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Old 07-25-2022, 05:01 AM
 
Location: Seymour TN
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I had surgery in January and obviously they had to know my blood type, so how can I find out what it is? Anyone in the medical industry know which office I should call? I emailed my surgeon but she didn't reply, I could call their office or do I call the hospital - but who do I talk to at the hospital? Medical records? That is thru the hospital not the surgeon's office right? Thank you
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Old 07-25-2022, 05:24 AM
 
1,807 posts, read 988,701 times
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You can order a blood type testing kit on Amazon for 9.99 or so if you can't get a hold of anyone at the doctor's office.
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Old 07-25-2022, 05:55 AM
 
Location: In the Pearl of the Purchase, Ky
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I'd keep trying the surgeon's office. Or you might try the lab at the hospital, but I'd imagine they'd need your surgeon's OK to give out your info.
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Old 07-25-2022, 06:01 AM
 
Location: Outside US
3,078 posts, read 1,700,366 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Navyshow View Post
You can order a blood type testing kit on Amazon for 9.99 or so if you can't get a hold of anyone at the doctor's office.
I'm over 50 and don't know my blood type.

Thanks for info and the OP as well.
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Old 07-25-2022, 08:35 AM
 
7,582 posts, read 5,611,795 times
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I had surgery in 2020 and specifically asked the surgeon if I would be able to learn my blood type. He said yes, but even after getting my records to give to my new doctor, it wasn't on there.

I ended up donating blood and now I know. B+
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Old 07-25-2022, 09:25 AM
 
Location: Eastern Tennessee
3,829 posts, read 3,344,267 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kygman View Post
I'd keep trying the surgeon's office. Or you might try the lab at the hospital, but I'd imagine they'd need your surgeon's OK to give out your info.
No. Just go in person to Medical Records (they'll call it something different like health information). You may have to sign a waiver or request for records.
Your pcp should be able to provide that info over the phone for you.
It's as much yours as any other lab result and YOU own that information.
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Old 07-25-2022, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
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Unless the surgery entails significant risk of blood loss that might require transfusion, a blood type might not be ordered.
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Old 07-25-2022, 09:39 AM
 
770 posts, read 259,991 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJDevil View Post
I had surgery in January and obviously they had to know my blood type, so how can I find out what it is? Anyone in the medical industry know which office I should call? I emailed my surgeon but she didn't reply, I could call their office or do I call the hospital - but who do I talk to at the hospital? Medical records? That is thru the hospital not the surgeon's office right? Thank you
Were you in the military? If so, your blood type will likely be on your discharge papers.

Or you could try calling your primary-care doctor's office, and ask the nurse.
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Old 07-25-2022, 09:43 AM
 
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There's no reason why one should know their blood type generally. Every medical situation where that is important is done everytime such information is needed. We never just look at the medical record and or take a persons word for it. It always has to be performed again and again each and every time of use. One of the most preventable hospital deaths is an ABO blood type mismatch.

If you have never had a blood type on your medical record then it is common hospital practice to have your blood drawn not once but twice separately in order to confirm your blood type. We are very strict with the performance of the blood type as there are medical conditions that can change the blood type or interfere with an accurate blood type. Under these conditions we would give type O negative or O positive blood.

Not all surgeries will have blood type performed as a part of the crossmatch just in case blood is needed.

Children born to women who are type O or Rh negative will have their babies blood typed upon delivery to detect babies that might be susceptible to blood type mismatch hemolytic disease that can cause a baby to turn yellow. Women who become pregnant are also routinely blood typed during the start of their pregnancy.

Apart from that there is no reason to have a blood type done. We have come across discrepancies between what patients have stated as their blood types and our testing. The sensitivity of reagents that we have used has increased to the point where some weak Rh-positive patients who tested as Rh-negative in past are now showing up as Rh-positive. That is a problem that we had to address with the medical staff. Some of you out there who were labeled as Rh negative in the past are actually Rh positive.

Keep in mind that old technology involving phenotypic reactions involving antibodies and antisera is now outdated for certain situations when it comes to present-day DNA testing. We can determine through the use of genetic probes blood types. The old technology is much quicker but also more problematic in certain situations. If one replaces an entire blood volume in a patient then taking some of that blood for testing will reveal the blood given and not give you the original blood of the patient. DNA probes can bypass that dilemma.
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Old 07-25-2022, 11:02 AM
 
Location: Vermont
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I've known my blood type for fifty years or so, going back to whenever I started giving blood.

Still, if I were a doctor and I was getting ready to perform surgery, I would much rather test the patient's blood than take his/her word for it and risk harm to the patient.
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