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Old 02-11-2020, 09:30 AM
 
Location: Jollyville, TX
3,964 posts, read 9,679,910 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trusso11783 View Post
What is the medical difference between A Fib and palpitations? How would anyone of us know the difference? The problem with my cardiologist allowing me to come by if this is happening is that it is almost never during business hours. It is usually when I am already sleeping or relaxing and about to go to sleep.what would you have done in my case the other night? The palpitations began around midnight and continued all the way through 6 or 7 am when I finally passed out in my car while it was running. I nearly admitted myself 5 different times. But I didn’t. And if I did, they would have released me because it stopped around 6 or 7 am and hasn't rEturned since.
Here is a good explanation of what afib is: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-...s/syc-20350624

If yours is going away on its own after a few hours, your risks are low. When I went to the ER, they performed an EKG and determined that I was in afib. It's a particular set of rhythms that is easily detected on the EKG readout. It's not really necessary to go the the ER when an event occurs, but in your case, you need to find out if it's just tachycardia (fast heart rate) or if it is indeed afib. The only way to do that is to have an EKG or use a monitor during an event.

To your earlier question about an Apple watch - I did the research and decided that a $100 heart monitor was a better solution for me than a $500 watch.
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Old 02-11-2020, 11:11 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
10,361 posts, read 7,577,916 times
Reputation: 15833
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parnassia View Post
Which apparently, the cardio doc has already dismissed. OP just doesn't believe it. Which is why he needs to look into the connection with anxiety.
The apparent willingness of the cardiologist to dismiss the OP's symptoms based only on their relative infrequency, without at least an attempt to see what's going on there would be concerning to me. The causes might well be inocuous, but "palpitations" can feel the same whether they are caused by relatively benign PVCs, A-fib, or a ventricular tachycardia. If these palpitations are repetitive, last for a while, and especially if they are accompanied by lightheadedness, shortness of breath, or chest discomfort (and I thought I recalled a mention in one of the OPs posts that he passed out during one of these episodes), they really do need to be checked out.

Any cardiologist knows the intermittent nature of heart arrythymias, knows these may occur when they feel like it, sometimes infrequently. They also know that there are monitors out there that can be used for longer periods of time
to catch these infrequent episodes. So for the OP's cardiologist to dismiss the OP's issues based on their occuring less frequently than his 24 hour office Holter monitor will detect, well, in the OP's shoes I'd probably seek help elsewhere.

I sure as he!! wouldn't dismiss the OP's issues as "anxiety" before other causes are ruled out.
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Old 02-11-2020, 11:48 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
10,361 posts, read 7,577,916 times
Reputation: 15833
Quote:
Originally Posted by trusso11783 View Post
What is the medical difference between A Fib and palpitations? How would anyone of us know the difference? The problem with my cardiologist allowing me to come by if this is happening is that it is almost never during business hours. It is usually when I am already sleeping or relaxing and about to go to sleep.what would you have done in my case the other night? The palpitations began around midnight and continued all the way through 6 or 7 am when I finally passed out in my car while it was running. I nearly admitted myself 5 different times. But I didn’t. And if I did, they would have released me because it stopped around 6 or 7 am and hasn't rEturned since.
"Palpitations" is the term used for the symptoms you feel when your heart is beating in some manner out of its normal rhythm. This would include the "flip-flops"-described by some as a fish out of water flopping (though whether it's a minnow or a blue whale doing the flopping varies among the palpitation sufferers, LOL), or flutters, the sensation that your heart is pounding, or skipping beats followed by flops, vibrations the feeling that there is a chainsaw running in your chest, descriptions vary. You can feel these palpitations with any number of arrhythmias, including afib, other supraventricular tachycardias, ventricular tachycardias, or even PVCs, or PACs. So you can't determine what is happening just based on those palpitations, which is why when they are troublesome it's important to get them checked out. It may well be a benign process, maybe brought on by stress, caffeine, alcohol, too many decongestants, but it might also be a condition that requires some attention (such as afib). Either way it would ease your mind, get you on the road to handling the beast to identify what's going on.

As I mentioned in another post, IMO it's concerning that your cardiologist seems to be blowing off your symptoms based only on their infrequency (ie, less frequent than might be picked up on one of his office Holter monitors). Have you informed him of any symptoms (shortness of breath, lightheadness, or especially passing out during one of those episodes), and how long they last? Cardiologists know the intermittent nature of arrhythmias, and know there are monitors out there that can be worn for up to 30 days or so, which would pick up those evening, night episodes you say you have about weekly. Generally these monitors are ordered from cardiac monitoring companies by the physician, you wear them for the prescribed length of time, send the monitor back when it's done and results are sent to the physician.

Your cardiologist would be well aware of these monitors, and should not be just putting you off because he doesn't believe a Holter monitor would pick up any abnormal cardiac EKG activity within a 24-48 hour timespan. In your shoes, if he won't help you, I'd find another doctor (cardiologist, or even your primary care doctor) to help you.
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Old 02-11-2020, 12:39 PM
 
780 posts, read 316,458 times
Reputation: 2719
Travelassie gives good advice. I've had to search for the right doctor in the past that cared as much as I did about my symptoms (not heart so far). They are not all the same. If I or my spouse had a symptom of passing out I would keep looking for answers and from a doctor who did not dismiss my concerns.

