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Old 01-20-2020, 12:51 AM
 
1,056 posts, read 291,474 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tzaphkiel View Post
go to Al-Anon and stick with it. (different program than AA or NA)
Al-Anon is for those who are involved in the life of a alcoholic/addict, like a spouse, sibling, etc. It’s a 12-step program, like AA or NA. These 12-step programs have kept people sober and sane. But this person needs to safely detox first.
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Old 01-20-2020, 02:31 AM
 
1,022 posts, read 1,171,594 times
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AA has a success rate of 7-14%. Do the research.

That is not a good success rate.

There are other programs.


Quote:
Originally Posted by CLfan1977 View Post
There are no shortcuts. Ask your doctor for advice/referral.

Speaking from experience with addiction (alcohol), AA or NA works if you want it enough. If you aren’t willing to take suggestions from those who are clean and sober, nothing works.
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Old 01-20-2020, 05:36 AM
 
2,773 posts, read 1,711,767 times
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It sounds like you probably need an inpatient rehab program with medication assisted therapy to quit. You also need to cut ties with anyone you use with and any triggers you have. Delete your dealers number etc.

There’s an opiate forum on reddit that may offer some advice on quitting but one of the first steps is to realize you aren’t a victim at all. You chose to put yourself in this situation and now you’re choosing to get yourself out of it - which is awesome!! Once you own the situation you can control it.

People do use kratom to stop but I think it can be addictive. I don’t know enough about it and what I do know is from having a friend who went through something similar. Methadone helped him stop and then he weaned off the methadone over time under medical supervision. Good luck, you can do this!
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Old 01-20-2020, 09:24 AM
 
440 posts, read 157,670 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ellenrr View Post
AA has a success rate of 7-14%. Do the research.

That is not a good success rate.

There are other programs.
But it’s at least as successful as anything else. Relapse is a symptom of the disease of addiction. The 12-step model isn’t for everyone but after a medically supervised detox, it can be an effective way to remain sober after initially stopping use of the chemical. In OP’s situation, fentanyl calls for a doctor’s care. The harder part is staying off—that’s where support groups help.
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Old 01-20-2020, 11:53 AM
 
2,012 posts, read 3,074,153 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sudsy03101 View Post
I find myself a "victim" of the opioid epidemic.
What started as recreational use has become a outrageous habit. 10 grams a day of fentanyl. Not straight fent, I cut it 100:1. So 1/10th of a gram a day. I can't function without it. I'm out of control. I've been to aa and na but I just couldn't stomach some of the things I heard.
If aa works for people I think it's great. But it will never work for me.
What other options are there?
Having studied neurology for the past couple of years, I can tell you that the addiction has created a circuit of neurons in your brain (from the extreme overload of dopamine) that can never be removed completely. The key is you have to weaken those circuits and replace them with newer, stronger ones by creating new habits for yourself such as music, sports, etc.

Now, this won't be easy. Your usage has led to constant levels of high dopamine production, which over time causes a buildup of a specific protein in the brain called Delta Fos B. This has tricked your brain into thinking you need the opiods for your body to survive. It literally thinks you cannot exist without the drugs.

You are going to have withdrawals from dopamine deprivation when you quit. You're going to feel low, have emotional outbursts for no reason. But before you begin, you have to understand that, and be willing to not only accept, but embrace these withdrawals as part of the healing process for your brain.

It takes about 28 days for the Delta Fos B protein to break down and be removed from the reward circuit in the brain, and after that it gets easier. Not easy mind you, just easier.

You're doctor can give you things for the physical withdrawals, but the brain is all powerful and will, for a time, try and lead you back to the drug use, and will make you miserable when you resist. You are in a battle with your own brain, not the drug itself, and I wish you the absolute best on that journey.

SS
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Old 01-20-2020, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Northern VA
551 posts, read 687,094 times
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Why do some people get addicted to opioids and others don't? Is there something in an individual's body chemistry that makes them more or less likely to become addicted? I've had several major surgeries over the last few years followed by several weeks to a month or more of prescribed opioids. Not once have I suffered withdrawal symptoms or tried to finagle extending the prescriptions.

