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Old 11-18-2015, 12:17 AM
 
447 posts, read 734,745 times
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They need a volume of books about the Red army like they printed about the US army. I have many of the volumes of books that are called "The US Army in WWII". The whole set is about 100 volumes as it has everything including books on the medical comand and the men and women who were out there doing the medic work. It even has a volume on chemical warfare of the US army. I have about 20 to 25 of the volumes as I have the European , Pacific and Meditteranean volumes. Just the one volume on the Battle of the Buldge is over 700 pages and the volumes go into so many small units and the fighting they did. Many times it covers fighting down to Platoons of 10 or less men. Its a very awesome set of books if you want to read on many of the smaller units details of the fighting. Every volume I have is atleast 400 pages and some over 700 pages as the biggest volume in my set is "Triumph in the Philippines" which is 756 pages. I can only imagine how many volumes they could have written about the Red army. Its very interesting to read about the smaller details in some battles. How sometimes just one tank destroyer got the right hit to stop an enemy column. Great reading. Even the volume about D-day spends about 250 to 300 pages on how the Allies came about to getting all the details of D-day done and ready by June the 6th. Ron
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Old 11-18-2015, 04:00 PM
 
2,806 posts, read 3,183,614 times
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Originally Posted by 383man View Post
They need a volume of books about the Red army like they printed about the US army. I have many of the volumes of books that are called "The US Army in WWII". The whole set is about 100 volumes as it has everything including books on the medical comand and the men and women who were out there doing the medic work. It even has a volume on chemical warfare of the US army. I have about 20 to 25 of the volumes as I have the European , Pacific and Meditteranean volumes. Just the one volume on the Battle of the Buldge is over 700 pages and the volumes go into so many small units and the fighting they did. Many times it covers fighting down to Platoons of 10 or less men. Its a very awesome set of books if you want to read on many of the smaller units details of the fighting. Every volume I have is atleast 400 pages and some over 700 pages as the biggest volume in my set is "Triumph in the Philippines" which is 756 pages. I can only imagine how many volumes they could have written about the Red army. Its very interesting to read about the smaller details in some battles. How sometimes just one tank destroyer got the right hit to stop an enemy column. Great reading. Even the volume about D-day spends about 250 to 300 pages on how the Allies came about to getting all the details of D-day done and ready by June the 6th. Ron
I read some of them too. Awesome. However i cannot imagine what was going through the writing staff's heads when they published the books around 1970 when the youth revolt against the Vietnam war was all the rage. Here you see the editors who most likely were WW2 vets themselves and obeying every order by their older superiors even at great cost and hardship to them while their own kids spat on returning Vietnam vets, or the Vietnam vets publicly throwing away their medals and decorations. It must have felt to them as if the world was coming to an end while they were publishing their own WW2 service to the most minute detail, just like they were obeying orders during the war.
The irony does not end there. While Vietnam vets were publicly scolded and hated at the time, they by and large are now admired as heroes by their own kids. That's exactly the opposite of what happened to the Greatest Generation WW2 vets.
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