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Old 02-26-2024, 06:37 PM
 
22,174 posts, read 19,217,049 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghaati View Post
So you proved yourself wrong. You "learned" that dental health is connected to gut health. And yet, you were able to improve your dental health to 95% "great"ness, but your gut health still suffers.

Therefore, there is no connection between gut health and dental health. If there were, you wouldn't have had such rousing success with your teeth. Your gums would be bleeding, your jawbone would be disintegrating, you'd be suffering from abscesses, you'd be experiencing sinus pain (sinuses are right at the edge of your upper mouth ridge), even if you had no teeth at all.

There is a CORRELATION between digestive system illness and dental health. There is no causation, unless you're vomiting regularly or suffering from rickets. Both of those have a -direct- effect on the teeth.
Except YES there IS a connection between gut health and dental health.

"With gum disease, also known as periodontitis or gingivitis, people experience inflammation and an infection in our gums," explains Whitney DiFoggio, RDH, a Chicago-based registered dental hygienist. "This gum-disease bacteria can travel to our gut and affect the balance of bacteria there."

Research backs this up: Bacteria in our mouths have been proven to have the potential to travel to our stomach and intestines, per a study published in March 2019 in the Journal of Oral Microbiology.
"Inflammation can lead to bloating, gas and diarrhea," says Kenneth Brown, M.D., a gastroenterologist in Plano, Texas, and the host of the Gut Check Project podcast. "Poor dental health can lead to tooth decay and gum disease. These conditions can cause chronic inflammation in the mouth, leading to inflammation throughout the body."
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Old 02-26-2024, 06:40 PM
 
22,174 posts, read 19,217,049 times
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Update: i am now 100% off caffeine, this is day 3.
Interesting to note: Skin has improved since being off of caffeine. No more skin breaking out on my face. A bonus.
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Old 02-26-2024, 06:48 PM
 
22,174 posts, read 19,217,049 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steiconi View Post
I understand that nutritional yeast has been heated to kill the yeast microbes, so it's not a probiotic. Maybe it is minerals or vitamins in it that help.
I've got some on hand and like the flavor, I think I'll try using it more. Have to get out the scale to figure out dosage in teaspoons.

I'm having similar gut issues, and have been doing the low-FODMAP elimination diet. That cuts out most foods that have components that commonly cause gut issues, including gluten, dairy, artificial sweeteners, and many fruits and veggies.

It worked when I first did it several months ago, but I've done backslid and have just started again.
i have been reading a lot on the low FODMAP foods. And have a sense of what i can easily eliminate right away, and some alternatives for things that would be harder for me to give up. For instance garlic is a no-no (i love garlic and use it lots and lots). However I can still roast garlic in oil or fake butter, and just remove the garlic pieces. It is fascinating. I typically mince garlic and roast it anyway in fake butter, and i can still do that, just take out the minced pieces before eating. That's what i like to toss my roasted potato chunks in for eating.

Also what to buy to add more of to my food plan. For starters, frozen spinach and flax seed, and a grinder to ground up the flax seed before using it.

The first day I ate the nutritional yeast there was nausea but the few days after that, it felt fine and tummy feels calmer. The trial and error aspect of this is appealing. It really is trying to see what works and doesn't.
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Old 02-26-2024, 07:21 PM
 
Location: Middle of the valley
48,521 posts, read 34,843,322 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tzaphkiel View Post
Except YES there IS a connection between gut health and dental health.

"With gum disease, also known as periodontitis or gingivitis, people experience inflammation and an infection in our gums," explains Whitney DiFoggio, RDH, a Chicago-based registered dental hygienist. "This gum-disease bacteria can travel to our gut and affect the balance of bacteria there."

Research backs this up: Bacteria in our mouths have been proven to have the potential to travel to our stomach and intestines, per a study published in March 2019 in the Journal of Oral Microbiology.
"Inflammation can lead to bloating, gas and diarrhea," says Kenneth Brown, M.D., a gastroenterologist in Plano, Texas, and the host of the Gut Check Project podcast. "Poor dental health can lead to tooth decay and gum disease. These conditions can cause chronic inflammation in the mouth, leading to inflammation throughout the body."
Please don't forget that a bunch of these studies are subsequently disproven, or found to be of poor quality. Tons of poor studies are submitted every day.

That, plus the inclusion of words like "potential" are there because the study didn't prove it does prove a connection, just that it looks like it may... and study should be done to prove/disprove that.

Also, a quote from a Dental Hygienist doesn't carry a lot of weight.

Does the gut not being healthy cause troubles with gums and teeth? Or the opposite? Or neither? Or both?


But the health of our body is always a good thing to strive for, and for gut health, fiber would be then hands-down winner towards that goal. But people don't want to eat a bunch of beans, they would rather take a supplement or pill.
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Old 02-26-2024, 10:10 PM
 
22,174 posts, read 19,217,049 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikala43 View Post
Please don't forget that a bunch of these studies are subsequently disproven, or found to be of poor quality. Tons of poor studies are submitted every day. That, plus the inclusion of words like "potential" are there because the study didn't prove it does prove a connection, just that it looks like it may... and study should be done to prove/disprove that.

Also, a quote from a Dental Hygienist doesn't carry a lot of weight. Does the gut not being healthy cause troubles with gums and teeth? Or the opposite? Or neither? Or both? But the health of our body is always a good thing to strive for, and for gut health, fiber would be then hands-down winner towards that goal. But people don't want to eat a bunch of beans, they would rather take a supplement or pill.
they are related.
and my preference is to yes eat the foods, not take pills.
(and then i had a hearty chuckle seeing "ibuprofen" listed in your user tag . ) My goal is to be as pill-free as possible and as medication-free as possible for as many years as I can. To that end I am willing to spend a great deal of time and energy and experimentation in trying different things to facilitate that.

the study quoted in earlier post is an example, it is just one of many. People can research on their own further if they are interested in the topic or feel it may be beneficial or relevant to their own health. That's why it is so helpful for me to hear from others who share what they have found works or doesn't work in their own experience.
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Old 02-26-2024, 11:23 PM
 
22,174 posts, read 19,217,049 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikala43 View Post
Please don't forget that a bunch of these studies are subsequently disproven, or found to be of poor quality. Tons of poor studies are submitted every day.

