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Old 01-23-2010, 05:29 PM
 
Location: Not.here
2,828 posts, read 3,737,314 times
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This is welcoming news. Some municipalities are also looking at doing this with restaurants and public eating places.

Quote:
By ILAN BRAT And MAURICE TAMMAN

Amid rising government pressure and consumer concern, food makers are taking a new tack in their long-running effort to sell products with less salt. Instead of offering foods labeled as low salt that few people eat, they are gradually reducing the salt from some of their most popular items—and not making a big fuss about it on the label.


By next summer, ConAgra Food Inc.'s Chef Boyardee canned pasta will have decreased its sodium by about 35% over the course of five years without a word on the package. Campbell Soup Co.'s original flavor of V8 100% vegetable juice also silently dropped its sodium by 32% over eight years.


Food Makers Quietly Cut Back on Salt - WSJ.com
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Old 01-23-2010, 05:41 PM
 
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Customer education and demand also have something to do with this. 15 years ago I rarely read a label. Now it takes forever in the grocery because I read every label and search for county of origin on fresh produce. It is appauling to read the side of a can of soup and find it has 30% of a person's recommended daily sodium intake.

Maybe they will start becoming more truthful about glucamates too? naaaaa
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Old 01-23-2010, 06:06 PM
 
Location: Texas
14,076 posts, read 18,169,227 times
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Originally Posted by lifelongMOgal View Post
Customer education and demand also have something to do with this. 15 years ago I rarely read a label. Now it takes forever in the grocery because I read every label and search for county of origin on fresh produce. It is appauling to read the side of a can of soup and find it has 30% of a person's recommended daily sodium intake.

Maybe they will start becoming more truthful about glucamates too? naaaaa

I read the labels for country of origin too, but it doesn't have much to do with health. It has to do with supporting American growers and workers.

But, I never notice how much sodium or salt it has in it because I frankly don't care and can't imagine why anyone would. Salt is a savoring spice; it brings out every other flavor. We have to have salt to survive and just because the government or some "expert" thinks X amount of salt is too much, it doesn't mean diddly to me.

Why does it to anyone else? If y'all want to eat bland, tasteless food, knock yourselves out, but please leave my salt alone.
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Old 01-23-2010, 06:52 PM
 
Location: Not.here
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There are health conditions which will have your doctor place you on a restricted sodium (salt) diet. Some of the more common ones are high blood pressure, heart problems and kidney disease. But there are others.


One of the reasons why processed foods are loaded with salt is because salt helps retard spoiling and extends the shelf life. The funny thing about salt is that just as our taste buds have gotten used to higher and higher amounts, we can also get used to lower amounts. After a couple of weeks of gradually reducing salt, tasting something with the higher amount tastes too salty to me now. I used to buy juice that had over 700 mg of sodium and now get the one with 140 mg.
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Old 01-23-2010, 07:28 PM
 
Location: Texas
14,076 posts, read 18,169,227 times
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Originally Posted by nezlie View Post
There are health conditions which will have your doctor place you on a restricted sodium (salt) diet. Some of the more common ones are high blood pressure, heart problems and kidney disease. But there are others.


One of the reasons why processed foods are loaded with salt is because salt helps retard spoiling and extends the shelf life. The funny thing about salt is that just as our taste buds have gotten used to higher and higher amounts, we can also get used to lower amounts. After a couple of weeks of gradually reducing salt, tasting something with the higher amount tastes too salty to me now. I used to buy juice that had over 700 mg of sodium and now get the one with 140 mg.

My doctor TRIES to put me on a restricted diet, but I'm still a free citizen of a free country and don't feel particularly obligated to do what he says.

Enjoy life! It's too short not to!
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Old 01-24-2010, 06:57 AM
 
Location: Not.here
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Originally Posted by stillkit View Post
My doctor TRIES to put me on a restricted diet, but I'm still a free citizen of a free country and don't feel particularly obligated to do what he says.

Enjoy life! It's too short not to!

Saving our organs in the long run helps extend that enjoyment a little longer. Have you ever tried salt substitutes; they can help.
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Old 01-24-2010, 07:31 AM
 
Location: NE San Antonio
1,642 posts, read 3,644,838 times
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I think it's great, the American diet is overloaded with salt, and it's been overlooked for a long time. I can say canned pasta with 30% less salt will taste different, but the next generation will not know the difference. For those who choose not to care about salt intake, there's always the shaker.


If you are on a restricted sodium diet, or just wish to reduce your sodium, please check out the LOW SODIUM THREAD! in the DIET & WIEGHT LOSS FORUM for info, ideas and support. All welcome to post!
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Old 01-24-2010, 07:34 AM
 
Location: NE San Antonio
1,642 posts, read 3,644,838 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stillkit View Post
My doctor TRIES to put me on a restricted diet, but I'm still a free citizen of a free country and don't feel particularly obligated to do what he says.

Enjoy life! It's too short not to!
I say life is too short to shorten it further
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Old 01-24-2010, 07:40 AM
 
Location: NE San Antonio
1,642 posts, read 3,644,838 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lifelongMOgal View Post
Customer education and demand also have something to do with this. 15 years ago I rarely read a label. Now it takes forever in the grocery because I read every label and search for county of origin on fresh produce. It is appauling to read the side of a can of soup and find it has 30% of a person's recommended daily sodium intake.
Most canned soups actually have 50% or more of the RDA of sodium. And that's without adding a sandwich!
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Old 01-24-2010, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Texas
14,076 posts, read 18,169,227 times
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Originally Posted by nezlie View Post
Saving our organs in the long run helps extend that enjoyment a little longer. Have you ever tried salt substitutes; they can help.
So far as I know, most salt substitutes contain potassium chloride, which isn't any more healthy for most people than is salt itself. In that regard, they're no different that sugar substitutes and I, for one, prefer to use what's natural rather than what's concocted in a laboratory.

Besides that, I just like the taste of salt and always have. Sometimes, I'll just dump a big pile of it into my hand and eat it straight. Yum yum! Drives my doctor and family health-nuts crazy, but so far I'm healthier than they are.

As you may have surmised, I don't pay a whole lot of attention to what's supposed to be "good" for me and never have. Yet, here I am at 60 and the only health problem I have is a slightly elevated blood pressure and I'm not too concerned about that either.

The only things I avoid are processed, pre-cooked foods and anything man made when a natural product is available. I'm convinced that most of what causes our poor health is eating the wrong stuff and then trying to offset that by taking pills or using substitutes which are man-made.

At least that's worked for me so far and even if I drop dead right now, having made it to 60 ain't bad. In fact, it's good enough for me.
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