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Old 08-22-2010, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Parts Unknown, Northern California
48,565 posts, read 23,521,484 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tvdxer View Post
Warning: I was born in 1986, so anything before 1990-95 or so is based on my perceptions formed through what I've read or heard. Also, this reflects my experiences as a white Midwesterner. We all seem to have varying perspectives on "cultural decades", even those which we have lived through; this could be the effect of the filters of our own geographical and socioeconomic positions.

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It is admirable that you included the above perspective disclaimers before presenting your analyis, however, the one which you overlooked was that your perspective was going to me mostly a view through the eyes teenagers. I could not help but note that you tended to define eras exclusively by those things which were of interest to young people, and that this was at the expense of looking at the nation's status as a whole during the time periods you identifed.

There is some validity to your approach when dealing with the sixties since that era was mainly defined by a cultural war between generations and national attention was on youth. The boomers were in their teens and twenties during this time and they represented a larger percentage of the population than has been the normal balance between young and older.

After that, your justification for defining eras by rock music or attitudes of the young, becomes less solid.
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Old 08-22-2010, 02:20 PM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
7,652 posts, read 17,811,211 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grandstander View Post
It is admirable that you included the above perspective disclaimers before presenting your analyis, however, the one which you overlooked was that your perspective was going to me mostly a view through the eyes teenagers. I could not help but note that you tended to define eras exclusively by those things which were of interest to young people, and that this was at the expense of looking at the nation's status as a whole during the time periods you identifed.

There is some validity to your approach when dealing with the sixties since that era was mainly defined by a cultural war between generations and national attention was on youth. The boomers were in their teens and twenties during this time and they represented a larger percentage of the population than has been the normal balance between young and older.

After that, your justification for defining eras by rock music or attitudes of the young, becomes less solid.
Did you read my whole post? I included a lot that would affect older folks, or that defined the culture at the time of both youth and middle-aged people too.

But I do agree with you that I did have a slant towards youth. And really, I think it's justified. "Cultural decades" are really only periods of time in which the zeitgeist was continuously similar. In my view, the fashions of young people (under 35 years old) have more of an affect on the zeitgeist - both how it actually was and especially how we remember it - than the fashions of older age groups. This is especially true in light of the fact that musical tastes tend to become crystallized once a person reaches the age of 25 or 30. We remember the 1950's and early 1960's for American Bandstand, Buddy Holly, and Elvis - the musical preferences of the youth at that time. Likewise, we remember the 1980's as the era of glam rock and new wave (which only the youth really liked), not Buddy Holly or Elvis (which people who were than in their 40s still liked).
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Old 08-22-2010, 03:45 PM
 
13,505 posts, read 17,782,703 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tvdxer View Post
....In my view, the fashions of young people (under 35 years old) have more of an affect on the zeitgeist - both how it actually was and especially how we remember it .....
I am inclined to agree with this. I am presently age seventy-two and I have been quite amused and sometimes bemused by how these decades have been typified. And I think your remark may have put the finger on it.

Quote:
....- than the fashions of older age groups. This is especially true in light of the fact that musical tastes tend to become crystallized once a person reaches the age of 25 or 30.
I would agree with this, but with the caveat that it applies overwhelmingly to those working class and middle class folks who get married and whose lives become focused on child-rearing. Which, granted, is most people.

This may well account for the many radio stations with nostalgia formats.

I was thirty when the 70's era began, and none of the descriptions here, that I recall reading, reflect my musical experience of what the 70's was. And in large measure that is because the music referred to is what people younger than myself liked, whereas singles in their thirties were going to dance clubs and listening to music that never penetrated the youth market and wasn't aimed at it...for people like myself, at least in an urban environment, it was an entirely different world.

And ditto for the eras that followed. I found new, interesting and exciting music, but very little of it was what American twenty-somethings of those eras were listening too. The musical tastes of the younth market are essentially faddist and very parochial.

The Eighties for me were Hi NRG, but equally - and then more so - imported Brazilian music. The Nineties were Classic American jazz (arguably a kind of nostalgia, perhaps), still more Brazilian and a new infusion of Luso-African.

The people who shared these tastes were middle aged - but with few exceptions, single, single parents, or divorced with no responsibility for kids....people who clearly had much more time for pursuing things outside the married-with-kids orbit...though a few were married couples with economic means to still travel, etc.

Understandably, I presume, my musical 80's and 90's when I look back on them have close to zero in common with the musical memories of people who were young in those decades. While, on the other hand, I and the adults I knew best were not listening to nostalgia.

Then I emigrated from the U.S. in 2000, and since then American pop is something that accompanies MTV videos in the gym.
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Old 08-23-2010, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Cook County
5,289 posts, read 7,323,525 times
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40s- Harry Truman, Dorris Day, Red China, Johnnie Ray, South Pacific, Walter Winchell Joe Dimaggio

50s- Einstein, James Dean, Brooklyns got a winning team, Davy Crockey, Peter Pan, Elvis Presley Disney Land

60s- Pope Paul, Malcolm X, JFK blown away, what else do I have to say?

