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Old 06-18-2020, 11:35 AM
 
Location: NJ
13,435 posts, read 23,087,436 times
Reputation: 12426

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
I believe the point that some of us are trying to make is: spending money on a personal trainer over seeing a doctor is not what most would think of as a wise move. And probably not going to be much help. Basic lower back pain is something that will only be helped with shots, maybe a chiropractor or last, but not least surgery. Oh a heat or ice pad can give some relief, but a personal trainer may claim he/she can help but they will just take your money and not do much else.
Agree it's spending money on something they don't know if it will help or hurt more.

I have one great doctor for injections, he used to do them in his office but doesn't any more. I wouldn't go to just anyone either. I've had many injections before being fused, some work, some don't. Every one that he's given me have helped because he found the problem areas. Pain management doctors have changed a lot in the 20 years since originally hurting my back. I wish I didn't fuse with rods and screws.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Parnassia View Post
Getting a diagnosis from a professional who can take advantage of imaging and other diagnostic tools would be my first step. Not simply to get an idea why I have chronic back pain but also to help me avoid activity that might make the underlying problem worse. You're in pain now. Why on earth would you risk MORE? Once you know what the problem is (or what it isn't) then you can direct your own efforts from there most effectively. If that includes finding a personal trainer, getting PT, icing-heat-anti-inflammatory therapy, or simply using a home grown exercise regimen, so be it. If the problem won't be helped by something, I'd really want to know to avoid injuring myself or wasting my meager money. Kind of a penny-wise pound-foolish thing.
Bolding for truth.

The OP really needs to spend the personal trainer money on seeing a doctor to find out exactly what's wrong before they hurt themselves more.

I'd try to apply for Obamacare or your state run insurance.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cheapdad00 View Post
This x1000 OP. I have had back pain for the past 5 or so years - same as the OP - hurts to stand (could not stand in place for more than 3-5 minutes without having to bend over to stretch) but walking was OK. I just started going to doctor last year to help determine what it was. After an X-ray which showed some narrowing between lower discs but they weren't touching, they had me do a course of PT (apparently insurance wanted to see that before approving an MRI, since the pain wasn't keeping me doubled over in pain all the time.) Eventually got to the point where I could stand for about 10 min without pain, but then that regressed a bit (3 months worth of PT plus following the regimen at home on days I didnt physically go to PT). Beginning of this year I had an MRI where they saw my sciatic nerve was impinged by inflamation and offered either cortisone shots or a laminectomy. They said with shots usually if you are going to feel relief, it is within 24-48 hours but sometimes you need a couple of doses in succession before they take effect. Had 1st set of shots in Feb, they didn't do much. Had 2nd round in March right before world shut down (and they didn't do much either). Fast forward 6 weeks to end of April and my back is almost back to normal. I still feel it if I overdue it by standing for too long or sit in my work chair for too long, but for the most part I can stand and walk without pain - very refreshing. Also, I have reduced the frequency at which I perform the exercises (from daily to 3 times per week) but have upped my walking and am lifting weights again. My point is that good imaging will help focus a treatment plan and potentially let you get to relief faster.
Stay away from the laminectomy. It either helps or makes you worst. I'm fused due to it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by goldenlove View Post
I've had hip and lower back pain for a bit over a year now. I finally broke down and went to a foot store that sells orthotics. That was my first step to fixing my issue because the owner mentioned that my right arch had collapsed (and it had, I just didn't realize it) which is why my left hip was in so much pain. Second, I found that I had developed bursitis in that same hip and got a steroid shot in it, which has also been super helpful. I'll need a second shot at some point, but I am in much less pain than before. When my hip hurt, so did my lower back, it all seemed to be tied together. I do have insurance though, through the marketplace. That might be an option for you?
Agree that arches will affect your back. I have really high arches. I can't wear my inserts any more though.
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Old 06-22-2020, 08:21 PM
Status: "I luvvvvvvv pagpag." (set 17 hours ago)
 
Location: Brawndo-Thirst-Mutilator-Nation
17,972 posts, read 18,161,281 times
Reputation: 14629
I stretch and do exercises for my lower-back at least once a week....it has worked wonders
for my bad back.
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Old 06-22-2020, 08:37 PM
 
Location: Southern California
28,007 posts, read 10,534,716 times
Reputation: 17879
Quote:
Originally Posted by tickyul View Post
I stretch and do exercises for my lower-back at least once a week....it has worked wonders
for my bad back.
Once a week!! I do them a couple times daily, first thing before I start my day, always on my bed. If I got on the floor, I would not get up.
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Old 06-23-2020, 12:21 PM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
76,005 posts, read 88,894,681 times
Reputation: 46835
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
Once a week!! I do them a couple times daily, first thing before I start my day, always on my bed. If I got on the floor, I would not get up.
I do stretching most of the time and do a few morning exercises while still in bed. Agree I wouldn't attempt to get on the floor. I can get down on my knees if I have to, but that is rare and getting rarer every month. I would imagine, unless there is no choice I will never even get on my knees again.
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Old 06-24-2020, 02:27 PM
 
9,349 posts, read 8,149,818 times
Reputation: 7809
Given the amount of time you walk or bike, it seems to be a non-issue.

Learn the proper form for bicycle riding. Back pain should not occur.

Don't do ab exercises if you have a bad back. You're making it worse.

Get some support brace or belt for your back for exercises.
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Old 06-29-2020, 06:27 PM
 
25 posts, read 2,355 times
Reputation: 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by SlowMotionApocalypse View Post
For 15 years.


No health insurance, haven't been to doctor in decades as a matter of fact.


Standing a long time for example is very difficult though oddly enough I can walk for several miles before I start to feel it, or pedal on a stationary bike for 30 to 60 mins before the pain starts to set in.



