U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > History
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Which interests you more?
Greek culture/history 16 50.00%
Roman culture/history 16 50.00%
Voters: 32. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 04-16-2012, 07:28 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,682 posts, read 48,288,161 times
Reputation: 11862

Advertisements

Do you have a preference for either one?

By Greek history I would say roughly the beginning of the Ancient Greek period, around 900-800 BC (Athens was founded around this time), the Olympic games in 776 BC which began with the celebration of many of the cults like Dionysus. Many of the early Greek city states were founded in this era, and classics such as the Iliad were supposed to have been penned. This was post civilizations like Crete and the Mycaenean forerunners.

It also extends into 'Classical', 'Hellenistic' and 'Roman' Greek, which saw Greek culture flourish in Greece, the islands of Asia Minor, and great philosophers, scientists etc like Plato, Socrates, Archimedes etc. The early classical period saw the Peloponesian War with Persia etc.

Roman history would be from the beginning of the first republic, around 400 BC I think, to the fall of the Western Roman Empire (sacking of Roman).

In terms of culture, I find Hellenistic more interesting; not least because Romans 'borrowed' or incorporated a lot of Greek culture into their own. In terms of history, I'd say they're about on par, since the Roman Empire spanned most of the known world and many of the great cities of Europe, London, Paris, Barcelona and Rome itself have Roman origins. The legacy of Roman occupation can still be seen from Bath to Bulgaria.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-16-2012, 09:07 AM
 
14,781 posts, read 37,909,122 times
Reputation: 14476
I'm pretty much in your camp...Culturally I find Greece more interesting to study. Greek culture really is the root of western civilization. In terms of politics/wars/history the Romans are more interesting to me. The interesting piece of course is the interplay between the two. if Greek culture is the root of western civilization, it is only so because it was carried to the corners of the known world by the Romans.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2012, 09:18 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,682 posts, read 48,288,161 times
Reputation: 11862
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJGOAT View Post
I'm pretty much in your camp...Culturally I find Greece more interesting to study. Greek culture really is the root of western civilization. In terms of politics/wars/history the Romans are more interesting to me. The interesting piece of course is the interplay between the two. if Greek culture is the root of western civilization, it is only so because it was carried to the corners of the known world by the Romans.
The cultural process whereby Rome incorporated Greek culture and beliefs was interesting. It's somewhere between colonisation but also cultural diffusion, a similar parallel can be seen in Ming China with the Mongols ruling China but taking on their culture.

'Roman Greece' seemed to thrive in the eastern part of the Empire, and that rift can be seen in the development of the later Eastern Roman Empire which became Byzantium and the Orthodox Church.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2012, 01:57 AM
 
20 posts, read 23,310 times
Reputation: 16
Who is the greatest person in Roman and Greek history.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-26-2012, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Maryland about 20 miles NW of DC
6,106 posts, read 5,352,969 times
Reputation: 2446
Quote:
Originally Posted by sumonht1990 View Post
Who is the greatest person in Roman and Greek history.

For Rome the greatest person would have to be Octavian (Caesar Augustus) with kudos to Trajan, Hadrian ,Marcus Auerlius, Constantine I and Justinian.

For Greece it would be Alexander the Great . Honorable mentions go to Leonidas and the Greek Philosophers trio Socrates, Plato and Aristotle .
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-26-2012, 02:01 PM
 
14,781 posts, read 37,909,122 times
Reputation: 14476
Quote:
Originally Posted by mwruckman View Post
For Rome the greatest person would have to be Octavian (Caesar Augustus) with kudos to Trajan, Hadrian ,Marcus Auerlius, Constantine I and Justinian.

For Greece it would be Alexander the Great . Honorable mentions go to Leonidas and the Greek Philosophers trio Socrates, Plato and Aristotle .
Good list. If I had to pick one from them all it would have to be the philosophers simply for their lasting impact on western civilization that has certainly transcended millenia. Of course, if it wasn't for the others on the list, those folks may just be obscure historical figures no one knows about.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-27-2012, 03:21 PM
 
13,138 posts, read 37,692,489 times
Reputation: 12166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Do you have a preference for either one?
Romans for their military

Greeks for their esotericism

Favorite Roman is Military Dictator General Aetius

Favorite Greek is Statesman General Pericles

Favorite Roman female is Galla Placidia (Only female Roman ruler ''de facto'')

Favorite Greek female is Cynisca (first female to ever win against men ''chariot races'' at ancient olympics)

Last edited by Six Foot Three; 04-27-2012 at 04:12 PM.. Reason: 6 ft 3
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2012, 10:54 PM
 
9,153 posts, read 7,852,276 times
Reputation: 4535
People do not give the greeks enough credit for their military prowess. Alexander the Great is actually Greek. They say he is from Macedonia, and everyone thinks of the country in the former Yugoslavia, which is very close. However in Ancient times, there was a section of Greece above Thessaly, and just below Thrace called Macedon, or Macedonia. This is where Alexander and his family is from. It was a part of Greece just like Epirus, and Sicily used to be. Alexander is probably the best warrior Greece has ever produced, and really represents the Greek Art of War.

But I always wonder how come Greece is considered the root of Western Civilization. I always though after the fall of Rome, just about everyone forgot what had happened then. The germanic tribes settled everywhere, and brought with them Feudalism, and even before Christianity brought the god fearing / bible thumping culture to Europe. I always thought those were the biggest influence.

What was Greece to the rest of Europe before Rome? Did the ancient Britons, Picts, and Norsemen eagerly send their children to Greece to study? Did the Slavs look to Greece for the lastest story telling, and fashion? Did the Gauls take luxury cruises on wooden boats in the Aegean Sea?
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-29-2012, 07:48 AM
 
19,111 posts, read 58,153,895 times
Reputation: 34501
I find Greek culture fascinating simply because the intelligentsia of the period were willing to don a variety of philosophies and ways of living like trying on coats in a store. They didn't just think about what it would be to live (for example) like a dog, they lived it. The variety of philosophical thought was amazing and contagious. Not only was there a major impact on the Romans, but the Hellenic period of Hebrew civilization almost destroyed it, Persia became "enlightened" (in a fashion) from it, and Alexander was the first "conqueror" to figure out, on a massive scale, how to conquer and rule with a light hand.

Roman civilization is more a study of strategies, logistics, institutional architecture, and internecine plots (although the Greeks certainly had their share of those as well).
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-30-2012, 08:39 AM
 
13,138 posts, read 37,692,489 times
Reputation: 12166
I think that there's a perception that the Greeks could only fight and kick ass under Alexander the Great and that's just not true as during earlier times (late 400's) the Greek armies who were vastly outnumbered by some 10-1 if not more defeated the Persians in two huge battles firstly under Greek general Miltiades at the Battle of Marathon 490 b.c. and secondly during the sea battle under general/admiral Thermistocles at the Battle of Salamis 480 b.c. as well as several other smaller battles to secure the Greek homeland for centuries to come (until Romans).


Infact if not for those Greek victories during the late 400's there ''may'' have never been a macedonian Phillip or Alexander of any substantial power as the entire balkans probably would've been Persian.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > History
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top