U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > History
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 02-14-2011, 07:50 PM
 
Location: Sarasota, Florida
15,400 posts, read 20,296,486 times
Reputation: 11075

Advertisements

I've wanted to dedicate a thread to The Iowa Class Fast Battleships for a long time, so here goes.

Initially there were plans for 6 ships but only 4 were ever built. The keels were laid for the Illinois and Kentucky but they were never finished. The Iowa, Wisconsin, New Jersey and Missouri were finished and served our country admirably.

This class of battleships was the last of the great fighting ships. Battleships have basically been the most powerful Naval ships for centuries, in different configurations and until Aircraft Carriers came upon the world stage.

The Iowa Class has served the longest of any Naval fighting ships, transcending over 50 years and 4 wars: World War II, The Korean War, The Vietnam War and the First Gulf War.

They initially were outfitted to carry two aircraft but with their 1980's retrofit.....this was adapted by using helicopters and/or drone aircraft.

The original design was 57,000 tons(standard load) displacement. With a main armament of nine 16 inch guns capable of hurling a shell up to 24 miles. Firing Armor Piercing Shells of 2,700 pounds or High Explosive Shells of 1,900 pounds and/or 15 to 20 Kiloton Nuclear Tipped Projectiles.

The ships were decomissioned and reactivated numerous times. During the 1980's retrofit they were upgraded to counter the Soviet Union's Kirov Class Battle Cruisers. To be used as the centerpiece ships in 4 Battleship Battle Groups consisting of one Ticonderoga Class Cruiser, one Arleigh Burke Class Destroyer, one Spruance Class Destroyer and 3 Oliver Hazard-Perry Class Frigates, along with other support and supply ships.

During this upgrade The Iowas were armed with Harpoon Antiship Missiles, Tomahawk Long Range Land Attack Missiles, Phalanx Self Defense CIWS, new electronics, as well as new aircraft, along with other improvements.

The Japanese Empire surrendered on the USS Missouri, ending World War II and all four ships have been spared scrapping and are to be used as museums.

These four ships will live in our hearts and minds as they continue to serve our country in peace as well as they served during war. Long live the Iowas and their brave and valiant crews!

Iowa class battleship - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

USN Ship Types--Iowa class (BB-61 through 66)

IOWA CLASS BATTLESHIP STATS

Armament of the Iowa class battleship - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

600-ship Navy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Kirov class battlecruiser - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Ticonderoga class cruiser - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Arleigh Burke class destroyer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Spruance class destroyer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Oliver Hazard Perry class frigate - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Phalanx CIWS - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Tomahawk (missile) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Harpoon (missile) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Museum ship - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Keel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fygfFh8k2vU


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XFse6...eature=related


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w7H3cfZXoZE


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TTetKxtmI9c


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TY81Dp5ZTL8


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N3V7qb3ikW8
^^^^The music is kinda poor on this video!^^^^


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KgqigJpBVFA

THANKYOU for reading my thread!
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-14-2011, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Denver
1,788 posts, read 2,121,355 times
Reputation: 1057
Yep....they were definitely "manly man" type ships. Battleships were always my nostalgic favorite.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-14-2011, 09:21 PM
 
Location: New York City
2,789 posts, read 5,635,926 times
Reputation: 1839
Sentimentality aside, one has to admit that the upgrade of the Iowas was a waste of money.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-14-2011, 09:42 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,131 posts, read 28,195,006 times
Reputation: 6836
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrMarbles View Post
Sentimentality aside, one has to admit that the upgrade of the Iowas was a waste of money.
More of that good 'ol Republican fiscal conservatism.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-14-2011, 10:49 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, B.C., Canada
11,020 posts, read 24,428,491 times
Reputation: 5370
to be honest the battleship were great till japan brought in their aircraft carriers which changed the face of naval warfare after the attack on pearl harbour.

today a Nimitz class super carrier is the modren version of a Iowa Class main battleship either way past or present you don't mess with the U.S. Navy or marines unless you want to get you butt kicked

