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Old 08-02-2022, 10:09 PM
 
26,549 posts, read 16,002,227 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cncracer View Post
I try to prevent the injuries I got as well as to keep my mind sharp. I am also one of those people who respond well to endorphins. One good run or and good long bike ride and I can be twice as productive the next few days. Studies show people who stay active greatly reduce the chance of dementia, and it is suppose to make your bones stronger, but I have real questions on that on this month. I think there is no question it is good for any person, I just wonder to what level. The net for people over 50 sure had low expectations on aerobic workouts. I hope that is a sliding scale based on how hyper the individual is LOL.
Military officers over the age of 50 have fitness expectations only slightly less than those of younger troops.

I'm in my late 60s, and I'm stronger and more muscular now than at any time in my past...and that's been gained in just the last three years. I wish I'd looked this beefy 40 years ago. It just took hard work and a lot more protein than I've ever eaten before.

My cardiovascular capability isn't as good as it was then, however. I was road cycling over 250 miles a week into my mid 50s. I really only stopped because of a fear of accident. I'm still spending a lot of time on an elliptical at home, and I can still keep my heartrate above 150 for over an hour, with wind sprints reaching 180 bpm. I used to do century rides on the road (five and a half hours) at 150 bpm, but I just can't bring myself to do over an hour on an elliptical indoors.
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Old 08-03-2022, 07:52 AM
Status: "Oct 16th = Global Fleshmonster Day" (set 28 days ago)
 
Location: Brawndo-Thirst-Mutilator-Nation
20,883 posts, read 21,701,781 times
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Probably train smarter, with an eye mainly toward maintaining decent strength, so you can function reasonably well until you croak.

Too much exercise is many times a negative.........too much bodily-stress and it can wear you
out mentally and physically.
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Old 08-06-2022, 05:34 AM
 
Location: Minnesota
1,123 posts, read 478,572 times
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When you find you are injuring yourself constantly, you are pushing too hard. Doesn't even have to be major injuries, but strains, sprains, pulled muscles, stress fractures count. If you are tired all the time you are probably pushing too hard. If you start dreading workouts that you used to love, you are pushing too hard.

I am fifty and still love to dance...ballet, modern dance mostly. I can still do splits, various turns, backbends (though I have low bone density and have been told to be careful). I supplement with lots of other exercise activities such as cycling, weight lifting, a lot of forms of calisthenics (recently fell in love with movement flow/functional movement exercise), swimming, walking. I average about 1.5 to 2 hours daily five or six days a week. But I go through periods when I am choreographing a dance where I am active much longer during a day (in between my 40-50 hour per week job) and I will start to feel those pesky shin splints returning, or I will get out of bed not feeling any energy at all in my body and I know I need to lay off or back off a little. I pushed too hard last year with swimming and ended up with shoulder impingement that is STILL not healed so I had to stop swimming for a long time and go through PT to get it more functional again.

It's very individual for each person. I have limitations and I know my body and my medical history and logically I know what I can handle and what not. But I get a lot of "should" thoughts in my head and start comparing myself to others my age more fit and it sends me on a spiral of pushing too hard and negative thought patterns followed by injuries. I don't have to prove a thing to anyone. I need to be healthy enough so I can keep working, supporting a disabled husband doing things like yardwork, mowing, shoveling, etc. I want to stay active and be stronger but I don't feel I need to make huge goals that are not attainable for me.
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Old 08-06-2022, 08:41 AM
 
775 posts, read 262,389 times
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Duplicate post.
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Old 08-06-2022, 08:47 AM
 
775 posts, read 262,389 times
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What do orthopedic surgeons say about running after total knee replacement?

The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS) doesn't recommend jogging or running after a total knee replacement.

https://www.google.com/search?q=What...client=gws-wiz
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Old 08-06-2022, 10:28 AM
 
2,293 posts, read 881,801 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cncracer View Post
Today while going through my week three trauma check-up my wife told me she suspected I was struggling with my age, and was trying to match my 20 and 40 year old self; which in part resulted in my bike injuries on labor day. I have always been active, and for most of my life been a long distance runner. Like most I had knee surgery this year, and have been told to stop running, something I did not want to do. I took up biking which has worked great till the accident, now I am told I seem to be headed to the age related crisis as I rapidly approach my sixth decade of life. In truth I am not overjoyed seeing the years tick by, but I don’t think I have dwelled on that uncontrollable factor of living, I am very competitive, more with my self than against others, and will push myself to the limits now just as I did at 20 or 40, but even with that I don’t come close to the past abilities in my youth, and I don’t think that really bothers me.
Having the age thing put directly to me after a major injury and the question I have asked myself this month really opened the issue in my head. At what age should we slow down? When I turn 60 is that a point to cut the 40 mile trails rides down and quit the 100 mile a week totals, is the world of running really gone after 55, is all this just fighting age, or an addiction to endorphins? Two major repairs tell me something needs a change, but how much and if I change doesn’t it just confirm I am getting too old?
i would talk to a cycling club etc for referrals to an orthopedist who really understands physical activity related to the specific sport. Usually those clubs know which MDs understand the demands of the sport. I dont think you are even close to being done. Your competitive drive is good for you body and mental health. Go find the right dr. Many have no clue about how different sports demand different physical abilities and what can be done, exercises, PT etc, to return the individual to their level of activity.
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Old 08-06-2022, 10:33 AM
 
2,293 posts, read 881,801 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cncracer View Post
Today while going through my week three trauma check-up my wife told me she suspected I was struggling with my age, and was trying to match my 20 and 40 year old self; which in part resulted in my bike injuries on labor day. I have always been active, and for most of my life been a long distance runner. Like most I had knee surgery this year, and have been told to stop running, something I did not want to do. I took up biking which has worked great till the accident, now I am told I seem to be headed to the age related crisis as I rapidly approach my sixth decade of life. In truth I am not overjoyed seeing the years tick by, but I don’t think I have dwelled on that uncontrollable factor of living, I am very competitive, more with my self than against others, and will push myself to the limits now just as I did at 20 or 40, but even with that I don’t come close to the past abilities in my youth, and I don’t think that really bothers me.
Having the age thing put directly to me after a major injury and the question I have asked myself this month really opened the issue in my head. At what age should we slow down? When I turn 60 is that a point to cut the 40 mile trails rides down and quit the 100 mile a week totals, is the world of running really gone after 55, is all this just fighting age, or an addiction to endorphins? Two major repairs tell me something needs a change, but how much and if I change doesn’t it just confirm I am getting too old?
there is an interesting thread in the exercise forum about how much exercise should you do in your 50s, 60s etc. you might find it helpful OP.
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