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Old 08-10-2022, 08:13 AM
 
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Alzheimers and dementia are not the same thing.
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Old 08-10-2022, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Southern MN
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People with Alzheimer's have dementia but not all people with dementia have Alzheimer's.

Dementia is a syndrome - a group of symptoms of declining mental ability and could also be Parkinson's, Huntington's, stroke and various other diagnoses.
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Old 08-10-2022, 11:41 AM
 
Location: Southwestern, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Miss Hepburn View Post
(I know senior moments and dementia are way diff from full blown Alz...but it's all about our brains.)
I probably should have bolded this.
Cuz of time if anyone is interested in the B-12 thing ..."take with food".
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Old 08-10-2022, 02:40 PM
 
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Update: My mother went to the neurologist and he said she had pretty normal age-related cognitive impairment, not the beginnings of dementia. He had no suggestions for improving her situation, except perhaps more exercise.

But I am finding this pretty shocking. Her memory is really bad…. and this is normal for 87?

Remind me to die when I’m in my early 80s, lol.
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Old 08-10-2022, 06:27 PM
 
15,608 posts, read 10,642,720 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jill_Schramm View Post

When my mother sees a neurologist about her memory issues, the only thing that is 100% guaranteed is that her doctor in particular and the health care field in general will benefit. There is far far from a 100% guarantee that she personally will benefit.

Come on!!!!!!!!!


There are several types of dementia that there are treatments that prevent them from progressing


I was at breakfast this morning with a good friend whose mother just died at 95. She was diagnosed with dementia 8 years ago and given Donepezil at the time. From the time she started taking the med until she died, she never progressed and knew him, his sisters and family until the day she died


The worst day of my life was when my mother didn't know who I am. The same med did not work on her. BUT, it is always worth seeing the Doc.


No matter what, dementia is a miserable disease. Do everything possible to help the patient before it gets worse

Last edited by mike1003; 08-10-2022 at 06:37 PM..
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Old 08-11-2022, 04:03 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mike1003 View Post
Come on!!!!!!!!!


There are several types of dementia that there are treatments that prevent them from progressing


I was at breakfast this morning with a good friend whose mother just died at 95. She was diagnosed with dementia 8 years ago and given Donepezil at the time. From the time she started taking the med until she died, she never progressed and knew him, his sisters and family until the day she died


The worst day of my life was when my mother didn't know who I am. The same med did not work on her. BUT, it is always worth seeing the Doc.


No matter what, dementia is a miserable disease. Do everything possible to help the patient before it gets worse
Your friend didn’t progress for 8 years on Donepezil? Color me skeptical.

First, the course of dementia is highly individual and non-linear. There is no way of knowing that Donepezil was actually responsible for your friend’s mother’s supposed non-progression of her dementia. The only way to know for sure is to have your friend’s mother live twice —- and take Donepezil during one life and not take it during the other, which is of course impossible.

Second, diagnosing dementia is not an exact science. Maybe she didn’t have dementia in the first place?

Third, you say she “never progressed and knew him, his sisters …” I totally believe that she knew him and his sisters. I think your friend would be a good judge of that. But how does he know she “never progressed?” Never, at all? Hmmm. Seems like an exaggeration. Especially if she really did have dementia.

Fourth, Donepezil is not a disease-modifying drug. It only helps control symptoms. in studies, Donepezil has never been shown to have more than a short-term minimal to moderate effect on symptoms.

Fifth, Donepezil’s numbers needed to treat are 12. This means, according the studies I read (and that I may link later) that if 12 people take Donepezil, one of them will be helped by the drug. In the studies I looked at “helped” was defined quite minimally, like doing slightly better on some test taken in a controlled setting a few months in a row.

At the same time, its numbers needed to harm are 16. This means that for every 16 people on Donepezil, 1 was harmed by it. However, drug research being what it is (I.e. far from unbiased), “harm” was defined rather maximally as side effects so bad that treatment needed to be discontinued.

In conclusion, you make it sound like Donepezil is some miracle drug. But, no, it’s not.

Also, you say “it’s always worth seeing the doctor.” One thing I have noticed about your posts is that you love to make absolute, unqualified statements.

I can safely say that no, it is not always worth seeing a doctor. Not unless you want to spend literally your entire life in a doctors office. But now I recall that in a previous post, you said you would actually be willing to do that — spend your every waking moment in a doctor’s office — if that would prevent you from getting a certain disease. Well, not many people would agree with that.

