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Old 04-07-2021, 03:56 PM
 
3,474 posts, read 2,299,291 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by old fed View Post
you're maybe thinking of an ultrasound in regards to the water
Actually, NOT. Remember, this is to distend the stomach...

I've never heard of ultrasound being used to do full imaging of the abdomen. It's not designed for that. It's used for focal imaging. Of course, you also have endoscopic ultrasound, but let's not hijack the thread.
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Old 04-07-2021, 04:00 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by orbiter View Post
At one of the CTScans, I had radioactive substance injected and had to wait an hour before the scan. But I can't recall now if I had to drink anything. They gave me a card to carry in my wallet ~ "There is a possibility that small amounts of radiation from the procedure may trigger detectors at airports or border crossings. The amount of radiation poses no danger to the public and is allowed according to CNSC regulations."
It was during the March / April "circuit breaker" lockdown.
A radioactive substance would be used in a nuclear medicine scan, usually a PET scan. They're different from CT, although it's now common to do a CT as part of the PET scan for anatomical localization purposes.

There have been huge advances in imaging in the past decade or so, through improvements in equipment and imaging agents. Docs can get some amazing views into our internals.
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Old 04-08-2021, 02:58 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbear99 View Post
Actually, NOT. Remember, this is to distend the stomach...

I've never heard of ultrasound being used to do full imaging of the abdomen. It's not designed for that. It's used for focal imaging. Of course, you also have an endoscopic ultrasound, but let's not hijack the thread.
I've been a CT Tech for 28 years and I have never given someone water to distend their stomach for a CT. Water is routinely given for US not CT, mostly for its ability to transmit sound waves and delineate structure. Water is capable of being used to complement or enhance CT imaging but since it is relatively ineffective it is rarely if ever used. Also, IV contrast can cause nausea and having something in the stomach can result in emesis and possible aspiration.
Contrast increases the density of the structure enhanced thereby increasing adjacent tissue contrast. Two common types are oral contrast and IV contrast. Oral contrast is falling out of favor in the last ten years because it really doesn't add a significant amount of info and it takes an hour to two hours for it to percolate through the GI system which means a wait and a diagnosis delay as well as aforementioned nausea and emesis related issues.
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Old 04-08-2021, 06:16 AM
 
3,474 posts, read 2,299,291 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Molokai100 View Post
I've been a CT Tech for 28 years and I have never given someone water to distend their stomach for a CT. Water is routinely given for US not CT, mostly for its ability to transmit sound waves and delineate structure. Water is capable of being used to complement or enhance CT imaging but since it is relatively ineffective it is rarely if ever used. Also, IV contrast can cause nausea and having something in the stomach can result in emesis and possible aspiration.
Contrast increases the density of the structure enhanced thereby increasing adjacent tissue contrast. Two common types are oral contrast and IV contrast. Oral contrast is falling out of favor in the last ten years because it really doesn't add a significant amount of info and it takes an hour to two hours for it to percolate through the GI system which means a wait and a diagnosis delay as well as aforementioned nausea and emesis related issues.
Interesting. I've had multiple abdominal CT scans where I was directed to drink a liter of water pre-scan to distend the stomach.

Maybe your institution uses a different protocol? My CTs were at Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, where they do a lot of triphasic abdominal cancer exams.
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Old 04-08-2021, 08:57 AM
 
Location: Fairfield, CT
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I just had one today. I didn't drink anything. They injected the liquid for the contrast.
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Old 04-08-2021, 09:27 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
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I have had many ultrasounds, CT scans, and mostly MRIs over the last 2 years being treated for cancer. Whether you need to fast, drink a lot of water, get contrast by mouth or vein depends on the body part(s) they are looking at. I no longer get contrast for abdominal imaging due to kidney problems.
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Old 04-08-2021, 10:44 AM
 
Location: St. Louis
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I’ve had three and I’m allergic to the iodine so they give me Benadryl ahead of time these days. Naturally I don’t drive myself to these appointments.
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Old 04-08-2021, 10:48 AM
 
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I've had both the drink and the IV. The drink is fine, just a sort of flat taste, but a lot to drink at once.

The IV stuff felt like heat both in the crotch and the roof of my mouth at the same time. A little weird, but nothing scary. It goes away pretty quickly and the scans have no physical feeling at all.
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Old 04-08-2021, 02:15 PM
 
172 posts, read 91,942 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbear99 View Post
Interesting. I've had multiple abdominal CT scans where I was directed to drink a liter of water pre-scan to distend the stomach.

Maybe your institution uses a different protocol? My CTs were at Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, where they do a lot of triphasic abdominal cancer exams.
I do mostly ER cases, acute-type stuff. I could see a specialized exam targeting a specific region could find it useful. Sounds like they (Radiologists, Oncologists) want to see the border between the liver and the stomach with detail. Time is everything with cancer and there isn't time to miss stuff
All protocols are devised and agreed upon by the guys reading the studies in nearly every institution so they all have their own unique peccadillos they insist on. The more they specialize the more this is the case but the opposite is also true. The broader the possible pathology might be, the more standardized and simple the tests become. Fishing expeditions in other words. Less focal as you say! Id say the vast majority of medical imaging falls into this category.
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Old Yesterday, 11:55 AM
 
16,011 posts, read 33,987,181 times
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In 2019 I was in the hospital for a serious blood clot in my leg. While there I had various tests including a cat scan, but the doctor did not elaborate on the details why he ordered it. I had to drink "stuff" mixed with Gatorade, and while it wasn't tasty I got it down OK. I do remember getting the hot feeling and feeling like I needed to pee, but that seemed to happen during the scan, not sure if I received any injection.
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