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Old 07-25-2022, 10:29 PM
 
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Go to a blood donor site and ask them to test for your blood type. They do it with a drop of blood with a finger prick. Maybe don't tell them that's all you are there for.


Ask your GP.


Go to the medical records department in the hospital and request a copy of your operation's records.
If you have a health insurance card you can use it as identification. It might help the employee find it more quickly.


Do you know if your doctor's records, tests, medications and medical procedures are kept by the State Health Dept. on a master electronic database? If so you might be able to register to have access to them online with SecureKey.
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Old 07-26-2022, 04:55 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
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I recall getting a written copy of my hospital records when I was discharged from a hospital stay. These records included results for the laboratory testing done preoperatively and during the hospital stay. These results would include ABO type/screening results, if they were done.


As Medical Lab Guy said, if the healthcare facility needs a patient's blood type and related testing ( ABO type and screen) information, it doesn't matter how long the patient has known his/her own blood type, or even how many "Golden Gallon"
blood donor cards he carries showing the blood type, the laboratory will repeat the testing. They cannot, by law, take the patient's word for it ( even if they were crazy enough to think they could.).
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Old 07-26-2022, 05:04 AM
 
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I assume one can ask their regular doctor to find out their blood type when doing routine blood tests. One doesn't need to wait to have surgery to find out.
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Old 07-26-2022, 05:23 AM
 
Location: Seymour TN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chava61 View Post
I assume one can ask their regular doctor to find out their blood type when doing routine blood tests. One doesn't need to wait to have surgery to find out.
I tried this, and no, they won't do it. It's a different kind of test that costs extra, the lab won't do it along with the CBC panel, etc.
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Old 07-26-2022, 05:24 AM
 
Location: Seymour TN
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Originally Posted by Fisherman99 View Post
They make you wear a disposable bracelet during surgical procedures which has your blood type right on it...noticed mine was AB- on a procedure I had years ago.
Nope, mine didn't have it on there.
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Old 07-26-2022, 07:47 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Fisherman99 View Post
Yep...my father also had AB- blood type. Not sure if the rarest is good or bad...
I think in this case, it's good, as AB- can receive any negative blood type (AB-, A-, B-, or O-).
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Old 07-26-2022, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Early America
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I saw my blood type on my medical record over 40 years ago and made a mental note to remember it...and then it disappeared and hasn't been there since.

I thought it was strange but then realized that excluding it from the record, or making it a hassle to find out from providers, incentivizes people to give blood to discover their type.
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Old 07-26-2022, 08:26 AM
 
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Perhaps it isn't *necessary* but as someone who has to receive periodic blood transfusions, it is certainly reassuring to know my blood type. With every unit of blood delivered the staff have to go through a process of repeating codes and terms to each other, to make sure that the blood is the right kind of blood. During that process they will also state the blood type and it has certainly been reassuring to me to hear them say "O+".

It's true that in an emergency, the hospital will use O-, the universal donor. But O- is also one of the rarest blood types (less than 5% of the population has it) so really they will use the least amount possible until they can test your blood and determine your type, and then switch to that. Conversely, while O+ is not a universal donor, it is pretty valuable to blood banks because it is the most common blood type. If you are in need of blood, there's a nearly 50% chance that you need O+. So again, while it may not be *necessary* to know your blood type, it could be important to know how valuable your blood is to the blood banks.

As someone who is unable to donate (I never have enough to give away), thanks to all who do.
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Old 07-26-2022, 08:27 AM
Status: "RIP Queen Elizabeth" (set 5 hours ago)
 
Location: state of confusion
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I went to our hospital and paid I think $18-20 for a blood test to find out mine.
I walked in one day told the woman at the desk I'd like to know my blood type and
stopped in the next day went to their lab. Easy. A+.
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Old 07-26-2022, 09:48 AM
 
804 posts, read 454,830 times
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Originally Posted by MarianRavenwood View Post
Perhaps it isn't *necessary* but as someone who has to receive periodic blood transfusions, it is certainly reassuring to know my blood type. With every unit of blood delivered the staff have to go through a process of repeating codes and terms to each other, to make sure that the blood is the right kind of blood. During that process they will also state the blood type and it has certainly been reassuring to me to hear them say "O+".

It's true that in an emergency, the hospital will use O-, the universal donor. But O- is also one of the rarest blood types (less than 5% of the population has it) so really they will use the least amount possible until they can test your blood and determine your type, and then switch to that. Conversely, while O+ is not a universal donor, it is pretty valuable to blood banks because it is the most common blood type. If you are in need of blood, there's a nearly 50% chance that you need O+. So again, while it may not be *necessary* to know your blood type, it could be important to know how valuable your blood is to the blood banks.

As someone who is unable to donate (I never have enough to give away), thanks to all who do.
Each place can be slightly different. It depends on how comfortable the medical staff are with clinical studies conducted for trauma scenarios. There have been clinical studies done where type O positive red blood cells have been used for all trauma patients with the exception of young females under 50 years of age who get type O negative blood. The shortage of O-negative blood necessitated such studies to see if that protocol was workable or not. The studies based on the numbers turned out to be viable.

Some trauma units have their own refrigerator that is overseen by the hospital blood bank. This special small blood bank refrigerator has a computer interface that in order to open it the nurse has to scan their ID badge to gain access which then asks for the patient's medical record number and then asks if the patient is a male or female and tells them to get O positive or O negative based on programmed criteria. They then scan the unit itself. At the blood bank a computer alarm blinks red indicating blood was issued to a patient and the type of unit that was issued. This allows us to replenish the units.

The protocol for massive transfusion also requires plasma to be given paired with the red blood cells and so we stock type A plasma along with red blood cells again this blood type is preferred over type AB plasma based on validated studies.

Once we get a blood type then we start giving type-specific blood products and move on. If a male were to type Rh negative then we would continue to give O positive blood if a shortage of Rh negative blood exists in our inventory.

We have had to adapt to shortages of blood types in order to save lives. People who are Rh negative can receive Rh positive blood for several days until they develop antibodies in which case they can no longer receive Rh positive blood. We can also convert a person's blood type say from AB positive to A positive by giving massive blood products and then giving the corresponding plasma type such as type A plasma rather than the rare AB plasma. We reserve Rh negative blood for women of childbearing age in order to prevent hemolytic disease of the newborn.

I also want to thank everyone for donating blood. It gets very stressful when we have to pick and choose who gets blood during shortages. We don't take it lightly.
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