I think it was one of the PAs I saw after a surgery that told me the state basically was limiting opioid prescriptions to a max of 72 hours. If the issue truly needs opioids, then 72 hours is probably not enough time for recovery.
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Old 01-20-2020, 04:19 PM
 
2,825 posts, read 1,207,558 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sudsy03101 View Post
I find myself a "victim" of the opioid epidemic.
What started as recreational use has become a outrageous habit. 10 grams a day of fentanyl. Not straight fent, I cut it 100:1. So 1/10th of a gram a day. I can't function without it. I'm out of control. I've been to aa and na but I just couldn't stomach some of the things I heard.
If aa works for people I think it's great. But it will never work for me.
What other options are there?

There is no softer easier way.


Your best option is going to one meeting a day for 90 days. You have to do the work.
I used to think a 12 step program wasn't for me but one day I just got a light bulb moment.. if it worked for millions of addicts around the world then why won't it work for me? So I st about making the program work for me. I did what the program told me to do. I stopped resisting.

Sounds like you are still resisting help. The 12 steps are designed to heal and build character and new neuro pathways. It is a life long way of life.

You might be one of those people who need a bit more than meetings. I myself spent 8 months in a rehab, attended meetings all the way through and been sober since.
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Old 01-20-2020, 06:26 PM
 
13,027 posts, read 16,002,675 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djplourd View Post
Why do some people get addicted to opioids and others don't?

I think it was one of the PAs I saw after a surgery that told me the state basically was limiting opioid prescriptions to a max of 72 hours. If the issue truly needs opioids, then 72 hours is probably not enough time for recovery.
no different than alcohol really...some people feel they got to have it some people don't.

If I were limited to opioids for just 72 hours after my last laminectomy I would have suffered horrendously, and probably not healed as fast. I needed them for at least 10 days before I tapered off over a week.
Lots of people I know end up back at the hospital (huge cost) just because the docs didn't give them proper adequate pain control...tylenol seems to be their best choice, and proves over and over to be of little use.

Opioids have been the gold standard of pain control for many years...it's ridiculous that post surgical patients are made to suffer because the doc fears retribution, which is really what it all boils down to when they refuse them for you...only a very small percentage of patients prescribed post surgical opioids go on to become addicts.
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Old 01-20-2020, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Northern NJ
8,651 posts, read 8,312,439 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djplourd View Post
Why do some people get addicted to opioids and others don't? Is there something in an individual's body chemistry that makes them more or less likely to become addicted? I've had several major surgeries over the last few years followed by several weeks to a month or more of prescribed opioids. Not once have I suffered withdrawal symptoms or tried to finagle extending the prescriptions.

I think it was one of the PAs I saw after a surgery that told me the state basically was limiting opioid prescriptions to a max of 72 hours. If the issue truly needs opioids, then 72 hours is probably not enough time for recovery.
Why do some people smoke? It’s so clearly stupid, yet there we are. I took one drag as a kid and my lungs told me all I needed to know. Drugs never attracted me at all, stoners were the lowest form of life to me. My mother was an alcoholic, so that took care of that. Although red wine at gatherings is something I don’t mind.

Some people seem to have natural protection from addiction - they observe the effects and stay the heck away.
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Old 01-21-2020, 07:37 PM
 
3,138 posts, read 1,221,742 times
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For people interested in this subject (I am because I first learned about it before most people, being in the property-casualty insurance industry and seeing a lot of addiction among patients with back injuries), last week's Freakonomics podcast covered the "How did we get here?" aspect. The American Pain Society trademarked the slogan "Pain: The Fifth Vital Sign" and pushed opoids as a non-addictive means to treat pain. They also promoted the idea that a successful outcome of any treatment was zero pain. After a Senate investigation they went belly-up in 2017 but we're living with the consequences. One interview was with a doctor who idly took one left over from an injury when he had had a hard day and it alleviated his anxiety. He was doing surgery, making rounds, seeing patients- and was up to 100 Hydrocodone per day before he went into rehab. He git prescriptions form doctor friends and would raid the medicine cabinet anywhere he visited.

One out of every 5 Americans has a leftover stash of opioids at home. I'll admit I do- they were prescribed for my late husband and I haven't touched them.
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