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Old 09-14-2011, 01:30 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cav Scout wife View Post
That IS hypocricy.

The Christian Bible says not to be a man ho with any other woman but your wife, and he didn't "obey" that part of the book, so yes that is hypocricy.
This is not most people's understanding of Christianity. I am no expert, but I think it goes something like this: All have sinned. God, through Jesus, provides a way to be forgiven. Even the best true Christians fall short, and they never claim to be perfect. Rather, they are forgiven. Before we throw stones at Dr. King, let's see even one instance where he claimed that his own life was perfectly in conformance with Biblical teaching, or where he asserts that being a Christian requires being without sin.
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Old 09-14-2011, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn
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This just points up the fact that Jackie Kennedy, like the rest of us, was a human being. Not everyone admires everyone else. Plenty of people didn't think a whole lot of Abraham Lincoln during his lifetime, either.

In the case of Martin Luther King, his personal flaws didn't stand in the way of his ideals (and you can say precisely the same thing about President Kennedy!) It would be interesting to uncover some comment Jackie made later in life--to learn if she ever changed her views.
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Old 09-14-2011, 02:03 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Fred314X View Post
It would be interesting to uncover some comment Jackie made later in life--to learn if she ever changed her views.
She grew and evolved like everyone else. (I've read a great deal about her.)

I think we also need to remember she recorded these tapes shortly after her husband was killed. Killed while sitting right next to her. She fell into a period of immense grief. Obviously her thinking in the months following was affected by the horror she had lived through.
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Old 09-14-2011, 02:19 PM
 
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Who cares about what she thought about whatever?
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Old 09-14-2011, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
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I'm sure a lot of it was due to the influence of J. Edgar Hoover.
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Old 09-14-2011, 03:24 PM
 
Location: On the periphery
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If Jackie Kennedy's opinion of Martin Luther King relied soley on the reports of J. Edgar Hoover, it would be understandable that she was getting a highly biased view. It's well known that Hoover had a vendetta against Martin Luther King, not so much because of King's sexual peccadilloes, but because of King's opposition to the Vietnam War. King was very vocal in his denunciation of the wasteful expenditure of lives and resources.

To the shame of Attorney General Robert Kennedy, he gave Hoover permission in September 1963 to track King's every move. Hoover had hoped to prove that King had communist connections, but nothing was ever found to implicate King, despite intense efforts to do so. Hoover, who ran the FBI as his private fiefdom and reportedly had a file on just about everyone of note, also had a special contempt for Robert Kennedy.

It's highly probable that Jackie Kennedy's early views of King, as a deeply flawed person, were shaped by the reports given by Hoover. It would be hoped that her later opinions would have moderated, as it became more apparent that King was motivated by a desire for the betterment of the Black people.
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Old 09-15-2011, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn
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Originally Posted by diogenes2 View Post
It would be hoped that her later opinions would have moderated, as it became more apparent that King was motivated by a desire for the betterment of the Black people.
...Although of course when King himself spoke, he often referred to all people.
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Old 09-15-2011, 01:46 PM
 
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Four years after these tapes were made she met with Mrs. King before MLK's funeral. Here is what she told Mrs. King after signing the guest book in the King family home:

"Your husband was one of the greatest and most inspiring leaders that any of us has known. I share your grief in this hour of sorrow but his death will help free us from the violence and tragedy which hate often produces. He will always be remembered as one of our nation's martyred greats."

To anyone who wants to understand Mrs. Kennedy and learn more about the remarkable woman she was I would recommend the book "As We Remember Her - Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis in the words of her family and friends" by Carl Sferrazza Anthony.
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Old 09-15-2011, 06:16 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
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Originally Posted by DewDropInn View Post
Four years after these tapes were made she met with Mrs. King before MLK's funeral. Here is what she told Mrs. King after signing the guest book in the King family home:

"Your husband was one of the greatest and most inspiring leaders that any of us has known. I share your grief in this hour of sorrow but his death will help free us from the violence and tragedy which hate often produces. He will always be remembered as one of our nation's martyred greats."
Most public figures have things they say in public and somewhat less polite things they say amongst family and close friends. I think there was a bit more Alice Roosevelt in Jackie than is portrayed.
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Old 09-15-2011, 07:48 PM
 
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Originally Posted by CAVA1990 View Post
Most public figures have things they say in public and somewhat less polite things they say amongst family and close friends. I think there was a bit more Alice Roosevelt in Jackie than is portrayed.
I don't see her as Alice Roosevelt at all. More Eleanor without going down into the mines. Jackie was very influential behind the scenes. She was very interested in diplomacy and foreign policy.
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