I have to admit those 16-inch main guns had pretty in your face don't mess around badass thing going for it.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-15-2011, 12:02 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,017 posts, read 18,722,705 times
Reputation: 32426
To Pittson2sarasota: Thank you for your interesting thread and the amount of trouble you obviously went to in gathering all the information. Several years ago I took the self-guided tour of the battleship USS Alabama at Mobile, Alabama. Can you tell me how much larger the Iowa class ships were? And also how much smaller were they than the two giant Japanese battleships, Musashi (sp.?) and Yamato, both sunk during World War II? The essentially suicide mission of the Yamato during the battle for Okinawa shows, I think, the level of desperation to which the Japanese were reduced at that stage of the war (April/May of 1945).
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-15-2011, 04:13 AM
 
Location: Texas
14,076 posts, read 18,480,850 times
Reputation: 7746
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
To Pittson2sarasota: Thank you for your interesting thread and the amount of trouble you obviously went to in gathering all the information. Several years ago I took the self-guided tour of the battleship USS Alabama at Mobile, Alabama. Can you tell me how much larger the Iowa class ships were? And also how much smaller were they than the two giant Japanese battleships, Musashi (sp.?) and Yamato, both sunk during World War II? The essentially suicide mission of the Yamato during the battle for Okinawa shows, I think, the level of desperation to which the Japanese were reduced at that stage of the war (April/May of 1945).

Since all 4 of the Iowa class ships survive, and you can tour 3 of them so far, you could travel to where they are and make a personal comparison.

The Missouri is berthed in Pearl Harbor.

The New Jersey is in the Delaware River, between Philadelphia and Camden, NJ.

The Wisconsin is in the Elizabeth River at Norfolk, VA.

The Iowa is still in the mothball fleet in Suisun Bay, CA, but there are plans to move her to Stockton, CA in the future. As you pass by the anchored fleet on I-680, you can spot her distinctive prow poking out from among a line of other ships.

As a side note, there are other battleships also in museum status, the most unique of which is the USS Texas, berthed at the San Jacinto Battlefield east of Houston, TX.

It is the last surviving Dreadnought style battleship anywhere in the world.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-15-2011, 09:31 AM
 
13,138 posts, read 37,715,830 times
Reputation: 12170
Quote:
Originally Posted by stillkit View Post
Since all 4 of the Iowa class ships survive, and you can tour 3 of them so far, you could travel to where they are and make a personal comparison.

The Missouri is berthed in Pearl Harbor.

The New Jersey is in the Delaware River, between Philadelphia and Camden, NJ.

The Wisconsin is in the Elizabeth River at Norfolk, VA.

The Iowa is still in the mothball fleet in Suisun Bay, CA, but there are plans to move her to Stockton, CA in the future. As you pass by the anchored fleet on I-680, you can spot her distinctive prow poking out from among a line of other ships.

As a side note, there are other battleships also in museum status, the most unique of which is the USS Texas, berthed at the San Jacinto Battlefield east of Houston, TX.

It is the last surviving Dreadnought style battleship anywhere in the world.
Thanks for the info about where they are located Stillkit ..... as i had forgotten about the Wisconsin up in downtown Norfolk as i really like to tour it if i can get up that way later on this year hopefully.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-15-2011, 11:07 AM
 
Location: Sarasota, Florida
15,400 posts, read 20,296,486 times
Reputation: 11075
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
To Pittson2sarasota: Thank you for your interesting thread and the amount of trouble you obviously went to in gathering all the information. Several years ago I took the self-guided tour of the battleship USS Alabama at Mobile, Alabama. Can you tell me how much larger the Iowa class ships were? And also how much smaller were they than the two giant Japanese battleships, Musashi (sp.?) and Yamato, both sunk during World War II? The essentially suicide mission of the Yamato during the battle for Okinawa shows, I think, the level of desperation to which the Japanese were reduced at that stage of the war (April/May of 1945).
You're welcome Naval ships and military weaponry are 2 of my favorite subjects and thankyou for the kind words.