I've learned a lot on this thread about different kinds of palpitations, thanks for that.
In my 30's I had heart arrythmia/palpitations that luckily showed up on an echo in-office at cardio doc. even though it was intermittent. It went away with no RX or other treatment and that was 30 years ago. No passing out however. Our bodies are mysterious.
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Old 02-11-2020, 11:32 PM
 
1,381 posts, read 919,447 times
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I have never passed out in my life, let alone from the palpitations. I get no shortness of breathe or dizzy. Just a weird feeling in my chest. I have taken my heat rate using a stop watch and it is usually 68. The day I went to the ER, it was 100 or so, but that was when I was just sitting and relaxing. That was too fast for me so I thought it was serious. I have a stethoscope and when I Listened, it sounded like 3 or 4 beats and no beat, then another few beats and no Beat. The other night when I was sitting outside the ER all night, I didn’t measure but it didn’t feel too fast but it did feel throbbing. In other words, normally, I don’t hear or feel my heart beat. When I feel it or hear it, it is beating harder than usual. For me, that isn’t normal.

Again, I am on no medications at all, ever, only have one cup of coffee a day at the most and dont drink alcohol. Maybe 5 -10 drinks a year, depending on the occasion. Oddly, I did have 1 Corona beer the other night. I can’t be that much of a lightweight, can I?

I want to go to the cardio physicist as was suggested to me be a couple of people. I am also not thrilled about my cardiologist dismissing this. He wouldn’t give me the monitor the night of the stress test but said I can come anytime and pick it up if this happens again. I am mostly concerned that it is happening now. Nothing has changed in my life in years. No more stress than usual. When this first happened to me in a December, I was only a month older than November, and it never happened in my life before. So why now? I appreciate all of the responses. I am ordering the monitor. So far, nothing really since the other night, though I think a felt a few this morning but they quickly stopped. I barely noticed.
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Old 02-12-2020, 12:42 AM
 
2,182 posts, read 1,270,830 times
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>>I went back into afib to stay and I'll very likely be there for the rest of my life,>>>

I've had A-fib off and on for many years. My cardiologist schedules cardioversion at the hospital and that fixes it. There's also an ablation procedure that is pretty easy, it only requires an overnight stay and usually works long term although sometimes patients need a second ablation.

I now take several meds including eliquis. I still have a-fib occasionally but it rarely lasts more than 15 minutes. One evening it lasted a couple of hours. I never know why it starts or why it stops. It always starts in the evening, a few hours after dinner.
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Old 02-12-2020, 12:48 AM
 
2,182 posts, read 1,270,830 times
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>>cardio physiologist<<

I see one for a-fib but they seem to be rarer than hen's teeth.

He had me wear a monitor for a couple of weeks but of course nothing happened during that time.

A-fib won't kill you as long as you take a blood thinner but it can be annoying and scary when you don't know what it is.

A-fib often runs in families. My father started having it in his 50's. Do either of your parents have it?
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Old 02-12-2020, 06:12 AM
 
Location: A safe distance from San Francisco
9,341 posts, read 6,565,248 times
Reputation: 9684
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrassTacksGal View Post
>>I went back into afib to stay and I'll very likely be there for the rest of my life,>>>

I've had A-fib off and on for many years. My cardiologist schedules cardioversion at the hospital and that fixes it. There's also an ablation procedure that is pretty easy, it only requires an overnight stay and usually works long term although sometimes patients need a second ablation.

I now take several meds including eliquis. I still have a-fib occasionally but it rarely lasts more than 15 minutes. One evening it lasted a couple of hours. I never know why it starts or why it stops. It always starts in the evening, a few hours after dinner.
I'm well aware of the options available to afib patients for restoring sinus rhythm. Cardio-version (which comes with some inherent risk) that must be repeated time and time again is pointless. And I want no part of any invasive procedures that come with significant risk, lots of expense for the minimally insured, and also offer no guarantee that you will not return to afib. They are cash cows for the medical industry and offer little benefit to patients. Modern cardiology can be summed up that way generally....it is a gargantuan cash cow.

Simple rate control with Eliquis for minimizing stroke risk is, by far, my best option in that my symptoms are minimal.
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Old 02-12-2020, 07:26 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
10,361 posts, read 7,577,916 times
Reputation: 15833
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrownVic95 View Post
I'm well aware of the options available to afib patients for restoring sinus rhythm. Cardio-version (which comes with some inherent risk) that must be repeated time and time again is pointless. And I want no part of any invasive procedures that come with significant risk, lots of expense for the minimally insured, and also offer no guarantee that you will not return to afib. They are cash cows for the medical industry and offer little benefit to patients. Modern cardiology can be summed up that way generally....it is a gargantuan cash cow.

Simple rate control with Eliquis for minimizing stroke risk is, by far, my best option in that my symptoms are minimal.
That's you, everyone is different. Might be another story if you were in constant symptomatic afib and it was ruining your life. But glad you are happy with your afib control.
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Old 02-12-2020, 09:38 AM
 
Location: A safe distance from San Francisco
9,341 posts, read 6,565,248 times
Reputation: 9684
Quote:
Originally Posted by Travelassie View Post
That's you, everyone is different. Might be another story if you were in constant symptomatic afib and it was ruining your life. But glad you are happy with your afib control.
Completely extraneous, unnecessary, and abrasive comment. This is why you're on ignore....but every now and then I foolishly open a post to see who it was directed to. I must maintain more discipline.

I stand by every word I posted, including the assessment that modern cardiology is a gargantuan cash cow. No afib patient needs an ablation and nowhere near as many who have stents need them. Do some research and you'll see that more and more doctors agree. But in the short-term, interventional cardiologists are mining gold as fast as they can.

Last edited by CrownVic95; 02-12-2020 at 09:49 AM..
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