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Old 01-22-2013, 03:23 PM
 
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Know of a newly released history book of interest? If so post it here with a short description.
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Old 01-23-2013, 02:19 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
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I know of dozens, haven't necessarily read them but ones I've had my eye on:

The Inventor and the Tycoon: A Gilded Age Murder and the Birth of Moving Pictures: Edward Ball: 9780385525756: Amazon.com: Books

Quote:
From the National Book Award-winning author of Slaves in the Family, a riveting true life/true crime narrative of the partnership between the murderer who invented the movies and the robber baron who built the railroads.

One hundred and thirty years ago Eadweard Muybridge invented stop-motion photography, anticipating and making possible motion pictures. He was the first to capture time and play it back for an audience, giving birth to visual media and screen entertainments of all kinds. Yet the artist and inventor Muybridge was also a murderer who killed coolly and meticulously, and his trial is one of the early instances of a media sensation. His patron was railroad tycoon (and former California governor) Leland Stanford, whose particular obsession was whether four hooves of a running horse ever left the ground at once. Stanford hired Muybridge and his camera to answer that question. And between them, the murderer and the railroad mogul launched the age of visual media.

Set in California during its frontier decades, The Tycoon and the Inventor interweaves Muybridge's quest to unlock the secrets of motion through photography, an obsessive murder plot, and the peculiar partnership of an eccentric inventor and a driven entrepreneur. A tale from the great American West, this popular history unspools a story of passion, wealth, and sinister ingenuity.
Ambition, A History: From Vice to Virtue: William Casey King: 9780300182804: Amazon.com: Books

Quote:
From rags to riches, log house to White House, enslaved to liberator, ghetto to CEO, ambition fuels the American Dream. Americans are driven by ambition. Yet at the time of the nation's founding, ambition was viewed as a dangerous vice, everything from "a canker on the soul" to the impetus for original sin. This engaging book explores ambition's surprising transformation, tracing attitudes from classical antiquity to early modern Europe to the New World and America's founding. From this broad historical perspective, William Casey King deepens our understanding of the American mythos and offers a striking reinterpretation of the introduction to the Declaration of Independence.

Through an innovative array of sources and authors—Aquinas, Dante, Machiavelli, the Geneva Bible, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Thomas Jefferson, and many others—King demonstrates that a transformed view of ambition became possible the moment Europe realized that Columbus had discovered not a new route but a new world. In addition the author argues that reconstituting ambition as a virtue was a necessary precondition of the American republic. The book suggests that even in the twenty-first century, ambition has never fully lost its ties to vice and continues to exhibit a dual nature, positive or negative depending upon the ends, the means, and the individual involved.
The Hour of Peril: The Secret Plot to Murder Lincoln Before the Civil War: Daniel Stashower: Amazon.com: Kindle Store

Quote:
Daniel Stashower, the two-time Edgar award–winning author of The Beautiful Cigar Girl, uncovers the riveting true story of the “Baltimore Plot,” an audacious conspiracy to assassinate Abraham Lincoln on the eve of the Civil War in THE HOUR OF PERIL.

In February of 1861, just days before he assumed the presidency, Abraham Lincoln faced a “clear and fully-matured” threat of assassination as he traveled by train from Springfield to Washington for his inauguration. Over a period of thirteen days the legendary detective Allan Pinkerton worked feverishly to detect and thwart the plot, assisted by a captivating young widow named Kate Warne, America’s first female private eye.

As Lincoln’s train rolled inexorably toward “the seat of danger,” Pinkerton struggled to unravel the ever-changing details of the murder plot, even as he contended with the intractability of Lincoln and his advisors, who refused to believe that the danger was real. With time running out Pinkerton took a desperate gamble, staking Lincoln’s life—and the future of the nation—on a “perilous feint” that seemed to offer the only chance that Lincoln would survive to become president. Shrouded in secrecy—and, later, mired in controversy—the story of the “Baltimore Plot” is one of the great untold tales of the Civil War era, and Stashower has crafted this spellbinding historical narrative with the pace and urgency of a race-against-the-clock thriller.
The Watchers: A Secret History of the Reign of Elizabeth I: Stephen Alford: 9781608190096: Amazon.com: Books

Quote:
In a Europe aflame with wars of religion and dynastic conflicts, Elizabeth I came to the throne of a realm encircled by menace. To the great Catholic powers of France and Spain, England was a heretic pariah state, a canker to be cut away for the health of the greater body of Christendom. Elizabeth's government, defending God's true Church of England and its leader, the queen, could stop at nothing to defend itself.

