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Old 01-21-2012, 10:41 AM
 
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The Greening of America - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Men suddenly stopped wearing hats in the 1960s. Look at old movies and see how all the men wore hats and suits everywhere, and women routinely wore white gloves when going out; and veiled hats to church. My uncle's hat store had to close down. And in 1960 the birth control pill came out -- at first, doctors would prescribe it only to married women.
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Old 01-21-2012, 12:44 PM
 
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Originally Posted by slowlane3 View Post
The Greening of America - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Men suddenly stopped wearing hats in the 1960s. Look at old movies and see how all the men wore hats and suits everywhere, and women routinely wore white gloves when going out; and veiled hats to church. My uncle's hat store had to close down. And in 1960 the birth control pill came out -- at first, doctors would prescribe it only to married women.
The hat industry BEGGED President Kennedy to wear hats. He thought he didn't look good in them so rarely wore one. Look at old photos of his innauguration. Most of them show him carrying his top hat. (Even Truman tried to kid him into wearing hats. It didn't work.)

He was as much a style setter for the early 60's as his wife. (Even if they couldn't afford the real thing men wanted a suit cut like a Brooks Brothers suit.)

Jackie wore her famous pill box hats and gloves when her husband was in office but once she stopped, so did most American women.
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Old 01-21-2012, 11:48 PM
 
Location: Cali
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The 60s is basically a three part decade. The early 60s(Kennedy years)is more or less still like the late 50s. Then there is the mid part, say 64 through 66 which was the Civil Rights struggle. The last years, 67 through 69 was protests against Vietnam which continued through 1972. Heck, you could even say the 60s was a 4 part decade being that the early 70s was politically and culturally still like that latter 60s.

Last edited by CamaroGuy; 01-22-2012 at 12:03 AM..
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Old 01-22-2012, 06:22 AM
 
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Originally Posted by CamaroGuy View Post
The 60s is basically a three part decade. The early 60s(Kennedy years)is more or less still like the late 50s. Then there is the mid part, say 64 through 66 which was the Civil Rights struggle. The last years, 67 through 69 was protests against Vietnam which continued through 1972. Heck, you could even say the 60s was a 4 part decade being that the early 70s was politically and culturally still like that latter 60s.
It felt to me that the early Sixties were much like the Fifties...though obviously our society was changing, if not at a startling rate. However, it did not seem to me that until circa '65 that these changes/influences had accumulated enough weight for me to begin to feel that we were definitely turning a corner.

I taught in a series of small colleges in the mid-Sixties - none of the biggies such as Columbia, Berkely, Univ. of Chicago, etc. These were in the Midwest, but it was apparent that even in these provincial, more conservative institutions many of my students were curious about the same ideas as those in the larger, more liberal universities.

It was an exciting time for me, because I felt the need to take a serious look at these same topics if I was going to be in touch with the students in my classes. Their interests were enough different at this point from those of student in the 50's when I was in university that I suddenly found myself loading up with books on new subjects, and engaging in informal discussions with student about them to the degree that it was something like getting a second college education.

I think it is ironical that though I was born in 1938, and went to high school and university in the 1950's, I feel that these "crash courses" I was giving myself in the mid-Sixties to keep up with the students seem to have played a greater role in shaping my thoughts and the direction of my life than my own formal education of the preceding decade.

Despite the age glitch, I would be inclined to think of myself as a "Child of the (later) Sixties," if it were not for the fact that that phrase seems to usually carry with it an automatic association with "Hippie."
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Old 03-06-2012, 05:17 PM
 
Location: Texas
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Some very good points have been made here.
I agree with what has been said, regarding the 60s being, a two part decade. 1960-63, was very much like the 1950s, or before.

During the early 60s, Television was in its golden age. Shows like Leave it to Beaver and Dennis the Menace, were still popular, and considered relevant to the times. Lighthearted comedies, featuring Doris Day were the attraction at the drive in theatre. Television at the time was wholesome, good clean comedy that reflected the optimism of America’s post- war era.

By 1964, everything had changed. New shows, such as the Munster’s, or the Adams family, replaced the “Leave it to Beaver type” shows that had been popular up until the end of the previous year.

As the 60s progressed, Television became less of an enjoyable escape from the tumultuous times, as the nature of the programs shown, began to reflect the upheaval of the day. Gone were the upbeat, cheerful, comedies that had defined both Television and the optimism of a new decade, just a few years before.
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Old 03-07-2012, 06:46 PM
 
Location: Northridge/Porter Ranch, Calif.
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Originally Posted by Jay Watson View Post
Some very good points have been made here.
I agree with what has been said, regarding the 60s being, a two part decade. 1960-63, was very much like the 1950s, or before.

During the early 60s, Television was in its golden age. Shows like Leave it to Beaver and Dennis the Menace, were still popular, and considered relevant to the times. Lighthearted comedies, featuring Doris Day were the attraction at the drive in theatre. Television at the time was wholesome, good clean comedy that reflected the optimism of America’s post- war era.