That, plus the inclusion of words like "potential" are there because the study didn't prove it does prove a connection, just that it looks like it may... and study should be done to prove/disprove that.

Also, a quote from a Dental Hygienist doesn't carry a lot of weight.

Does the gut not being healthy cause troubles with gums and teeth? Or the opposite? Or neither? Or both?


But the health of our body is always a good thing to strive for, and for gut health, fiber would be then hands-down winner towards that goal. But people don't want to eat a bunch of beans, they would rather take a supplement or pill.
And nutritional yeast is an excellent source of fiber.
WebMD: "Digestive Issues-Nutritional yeast is an excellent source of fiber."
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Old 02-27-2024, 06:04 AM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
24,118 posts, read 32,468,260 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tzaphkiel View Post
Except YES there IS a connection between gut health and dental health.

"With gum disease, also known as periodontitis or gingivitis, people experience inflammation and an infection in our gums," explains Whitney DiFoggio, RDH, a Chicago-based registered dental hygienist. "This gum-disease bacteria can travel to our gut and affect the balance of bacteria there."

Research backs this up: Bacteria in our mouths have been proven to have the potential to travel to our stomach and intestines, per a study published in March 2019 in the Journal of Oral Microbiology.
"Inflammation can lead to bloating, gas and diarrhea," says Kenneth Brown, M.D., a gastroenterologist in Plano, Texas, and the host of the Gut Check Project podcast. "Poor dental health can lead to tooth decay and gum disease. These conditions can cause chronic inflammation in the mouth, leading to inflammation throughout the body."
True. Dental health affects our entire body and every system with in it. The cardiovascular system, for example, is adversely affected by poor oral hygiene. And at first look, they do not seem physically connected - although they are physiologically.

When food passes through the mouth into the gastrointestinal track, why should it NOT have an effect on gut health? The food must pass either through a healthy mouth, or a mouth full of rotting teeth and infected gums.

Chronic inflammation in known to have a deleterious effect on every bodily system.
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Old 02-27-2024, 08:24 AM
 
Location: Early America
3,124 posts, read 2,068,179 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tzaphkiel View Post
My goal is to be as pill-free as possible and as medication-free as possible for as many years as I can.
Same here. It's been working for me for years. No pills, no more pain, no surgeries so far (knock wood) at age 70.

Quote:
To that end I am willing to spend a great deal of time and energy and experimentation in trying different things to facilitate that.
Hang in there. It will become second nature to you once you get it worked out. Very easy.

Quote:
That's why it is so helpful for me to hear from others who share what they have found works or doesn't work in their own experience.
I got rid of all fake foods/highly processed foods. Fake butters are typically made with seed/"vegetable" oils. Try olive oil instead of fake butter. I don't use nutritional yeast. Most are fortified with synthetic vitamins which are poorly absorbed. I go for whole foods, the natural sources of nutrients.

An irregular bowel movement pattern and food intolerances can be signs of gut dysbiosis - or something else.

Probiotic products can ameliorate symptoms in certain diseases or conditions but they do not expand microbiota populations or increase overall microbiome diversity. Dietary fibers from real, whole foods expand microbiota populations and increase overall diversity. Most importantly, foods with inulin fiber in addition to other fibers; gut thrives on inulin fiber in particular. Garlic is one with inulin fiber so you are wise to keep it. I recommend including more inulin foods; you will also increase your nutrient intake. I did it with just whole foods---no probiotic pills/products or fermented foods required.
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Old 02-27-2024, 11:05 AM
 
4,948 posts, read 3,053,228 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tzaphkiel View Post
i'm curious to hear more what you find Sunbiz

My symptoms began one week after Thanksgiving, and I think it might be a fish oil supplement.
I've read up to 30% of those can be rancid, and I opened a new bottle right around that time; which doesn't smell right.
So if my issues clear up later in the week, I'll have those gelcaps tested.
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Old 02-27-2024, 03:24 PM
 
Location: The Bubble, Florida
3,437 posts, read 2,407,005 times
Reputation: 10063
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tzaphkiel View Post
Except YES there IS a connection between gut health and dental health.

"With gum disease, also known as periodontitis or gingivitis, people experience inflammation and an infection in our gums," explains Whitney DiFoggio, RDH, a Chicago-based registered dental hygienist. "This gum-disease bacteria can travel to our gut and affect the balance of bacteria there."

Research backs this up: Bacteria in our mouths have been proven to have the potential to travel to our stomach and intestines, per a study published in March 2019 in the Journal of Oral Microbiology.
"Inflammation can lead to bloating, gas and diarrhea," says Kenneth Brown, M.D., a gastroenterologist in Plano, Texas, and the host of the Gut Check Project podcast. "Poor dental health can lead to tooth decay and gum disease. These conditions can cause chronic inflammation in the mouth, leading to inflammation throughout the body."
I was responding to the notion that keeping your "gut health" in good shape, can prevent dental problems. Not the other way around. Dental problems can affect your entire body. Having a case of the runs or constipation, or even IBS, will not cause tooth decay, or bone loss in the mouth, or gum disease. UNLESS you are vomiting on a daily basis for a prolonged period of time - because the acid in vomit can strip enamel off the teeth. Patients living with chronic bulimia often have grey, brittle teeth as a result.
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