U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Health and Wellness
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-26-2022, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
6,436 posts, read 11,546,525 times
Reputation: 13735

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by LongevitySeeker View Post
You're right because you're looking at it from the perspective of an overall, healthy, nutritious diet.

But the study itself was led by Lynn L. Moore, associate professor of medicine.

All the more reason for the study to have a narrow reductionist perspective, as I mentioned in my post above.
Well, yes, keeping your electrolytes in balance does much to create good health.

I wonder how many of us would not have high blood pressure if our sodium/magnesium/potassium levels where were they should be?

Some Docs, such as Dean Ornish, Cardiologist, have lowered blood pressure to normal and eliminated heart disease with a whole food vegetable-heavy diet. Low in fat, too. And restricted salt. The vegetable-centered eating program restores the balance of the three minerals.

I've not heard of any Doc or study that's done the same with a sodium-heavy diet...
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-27-2022, 01:35 PM
 
773 posts, read 260,671 times
Reputation: 714
Quote:
Originally Posted by LittleDolphin View Post
Well, yes, keeping your electrolytes in balance does much to create good health.

I wonder how many of us would not have high blood pressure if our sodium/magnesium/potassium levels where were they should be?

Some Docs, such as Dean Ornish, Cardiologist, have lowered blood pressure to normal and eliminated heart disease with a whole food vegetable-heavy diet. Low in fat, too. And restricted salt. The vegetable-centered eating program restores the balance of the three minerals.

I've not heard of any Doc or study that's done the same with a sodium-heavy diet...
Yes, I have The Spectrum by Doctor Dean Ornish, and a couple other of his books. He's probably more well known over in the west coast area because of his clinics, if he still has them.

Some months ago I bought a brand of salt called Real Salt in a health food store. It's unprocessed with no additives and has about 30 trace minerals. My intention was to use very little but somehow, without realizing it, I began to use more than I should. My blood pressure a few years ago used to be about 100/50 or slightly more. But after using more salt, when I checked it at home, my reading was around 118/68 which I didn't like.

After reading this thread yesterday and reviewing couple of pH books and others, I decided I don't really need to be using salt. Yesterday I only used very little on my oatmeal for breakfast, then for lunch and dinner I didn't use any at all. Then in the evening around 8PM I took my blood pressure and it was 103/53. So I was quite pleased with that.

I have a good book by John P. Cooke and Judith Zimmer, "The Cardiovascular Cure:..." And in this book he states there's no such thing as blood pressure being too low, as long as you don't get dizzy.

I also have a couple of books on pH balance and was reminded that we need sodium but it should come from natural whole foods. They say highly processed salt from the salt-shaker is all wrong for us and is counter productive. One book recommended the brand of salt that I already have plus some other non-processed salts. I suppose it could come in handy if I happen to be doing some yard work on a hot humid day and lose some salt by perspiring.

Because I only eat plant foods like fresh fruit, vegetables, whole grains, legumes and so on, I certainly don't need more potassium by consuming salt. And my diet also contains more than enough magnesium.

Another book pertaining to vitamins and minerals mentioned a study that showed high salt intakes increase calcium excretion and raises the risk for osteoporosis.

https://www.google.com/search?q=High...High+salt+diet

I don't remember that being mentioned in the opening post-link of this thread. We already have too much osteoporosis as it is, so that should be a major concern, especially for seniors who have been known to fall down a lot.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Health and Wellness
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2022, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top