
 
8,227 posts, read 3,008,313 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nor'Eastah View Post
Depends.

To use a bus, you pretty much have to live in the city. That can be stressful, with higher costs and dense population. Rural dwellers and suburbanites have to drive a car, but at home they have more open spaces and less crowding. I always found that less stressful.

Plus, riding a bus usually takes longer than actually driving, factoring in the wait time for the bus, and hoping it's running on schedule, and all the stops and starts.


I don't know...seems like it all evens out.
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Old 01-02-2020, 05:43 PM
 
Location: West Madison^WMHT
3,392 posts, read 3,347,386 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rah-ghr View Post
I was wondering if you notice any difference(physically, mentally, etc.)between bus riders and car drivers. I understand that heredity plays a big part, but I am curious to know if you see any difference in health. Thank you!
Even if a study found a correlation, it'd be much more likely that a shared cause was involved. For example, people who are too poor to own cars are also more likely to have health problems.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gvillesux View Post
why, public transportation will put you in close proximity to much more disease and illness on a regular basis.
In that case, bus drivers would be the worst off -- all the stress of driving, all the microbes of public transit!
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Old 01-02-2020, 06:57 PM
 
1,749 posts, read 506,255 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gvillesux View Post
why, public transportation will put you in close proximity to much more disease and illness on a regular basis.
And possible violence.

As far as stress, I guess you have to weigh "driving yourself in traffic / paying for gas and vehicle maintenance / vehicle breakdowns" against "dealing with other people / not being able to control how you travel in traffic (and the commute possibly being longer end-to-end due to stops, waiting for buses, transfers, etc.) / getting to and waiting for buses / bus or route breakdowns or delays." I'm surprised no one has mentioned the stress of dealing with other people and their noise, quirks, disputes over seats, plus some people simply dislike being in crowds.
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Old 01-02-2020, 08:18 PM
 
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Well, I think public transportation riders may have a stronger immunity due to their daily exposure to all kinds of germs and there is also less stress in dealing with traffic, you can just read a book and relax or do stuff on your phone. There are stressors on public transportation though: having to wait for a bus/train, rowdy kids, inconsiderate people (clipping nails, etc.), things like that. I couldn't deal with driving every day to work, I am very happy to take public transportation.

I almost forgot, recently I got spat on by a mentally ill passenger, didn't get my face just my purse, but yes, that is one of the things - lots of "interesting" people ride public transportation, too.
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Old 01-02-2020, 10:55 PM
 
10,318 posts, read 6,793,599 times
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What about the extreme stress of getting up early and home late to catch a bus in all weather because someone cant afford a car?
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Old Yesterday, 10:40 AM
 
6,105 posts, read 7,072,452 times
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I agree there are just too many factors to make a broad statement.

I would lean towards public transit commuting being a little healthier if the transit system is decent. But if you have to worry about unreliable or infrequent service, overcrowding, solving the "last mile" of the commute, and overcrowding, then it becomes pretty stressful.

The positives are that you are outside in your community and around people in a way that isn't as isolating, dangerous, or sedentary as driving. Also you might be able to have one less car at home, or even no car, which eliminates a lot of stress and costs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by K12144 View Post
And possible violence.
I've had far more "encounters" from drivers with road rage than with people on the bus.
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Old Yesterday, 11:46 AM
 
Location: Southern California
12,515 posts, read 11,077,195 times
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It all evens out in the end. There's good and bad to both.
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