70s- Watergate, punk rock, Begin, Reagan, Palestine, terror on the airline, Ayatollolahs in Iran, Russians in Afghanistan

80s- Wheel of Fortune, Sally Ride, heavy metal, suicide, Foreign debts, homeless vets, AIDS, crack, Bernie Goetz.

That was all me.
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Old 08-24-2010, 03:02 AM
 
Location: Earth
17,441 posts, read 28,045,425 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Orangeish View Post
40s- Harry Truman, Dorris Day, Red China, Johnnie Ray, South Pacific, Walter Winchell Joe Dimaggio

50s- Einstein, James Dean, Brooklyns got a winning team, Davy Crockey, Peter Pan, Elvis Presley Disney Land

60s- Pope Paul, Malcolm X, JFK blown away, what else do I have to say?

70s- Watergate, punk rock, Begin, Reagan, Palestine, terror on the airline, Ayatollolahs in Iran, Russians in Afghanistan

80s- Wheel of Fortune, Sally Ride, heavy metal, suicide, Foreign debts, homeless vets, AIDS, crack, Bernie Goetz.

That was all me.
Just a couple minor quibbles about decades before I was born: wasn't Johnnie Ray most popular in the '50s not the '40s? (Sinatra would've been the major pop singer of the '40s, not Ray, although his stardom lasted far longer than Ray's). And Einstein was a major celebrity long before the '50s (he died in '56, had been regarded as the world's greatest physicist since the '20s, and was considered a great humanitarian and political activist as well as a great scientist).

The '80s was also marked by a fear that the US would be overtaken as a power by Japan - something many people forget about now, and which almost seems quaint - as well as the Cold War's final and one of its scariest acts. Kadafi was the major bad guy dictator of the '80s, in between Khomeini and Saddam, and now he's our "buddy".
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Old 08-24-2010, 06:16 AM
 
13,136 posts, read 40,123,413 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tvdxer View Post
Likewise, we remember the 1980's as the era of glam rock and new wave (which only the youth really liked), not Buddy Holly or Elvis (which people who were than in their 40s still liked).
Interesting that 80's stations are still doing well today and infact the number one rated FM station in New Mexico still is 94 ROCK out of Albuquerque and while they play all rock music starting from the 70's to current new release however their playlist and most requested music is a good percentage of 80's rock/glam.
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Old 08-24-2010, 09:18 AM
 
8,279 posts, read 11,626,272 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Orangeish View Post
40s- Harry Truman, Dorris Day, Red China, Johnnie Ray, South Pacific, Walter Winchell Joe Dimaggio

50s- Einstein, James Dean, Brooklyns got a winning team, Davy Crockey, Peter Pan, Elvis Presley Disney Land

60s- Pope Paul, Malcolm X, JFK blown away, what else do I have to say?

70s- Watergate, punk rock, Begin, Reagan, Palestine, terror on the airline, Ayatollolahs in Iran, Russians in Afghanistan

80s- Wheel of Fortune, Sally Ride, heavy metal, suicide, Foreign debts, homeless vets, AIDS, crack, Bernie Goetz.

That was all me.
Remember to thank Billy Joel for this..
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Old 08-24-2010, 10:32 AM
 
9,965 posts, read 17,174,361 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Orangeish View Post
40s- Harry Truman, Dorris Day, Red China, Johnnie Ray, South Pacific, Walter Winchell Joe Dimaggio

50s- Einstein, James Dean, Brooklyns got a winning team, Davy Crockey, Peter Pan, Elvis Presley Disney Land

60s- Pope Paul, Malcolm X, JFK blown away, what else do I have to say?

70s- Watergate, punk rock, Begin, Reagan, Palestine, terror on the airline, Ayatollolahs in Iran, Russians in Afghanistan

80s- Wheel of Fortune, Sally Ride, heavy metal, suicide, Foreign debts, homeless vets, AIDS, crack, Bernie Goetz.

That was all me.
You forgot the pivotal event of the 80s..

Rock and Roller Cola Wars---I can't take it any more.
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Old 08-24-2010, 11:51 AM
 
3,669 posts, read 6,758,246 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevxu View Post
I was thirty when the 70's era began, and none of the descriptions here, that I recall reading, reflect my musical experience of what the 70's was. And in large measure that is because the music referred to is what people younger than myself liked, whereas singles in their thirties were going to dance clubs and listening to music that never penetrated the youth market and wasn't aimed at it...for people like myself, at least in an urban environment, it was an entirely different world.
Your take on this topic was interesting. You mentioned Jazz and Hi-NRG for the 80's as your preferred genre in that decade but did not mention what you were listening to in the 70's, the music they played at dance clubs you visited, would you mind sharing more?
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Old 08-25-2010, 04:34 PM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
7,652 posts, read 17,811,211 times
Reputation: 6908
Quote:
Originally Posted by 6 Foot 3 View Post
Interesting that 80's stations are still doing well today and infact the number one rated FM station in New Mexico still is 94 ROCK out of Albuquerque and while they play all rock music starting from the 70's to current new release however their playlist and most requested music is a good percentage of 80's rock/glam.
I wonder what the age of their average listener is...
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