I made an error on the IOWAs, the 57,000 ton displacement was the FULLY LOADED displacement NOT the standard displacement.

The Alabama was a South Dakota Class Fast Battleship and had 3 sister ships: South Dakota, Indiana and Massachusetts.

This class replaced the North Carolina Class Fast Battleships of which there were only two built: North Carolina and Washington.

The North Carolinas displaced about 46,000 tons fully loaded. While the South Dakotas displaced 45,000 tons with a full load.

The South Dakota Class was 680 feet long and had a beam of 108 feet with nine 16 inch guns.

The North Carolinas were 728 feet long and also had a beam of 108 feet; they too possessed nine 16 inch guns as their main offensive armament.

The Iowa Class was approximately 890 feet long and had the same beam width as the previous 2 classes of Fast Battleships.

Iowa class battleship - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Alabama_(BB-60)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_D...ttleship_(1939)

North Carolina-class battleship - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Montana Class Battleships were the next generation but were never built....they were to have twelve 16 inch guns and thicker armor etc....rivaling the Yamato Class Battleships of Japan.

Fully loaded they would have been 71,000 tons displacement with a length of 920 feet and a beam of 121 feet.

Montana class battleship - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Yamato Class Battleships were 72,000 tons fully loaded with a length of 862 feet and a beam of 127 feet. Five ships were planned and three completed. They possessed nine 18 inch guns capable of firing a 2,998 pound shell over 26 miles. These were the largest Naval guns ever fitted to a warship.

Yamato and Musashi were both sunk during the war; while the third(Shinano) was converted to an Aircraft Carrier and also sunk during the conflict.

Yamato class battleship - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Japanese battleship Yamato - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Japanese battleship Musashi - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Japanese aircraft carrier Shinano - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I hope this information was helpful and answered your questions adequately..
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-15-2011, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Denver
1,788 posts, read 2,121,355 times
Reputation: 1057
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
To Pittson2sarasota: Thank you for your interesting thread and the amount of trouble you obviously went to in gathering all the information. Several years ago I took the self-guided tour of the battleship USS Alabama at Mobile, Alabama. Can you tell me how much larger the Iowa class ships were? And also how much smaller were they than the two giant Japanese battleships, Musashi (sp.?) and Yamato, both sunk during World War II? The essentially suicide mission of the Yamato during the battle for Okinawa shows, I think, the level of desperation to which the Japanese were reduced at that stage of the war (April/May of 1945).
The Yamato didn't serve so admirably during the Battle of Leyte Gulf. The Japanese had overpowering numbers, largely aided by the uncomparable Yamato. My uncle served on the American destroyer who, captained by a Cherokee Indian, charged the Yamato. Now that was a suicide mission.

One giant shell from the Yamato essentially cut the American destroyer in half and it quickly sank. But the Yamato had already started bugging out of there before it was able to sink the destroyer.

I'm certain there were many factors that affected the decision to bug out but history credits the bold move of the destroyer with the ultimate move.

Half of the surviving crew of the destroyer were to meet their demise over the next three days. Leyte Gulf was the largest shark fest in recorded history. With all of the blood in the water, it was mostly a matter of time before a shark started tugging on exposed bodies.

The survivors met every year, I assume they continue to do so though attendance surely shrinks due to the eternal tug of time.

Yes....my uncle and the rest of the survivors were quite proud of their participation in the Battle of Leyte Gulf. I believe it was the largest naval battle of WWII. The Japs managed to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory. It was essentially the last time they matched up on a par.

Ensign Randy Brown was his name and he was one of my favorite uncles, he was the Best Man at my fathers wedding. The fires of war often produce the calmest of men.

Last edited by JohnHAdams; 02-15-2011 at 01:04 PM..
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > History
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top