By 1964, everything had changed. New shows, such as the Munster’s, or the Adams family, replaced the “Leave it to Beaver type” shows that had been popular up until the end of the previous year.

As the 60s progressed, Television became less of an enjoyable escape from the tumultuous times, as the nature of the programs shown, began to reflect the upheaval of the day. Gone were the upbeat, cheerful, comedies that had defined both Television and the optimism of a new decade, just a few years before.
Also Westerns. Westerns were very popular in the early-'60s. And even the mid-'60s. "Bonanza" was the #1 TV show for 3 years in the mid-'60s.
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Old 03-07-2012, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Grove City, Ohio
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Originally Posted by Nighteyes View Post
Having read thru this, and considering my personal knowledge/experiences, perhaps we should speak of the time from 1939 thru about 1980 as being "the most changeful period" in history.

Whaddaya think?
I can't agree with you at all.

I would award "the most changeful period" to end of the 1340's and specifically to the four year period between October, 1347 and the end of 1351.

The Black Death: Bubonic Plague

Consider the effects of the change in population:

In 1347 the estimated population of Europe was 75 million and just four years later it had declined to an estimated 50 million.

Imagine America today with a population of 313 million if a disease came along that would kill 103 million Americans in less than four years. Think not just of social life but what something like this would do the economy.

And not just the world, imagine if a disease came along that would kill a full third of mankind in less than four years. What do you suppose would happen to China's economy if they lost 444 million people out of their population of 1.347 billion?

Food and oil production?

When it comes to devastation I worry more about an airborne Ebola-Zaire virus, mortality rate of 88%, than a nuclear bomb. Lucky for us the Ebola Virus is not airborne.... yet.

But back to the plague of 1347 there came about changes that have affected us as well in that it shaped our lives to this very day.

Quote:
Medieval society never recovered from the results of the plague. So many people had died that there were serious labor shortages all over Europe. This led workers to demand higher wages, but landlords refused those demands. By the end of the 1300s peasant revolts broke out in England, France, Belgium and Italy.

The disease took its toll on the church as well. People throughout Christendom had prayed devoutly for deliverance from the plague. Why hadn't those prayers been answered? A new period of political turmoil and philosophical questioning lay ahead.
So while many of you might dwell on the 20th century I would go back to the 15th.
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Old 03-07-2012, 09:39 PM
 
Location: Parts Unknown, Northern California
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Originally Posted by nicet4 View Post

Imagine America today with a population of 313 million if a disease came along that would kill 103 million Americans in less than four years. Think not just of social life but what something like this would do the economy.
.
As did the original Black Death, it would represent an extraordinary boost for labor, the reduction in the workforce making the survivors prized commodities who would be in a powerful bargaining position as a result of their plentiful choices for where they will sell their skills and sweat.

Some economic/social historians have argued that the rise in labor's fortune following the Black Death was the birth of what evolved into the middle classes.
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Old 03-07-2012, 10:14 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Think about the sheer contrast between 1960 and 1969. The 60s were decidedly old-fashioned; I think of that era in black and white, because most TV, films etc were still in black and white. America was still cocooned in an idyllic suburban world of checkered shirts, cars with big fins and fenders, drive-in, hops...we were at loggerheads with the Soviets. Society was very conservative. Segregation in the South. Of course we know how much changed in the 60s...socially, culturally, all those revolutions, wars, the space race. In many respects 1969 isn't much different from today in terms of youth culture, attitudes to social issues such as sex, marriage.etc. Women still had a way to go, as did other races and minorities, but it seems like 1969 was a completely different world to 1960. I think of 1969 in glorious technicolour, it's hard to believe Woodstock was in the same decade as 1960...In contrast 2010 doesn't seem all that different to 2000.

Would you agree more changed in those 10 years than any other in history? Would 1890-1900 be comparable?
I think the 60's were much like the 20's really.Most of the revolutionary ideas never took hold really and time passed them by.
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Old 03-07-2012, 10:24 PM
 
Location: southern california
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what i would agree to is that in 1963 there was a melt down.
the entire structure changed from 63 to 69. it was not gradual.
mass introduction to drugs caused this. drugs on a scale never before inflicted on a people.
u remember those crazy baptists burning beatle albums? they werent crazy, timothy leary and sgt peppers lonely hearts club band turned millions into drug addicts, broke down our morals and good cultural mechanisms, cultural destruction of european/american culture. divorce skyrocketed. many false prophets . the feminist promises of the 60's did not come true, nor did the promise that drugs would set us free.
nor that AA civil rights would bring forth a peaceful and loving rainbow brotherhood.
nor that the civil rights was for everybody, not just AA and wasp females. global economy would produce global prosperity. lies lies lies.
many false prophets came from the 60's.
the saddest part is that dancing and dating became 4 letter words.
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