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Old Today, 02:20 PM
 
470 posts, read 154,308 times
Reputation: 630

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryleeII View Post
Last week I went to a first visit with a new PCP. My previous doctor had retired and I received a letter from the administration stating that this doctor was willing to take over as my new primary care physician. I expected the transfer to go smoothly, as both doctors were in the same group.
How about looking up the reviews on this new doctor and read what other patients say about her at:
~ HealthGrades.com
~ RateMDs.com
~ Vitals.com

You could also leave a comment on that CNA's less-than-professional attitude.
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Old Today, 02:20 PM
 
782 posts, read 251,078 times
Reputation: 1526
Quote:
Originally Posted by Travelassie View Post
Reading through your "rant", it seems to me that your poor attitude towards your health care providers comes through loud and clear. Such an attitude makes you look at things in the worst possible light, instead of in a more reasonable perspective, and it comes through to your providers as well. Neither of these things do you any favors, or help you get any type of desired outcomes to your healthcare.

First of all, your animosity towards the CNA for "pretending to be a nurse" was uncalled for, she wore a nametag showing her position in the office and the narrative in your post show only that she carried out the duties assigned to her as a CNA.

And you decide you won't like this new doctor based on your perception of what happened before she came in to see you? And you decide these providers view you "with suspicion and hostility", judge you as a "doctor shopper", "drug seeker" based only on same, despite no evidence that this waa the case? Sorry, but you're only hurting yourself with this attitude, and sabotaging any chance you might have at developing a healthy relationship with a healthcare provider.

IIRC you're over 65, so you would be on Medicare, am I right?
In this case those questions asked of you come from Medicare. They are asked of every Medicare recipient, and any primary provider is obligated to ask those questions document the responses. If they don't do so, or miss any of the questions, they are "dinged" by Medicare (ie, their reimbursements for Medicare services are cut) for "failing to provide quality care". So you can be sure they will attempt to get answers to those questions, though for any questions you think are too intrusive or you don't care to answer for any reason, a "declined to answer" is a valid response. I know I have declined to answer a number of those questions myself for questions I thought were no one's business, and the providers in that case agreed with me, dutifully answered "declined to answer" and that was that.

I can imagine there are overzealous doctor's office staff members who might try and intimidate a patient into answering questions they're uncomfortable answering, but they are out of line doing so and this can be pointed out to them (I know I would). But it might surprise you to know that many providers don't like and wish they didn't have to ask those questions and wouldn't do it without that Medicare reimbursement hatchet hanging over their heads. My own PCP has stated as much to me when I've seen her.

Just give this some thought, won't you, as you wait for that next appointment? Unfortunately as a Medicare recipient, you won't escape those questions from any Medicare primary care provider. But they can be handled without undue grief and stress on your part.
Why should the patient have to put up with those ridiculous questions? Most are none of Medicare's business. With the first question the patient should say Enough! I refuse to answer so dont ask! None of Medicares business!
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Old Today, 02:45 PM
 
1,305 posts, read 347,809 times
Reputation: 1919
Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post
Well, I guess my future physicians are going to be completely out of luck, since I have zero emergency contacts.

There is literally no one who cares whether I live or die.
same
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Old Today, 02:46 PM
 
1,305 posts, read 347,809 times
Reputation: 1919
The questions wouldn’t bother me (OP)
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Old Today, 02:54 PM
 
2,741 posts, read 1,464,730 times
Reputation: 11621
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryleeII View Post


I realize the questions I was asked were some sort of standard survey they ask every new patient, they weren't made special just for me, but at the same time I felt this particular doctor was screening her new patients for potential trouble-makers.

I think you answered your own question.
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Old Today, 03:01 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
10,318 posts, read 7,545,287 times
Reputation: 15790
Quote:
Originally Posted by Williepaws View Post
Why should the patient have to put up with those ridiculous questions? Most are none of Medicare's business. With the first question the patient should say Enough! I refuse to answer so dont ask! None of Medicares business!

That's your perogative. But your beef should be with Medicare, not with the providers. Talk to your Congressman.
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Old Today, 03:13 PM
 
503 posts, read 212,305 times
Reputation: 1383
When I went to the Doc, I think I would have enjoyed it if some cute young CNA asked me these questions. I could have had some fun.

Instead, they just gave me the questionnaire and a pen and asked me to fill it out. I guess they figured that I could read and write. Generous of them.
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Old Today, 03:13 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
9,405 posts, read 5,813,519 times
Reputation: 34675
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgardener View Post
I think you answered your own question.
Perhaps not.

I related my experience in this space before about how my PCP was getting yelled at electronically because he spent too much time with me during appointments. So I get Marylee's concern about being perceived as trouble and perhaps costing the practice more money (time) than they anticipate she would be worth.

Doctors do fire patients from time to time.
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Old Today, 03:30 PM
 
1,949 posts, read 638,485 times
Reputation: 5209
Two of my older friends warned me that the questions get very intrusive once you are on Medicare. I was a social worker and the best way to obtain information is to build rapport over time instead of grilling people. The first time I was asked if I was sexually active I answered. The next visit I said my husband had prostrate cancer so figure it out and I never want to be asked this again as it’s painful. They made a note of it. The most references I have been asked for is 2 . I put my husband and then my son. They said they only contact the second one if the first one cannot be reached. People don’t automatically become kids in need of supervision once they turn 65. My mom lived alone a week before of cancer she died at 89. She battled cancer for 3 years. All 3 of us lived out of town but came to stay with her when really needed. She didn’t want to live with any of us or go into a home. Was she completely safe? No but she died living how she wanted to. Unless a parent has dementia they should never be forced to be safe.
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Old Today, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
5,061 posts, read 3,990,884 times
Reputation: 9515
Quote:
Originally Posted by Williepaws View Post
If it had been a man who fell off their horse, no one would ever ask in a million years if it was his wife that caused it.
I'm a man, and some years back when I stabbed myself in the hand while cutting open a package, intake at the emergency room involved questions like "do you live alone?" and "do you feel safe right now?" It has nothing to do with stereotyping.

Those who do medical intake have a set of standard protocols they have to follow (including asking certain questions) to be in compliance with state and federal laws as well as their professional codes of ethics. It has nothing to do with the gender of the person. When I was a licensed mental health provider, I had to ask certain things if I suspected a person visiting the agency or calling on the phone was a danger to himself/herself or others. None of the questions had "If the caller is a man" or "If the caller is a woman" next to them.
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