Besides, the truth is that health care resources are not infinite. Is it really fair that someone with good insurance gets to see a doctor 3 times a week …. just to put their mind “at ease” (until the next day lol) while others without insurance have no access?

Finally, you don’t like my posts because they contain too msny words. Hope I didn’t just ruin your day.

P.S. As I wrote above, my mother did see the neurologist and he diagnosed her with age-related cognitive decline, not dementia. Not that that is going to make her any more functional in her life since neither condition has a cure or effective treatment.

Last edited by Jill_Schramm; 08-11-2022 at 04:23 AM..
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Old 08-11-2022, 04:15 AM
 
Location: interior Alaska
6,327 posts, read 4,865,595 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jill_Schramm View Post
Your friend didn’t progress for 8 years on Donepezil? Color me skeptical.

First, the course of dementia is highly individual and non-linear. There is no way of knowing that Donepezil was actually responsible for your friend’s mother’s supposed non-progression of her dementia. The only way to know for sure is to have your friend’s mother live twice —- and take Donepezil during one life and not take it during the other, which is of course impossible.

Second, diagnosing dementia is not an exact science. Maybe she didn’t have dementia in the first place?

Third, you say she “never progressed and knew him, his sisters …” I totally believe that she knew him and his sisters. I think your friend would be a good judge of that. But how does he know she “never progressed?” Never, at all? Hmmm. Seems like an exaggeration. Especially if she really did have dementia.

Fourth, Donepezil is not a disease-modifying drug. It only helps control symptoms. in studies, Donepezil has never been shown to have more than a short-term minimal to moderate effect on symptoms.

Fifth, Donepezil’s numbers needed to treat are 12. This means, according the studies I read (and that I may link later) that if 12 people take Donepezil, one of them will be helped by the drug. In the studies I looked at “helped” was defined quite minimally, like doing slightly better on some test taken in a controlled setting a few months in a row.

At the same time, its numbers needed to harm are 16. This means that for every 16 people on Donepezil, 1 was harmed by it. However, drug research being what it is (I.e. far from unbiased), “harm” was defined rather maximally as side effects so bad that treatment needed to be discontinued.

In conclusion, you make it sound like Donepezil is some miracle drug. But, no, it’s not.
This is why this thread is pointless. If someone gives an example of a helpful intervention, you'll just come up with reasons to disbelieve them. You can always negate any case of a successful intervention by saying "well, probably they didn't have dementia in the first place." It's a magic bullet against becoming better informed.
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Old 08-11-2022, 05:34 AM
 
2,242 posts, read 1,016,449 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frostnip View Post
This is why this thread is pointless. If someone gives an example of a helpful intervention, you'll just come up with reasons to disbelieve them. You can always negate any case of a successful intervention by saying "well, probably they didn't have dementia in the first place." It's a magic bullet against becoming better informed.
I am sorry. Someone just offered a single (not entirely believable) anecdote about Donepezil. I responded by thinking and referring to actual studies. That’s not just coming up with an excuse to dismiss them. That’s called having a good argument.


About maybe not having dementia in the first place, it’s a very valid question particularly when there is no cut-and-dried diagnostic test. In fact, I was just looking at an article about how there is most likely an overlapping gray area in the elderly between age-related cognitive decline and mild dementia.

Just because a lot of people say something (or lots of different things), that doesn’t make them right.

Also, is there some law somewhere that when someone starts a thread they have to agree with the answers. I think not.

Last edited by Jill_Schramm; 08-11-2022 at 05:44 AM..
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Old 08-11-2022, 07:00 AM
 
Location: Early America
2,954 posts, read 1,692,871 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jill_Schramm View Post
Update: My mother went to the neurologist and he said she had pretty normal age-related cognitive impairment, not the beginnings of dementia. He had no suggestions for improving her situation, except perhaps more exercise.

But I am finding this pretty shocking. Her memory is really bad…. and this is normal for 87?

Remind me to die when I’m in my early 80s, lol.
He should have discussed nutrition as well, but many don't.

The medical wild goose chase you were worried about didn't happen so that is a good thing, yes?
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Old 08-11-2022, 07:50 AM
 
630 posts, read 373,275 times
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Do you have any siblings who want to help your mom? That might be a good solution.
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