Headed by the brilliant, enigmatic, and widely feared Sir Francis Walsingham, the Elizabethan state deployed every dark art: spies, double agents, cryptography, and torture. Delving deeply into sixteenth-century archives, Stephen Alford offers a groundbreaking, chillingly vivid depiction of Elizabethan espionage, literally recovering it from the shadows. In his company we follow Her Majesty's agents through the streets of London and Rome, and into the dank cells of the Tower. We see the world as they saw it-ever unsure who could be trusted or when the fatal knock on their own door might come. The Watchers is a riveting exploration of loyalty, faith, betrayal, and deception with the highest possible stakes, in a world poised between the Middle Ages and modernity.
Also, there's a bunch of Brief Histories recently published by Robinson Books that look good.
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Old 01-26-2013, 08:15 AM
Status: "119 N/A" (set 26 days ago)
 
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The "Fall of the House of Dixie" I just started reading the book. I have had it for two weeks. The NPR interview of the author got me inspired to try to get through it. There are apparently good and bad reviews of it on amazon.


“This book limns the relationship between slavery and the rise and fall of the Confederacy more clearly and starkly than any other study. General readers and seasoned scholars alike will find new information and insights in this eye-opening account.” —James M. McPherson, author of Battle Cry of Freedom
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Old 01-26-2013, 01:07 PM
 
31,387 posts, read 37,060,237 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thriftylefty View Post
The "Fall of the House of Dixie" I just started reading the book. I have had it for two weeks. The NPR interview of the author got me inspired to try to get through it. There are apparently good and bad reviews of it on amazon.
Is this the author who speculated during the interview that slavery quite possibly would have lasted into the 20th century?
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Old 01-28-2013, 08:21 AM
Status: "119 N/A" (set 26 days ago)
 
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Originally Posted by ovcatto View Post
Is this the author who speculated during the interview that slavery quite possibly would have lasted into the 20th century?
I only caught the end of the interview but here's a link





The Fall Of the house of dixie : NPR Search (BETA)
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Old 01-29-2013, 04:08 PM
 
Location: Elsewhere
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I vote that ovcatto wins the City-Data contest just for starting this thread.
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Old 02-02-2013, 05:40 AM
 
Location: Miami, FL
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He did not contribute a book though. One would think an OP would add information and motivation by providing a selection of his own.

Last edited by Felix C; 02-02-2013 at 05:48 AM..
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Old 02-02-2013, 07:05 AM
Status: "119 N/A" (set 26 days ago)
 
12,964 posts, read 13,681,864 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Felix C View Post
He did not contribute a book though. One would think an OP would add information and motivation by providing a selection of his own.
And you also posted without contributing a book.
One would think a poster would add information and motivation by providing a selection of his own instead of criticism.
You might want to see how well the "Today in the Civil War" thread is doing. over 20,000 views

Last edited by thriftylefty; 02-02-2013 at 07:20 AM..
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Old 02-02-2013, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Miami, FL
8,087 posts, read 9,842,681 times
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It was the truth not criticism. Too bad for you if you cannot see the difference.

Ironic that I do post actual book references when responding to historical questions here. Not wikipedia or unvetted Internet sources.

Civil War thread has no bearing on this thread.

There have been similar threads in the book section over the previous few years. I respond there.
https://www.city-data.com/forum/books...read-year.html
https://www.city-data.com/forum/books...ory-books.html
https://www.city-data.com/forum/books...n-fiction.html
https://www.city-data.com/forum/books...phy-youve.html
https://www.city-data.com/forum/books...h-century.html
https://www.city-data.com/forum/books...ggestions.html

Last edited by Felix C; 02-02-2013 at 10:02 AM..
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Old 02-02-2013, 11:51 AM
 
Location: North Carolina
10,214 posts, read 17,885,184 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thriftylefty View Post
And you also posted without contributing a book.
No one is suggesting Felix win the City-Data Most Informative Poster contest though.

It is a great idea for a topic but Felix's point is valid: the OP hasn't contributed anything - how can someone win "most informative poster" for this topic alone when they haven't been informative in this topic? I'm not saying there's anything wrong with what the OP has done (I think it's a great topic!) or that he/she hasn't been informative in other topics, just that I can't see why he/she should win the contest for this topic. Maybe if there was a "best topic ideas", then yeah!

Anyway, can we get back to the original topic?

I noticed this one has been reissued in the UK to coincide with the new TV show Mr. Selfridge:

Shopping, Seduction & Mr Selfridge: Amazon.co.uk: Lindy Woodhead: Books

Quote:
In 1909, the largest department store in London's West End, designed and built from scratch, opened in Oxford Street in a glorious burst of publicity. The mastermind behind the façade was American retail genius Harry Gordon Selfridge: maverick businessman, risk-taker, dandy and one of the greatest showmen the retail world has ever known. His talents were to create the seduction of shopping, and as his success and fame grew, so did his glittering lifestyle: mansions, yachts, gambling, racehorses - and mistresses. From the glamour of Edwardian England, through the turmoil of the Great War and the heady excesses of the 1920s and beyond, Selfridges Department Store was 'a theatre with the curtain going up at 9 o'clock each morning'. Mr Selfridge reveals the captivating story of the rise and fall of the man who revolutionised the way we shop.
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