Was content to accept is as a fact of life all these years, except somehow the rest of me is getting into much better shape. As in lost almost 50 lbs since 2018 and really toned muscles from resistance band training. This was almost accidental.



Now I am trying to work on strengthening my core and even following YouTube low impact ab exercises and back pain exercises, seems like I am just hurting my back more.



So while back pain was something to be lived with and ignored, core/ab training is very important to me.



Should I find a personal trainer to help me find a program or how do I find out exactly what is causing my back to hurt so I can try to figure out how to proceed from there?


(Note, I do not have health insurance. Employer based health insurance is not an option because I don't have a job or any plans to get one. I do have savings I might be able to drain to a degree to improve my quality of life however).

If you have back problems, it is not the back it is you. you are doing something wrong. Find it, correct it and the pain will be gone.

(Aside from obviously advanced diseases that involve bone distortions)

OP, aside from the obvious offenders:

Office chair - that is wrong for you, trying to change is a start.
Bed- if the bed is too hard it puts pressure on your hips and arms and cut circulation to your lower back causing pain. If bed is too soft it causes unnatural curvature in your spine causing pain.
So bed should be hard overall to avoid spine caving but with soft top - pillow top soft - to avoid stress points.
Sitting on a soft frumpy sofa for hours watching TV... can be a huge contributor.

Stationary bike is notorious to cause back problems. People think that the horizontal position is ideal for workout, no, it is not, it is actually horrible and can damage the spine entirely. Humans are not for paw animals therefore they should not work in suspended horizontal position for extended amount of time.
You need to work out more vertically while on the bike to begin healing.

Also take a few week break to let your back to hear. Just as you can not walk on broken leg or ride on flat tire without causing damage you need to stop and let it heal before you resume. Use heat pads and choose positions that do NOT put any stress on your back.

This is good reading:
https://bicycleuniverse.com/cycling-...o_Correct_Them

Cycling Seat Positions that Cause Lower Back Pain and How to Correct Them
Yes, cycling has beneficial effects in strengthening and stabilizing back muscles and the hips, shoulders, and spine. However, it can be a cause of lower back pain too!

You can easily strain your back if you don’t maintain proper posture. Leaning over with your back too arched up or too curved down with the head fully facing forward is very bad posture.
To let your upper body absorb the impact of riding instead of your spine, try to keep your arm bent slightly when riding. Do not fully extend your leg when on the downward stroke, your seat should be just the right height, so your knees have a little bend to them.
On top of the stroke, the knees should have an angle of no less than 90 degrees. This is kinder to your lower back.
While cycling long distances, you can change up the angle and position of your torso every now and then, so the muscle does not stiffen up and become overly fatigued from maintaining one position throughout the ride.


Humans Did Not Evolve To Ride Bikes
Fitting cave-dwellers to a Victorian contraption. Is this the best we can do? Discuss?
https://www.cyclefit.co.uk/journal/h...-to-ride-bikes
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Old 06-29-2020, 06:29 PM
 
25 posts, read 2,355 times
Reputation: 40
Also shoes. Make sure that you have good supporting shoes.
The flooring where you stand for a longer times should not be hard like stone tiles kind.
If you stand and cook - you should have something under your feet, either rug with a pad
o a rubber chef's pad.
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Old 06-30-2020, 06:05 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
76,005 posts, read 88,894,681 times
Reputation: 46835
Quote:
Originally Posted by Palladio View Post
Also shoes. Make sure that you have good supporting shoes.
The flooring where you stand for a longer times should not be hard like stone tiles kind.
If you stand and cook - you should have something under your feet, either rug with a pad
o a rubber chef's pad.
Very true and very good advise.
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Old Today, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Bay Area
1,163 posts, read 788,904 times
Reputation: 703
]I have been dealing with degenerative disc disease & stenosis in the lumbar spine & cervical spine for several years. I retired out early from a rather physical job because of it. Since early 2016, I have been not able to drive or walk very far do to radicular symptoms caused by nerve root distribution compression in the lumbar spine. So, I order everything I need or want, including groceries, online and have it delivered since 2016. Picking anything over about 5 lbs aggravates the condition. The most troubling symptom/s are a sudden feeling the right leg will give out, numb feeling in right foot, tiredness in right leg and bilateral muscle stiffness. Setting position can be problematic....leaning forward a bit or tilting toward my hip while stetting helps.......but, that type of posture over time is not good for my neck issues. I have had several lumbar epidural injections at the HMO (Kaiser) I was a member of for decades......but, they were of little or no help. When I went on Medicare last year, I opted to leave Kaiser. A orthopedist I consulted at a UC Medical Center last year recommends decompression surgery. UC also told me epidural injections are less effective for my type of symptoms. I am giving Phys Ther one more try. I tried PT last year and it ended up aggravating the lumbar situation. I think I may not have had the best PT for me. Oh, I have had several cervical & lumbar MRIs over the years

Regarding sleep, if I sleep on my side and pull my knees up, I can pretty much sleep all night without symptoms. That position opens up the spine. Also, being on my hands and knees does not usually aggravate the lumbar issues......so, that allows be to do a number of chores that way......as long as I am careful in regard to lifting or pushing anything over a few pounds. I remain in the standing position most of the time and eat my breakfast that way. Stop & go walking around indoors at home is usually not a issue (unless the condition got aggravated) But, walking to the mailbox a 1/2 block away, usually requires stopping here and there one the way because the right leg symptoms and by the time I return, often the right foot starts to feel strange
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Old Today, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Bay Area
1,163 posts, read 788,904 times
Reputation: 703
https://aeon.co/essays/to-treat-back...-not-the-spine
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