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Old 08-17-2022, 06:56 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
1,252 posts, read 1,113,484 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScoPro View Post
My 29 year old grandson died unexpectedly six weeks ago from a brain aneurysm.

ScoPro, I am so, so sorry to read this. My sincere condolences. How awful for you and your family.
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Old 08-17-2022, 07:11 AM
 
Location: Upstate
8,162 posts, read 8,384,250 times
Reputation: 7248
So if the screening comes back positive, is surgery the only option?
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Old 08-17-2022, 08:04 AM
 
Location: South Florida
925 posts, read 1,530,490 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marcopolo View Post
Friends, I'm wondering if I should be screened for aortic aneurysm, and I am trying to assess the benefits and risks of such a procedure. A doctor has made a tepid recommendation for it. Can you help?

I have no symptoms, wonderful lab test results, healthy diet and exercise and sleep habits. I fear frailty and incapacity more than death.

What are the odds of a false positive from the screening?
What is the mortality rate for elective abdominal aneurysm repair?
What is the rate of significant non-fatal complications for elective abdominal aneurysm repair?
What is the rate of hospital-acquired infections for surgery patients?
What is the rate of incidence of abdominal aneurysm crises in unscreened healthy people?

Male, into retirement years. Thanks in advance.

This is a painless, non-invasive, inexpensive screening. If it is normal, you don't have to do it again. If it's enlarged and life-threatening, why wouldn't you want to get it repaired while you can choose the best doctor and method for that procedure, get second opinions, choose a good hospital, and arrange for aftercare? Most importantly, the outcome of any surgery is likely to be better on a non-emergency basis. It seems to me it would be a lot easier to repair a still intact abdominal aorta in a healthy patient than one that has shredded with the patient already near death.
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Old 08-17-2022, 08:18 AM
 
Location: East Texas, with the Clan of the Cave Bear
2,882 posts, read 5,108,771 times
Reputation: 3948
Quote:
Originally Posted by USNRET04 View Post
So if the screening comes back positive, is surgery the only option?

No.

Intravascular access under fluoroscopy is a major player nowadays with stents, mesh placement, coiling, etc. There are many techniques but the key is the less invasiveness achieved with endovascular methods.

Good article with layman explanations of major artery repair in the thoracic and abdominal compartments.

https://wexnermedical.osu.edu/heart-...neurysm-repair

The same basics with brain aneurysm:


https://www.uofmhealth.org/condition...brain-aneurysm

risk factors for brain aneurysm:

https://www.bafound.org/about-brain-...xoC9ikQAvD_BwE
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Old 08-17-2022, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Washington state
5,972 posts, read 3,874,225 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BobTex View Post
Basilar tip . . . impressive! You are a blessed man !

I'd like to clarify some things. The abdominal, carotid, and intracerebral aneurysms are 3 different critters with intracranial being the hardest to treat but is much easier in the last 15 years or so with interventional neuroradiology techniques such as coiling and stent placement. This is minimally invasive compared to the open craniotomies and aneurysm clippings when I first started.

Aneurysms can be on ANY artery in the body. Some places are just more sensitive than others.

Modern medicine is a wonderful and even mysterious thing where the skill of the practitioner is on display. I marveled at some of the skills of the surgeons I worked with over the years.
I'm a she, actually.

They used coiling originally on my aneurysm but that was leaking blood 8 months later. So then they went in and did a stent. I haven't had any problems since then.

I think it was the head of the neurology department that did my surgeries. I'd say I definitely owe my life to him.
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