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Old 06-17-2013, 11:43 AM
 
9,965 posts, read 15,412,107 times
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I was a teenager in the 90s so gangster rap was going to be the downfall of Western Civilization as we knew it. And Two Live Crew was going to turn us all into sex-crazed rapists. No one got as worried about grunge because it sounded close enough to the baby boomer's parents late 60s and 70s rock records. People weren't as worried about rock music after the whole sublminial messages in heavy metal music and Tipper Gore/PMRC era subsided.

Also violent video games...I think Mortal Kombat was a big scary blot for the moral majority crowd---this was long before Grand Theft Auto got everyone all worked up over a decade later... Violent films was another big one in the early 90s. I remember there'd always be news stories on "Just how violent are the films your kid is watching" about how violent RoboCop 2 and Die Hard 2 and Total Recall were and so on...
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Old 06-17-2013, 12:18 PM
 
Location: SGV, CA
816 posts, read 1,649,227 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PatDJohns View Post
Rap went mainstream long before Eminem. Run-DMC was very popular in the mid-late 80s and I would say that was when rap went mainstream. By 1990, hip-hop was the second best selling genre of music, second to rock.
True but I'm talking about where I grew up in conservative, upper middle class middle American suburbia. In my neighborhood went to great lengths to shield us from and condition us to reject 'degenerative' pop culture. Rap was mainstream but in our little bubble it was dismissed as a crude, lower class 'black' thing. It wasn't until Eminem that all the soccer moms realized what their little 'angels' were really listening to.
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Old 06-17-2013, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Lehigh Valley, PA
2,309 posts, read 3,809,403 times
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For me it was the hardcore punk movement.

I remember being at my friends church in 1980 when I was 14 years old being told that the punk rock movement was controlled by the devil.

Little did they know I had already gone to a Dead Kennedy's show and an Exploited show a few months prior.
I even got a black eye in the mosh pit at the Dead Kennedy's show when I was slam dancing.
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Old 06-17-2013, 06:12 PM
Status: "edgy. .." (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
20,331 posts, read 25,423,483 times
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In the late 1970s it would have been Punk Rock. And I lived blocks from CBGBs.
The black leather jackets, the mini skirts and ripped fishnets, girls with hair bleached white or guys with purple hair.

The MUSIC - FAST LOUD and BRILLIANT!

Disco didn't scare anyone. Parents liked it and they made a movie about it. Innocuous clap trap.
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Old 06-17-2013, 06:24 PM
 
Location: Orange County, CA
3,726 posts, read 5,528,699 times
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Originally Posted by msgsing View Post
Rock and Roll in the 50's. Especially in the South where it was associated with the racist sentiments against black people.
Elvis was demonized from many a pulpit, so it was not just black music being the target.
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Old 06-17-2013, 06:53 PM
 
596 posts, read 858,050 times
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Disco was demonized in the 1970s. Not necessarily by the older/conservative factions, but by the younger crowd who preferred rock 'n roll.

Disco Demolition Night - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 06-17-2013, 07:51 PM
 
Location: stuck in the woods with bears and moose
22,372 posts, read 21,446,703 times
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In the 50s on tv they would only show Elvis from the waist up. No one in school or church told us anything negative though, it was just the tv people.

Of course in the 60s if a young man had a beard he was considered dirty and a degenerate.
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Old 06-17-2013, 08:53 PM
 
Location: California
32,255 posts, read 35,626,386 times
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I remember so many things being "bad" according to my older relatives. Music of course (disco then punk), clothing (fringed suede jackets, bell bottoms, hot pants) and believe it or not there was even some argument over technology, my parents let me have a phone in my room with my own phone number and a TV where I could watch whatever I wanted and have private convos with the door closed! Not everyone thought that was a good idea. Drive in movies were always frowned upon as a date activity because everyone knew what would happen when two young people were alone in a car in the dark...lol.
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Old 06-17-2013, 09:56 PM
 
607 posts, read 1,242,009 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
I was a teenager in the 90s
Also violent video games...I think Mortal Kombat was a big scary blot for the moral majority crowd---this was long before Grand Theft Auto got everyone all worked up over a decade later... Violent films was another big one in the early 90s. I remember there'd always be news stories on "Just how violent are the films your kid is watching" about how violent RoboCop 2 and Die Hard 2 and Total Recall were and so on...
Yea I was too. I remember my buddies and I playing Mortal Kombat and seeing a small splatter of blood come out when you punched one of the characters and we thought it was the coolest thing ever, LOL! If you blinked, you'd miss it, it was that small of a splatter, but none the less, we thought it was the bomb, lol.

And Beavis & Butthead were going to be the downfall of American youth, let me tell ya. That show was a no no in my house, but I spent the night at my buddy's house almost every weekend and his parents went out almost every Saturday night, so Beavis & Butthead it was.

Marilyn Manson was also a big deal back in the late 90's, especially after the Combine shootings. His music, dress, videos, concerts and look were just so shocking and repulsive to the adults back then, but obviously we teens loved him.
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Old 06-18-2013, 06:14 AM
 
13,510 posts, read 15,378,809 times
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I was a teenager in the early Fifties in a small town within the broadcasting range of one of the first radio stations to direct had been called (truly) "race music", redubbed Rhythm n Blues about 1949 to the white teenager. Within a couple of years it was all over the U.S., was now being called Rock n Roll, and the great white world of parents, preachers, politicians and racists were going nuts over it. The frenzy against it was incredible and so over-the-top as to be unbelievable today.

In 1958, appearing before the Smather's Committee in the U.S. Senate, "Ol' Blue Eyes" Frank Sinatra howled: "Rock and roll is the most brutal, ugly, desperate vicious form of expression it has been my misfortune to hear. Rock n' roll smells phony and false. It is sung, played and written for the most part by cretinous goons, and by means of its almost imbecilic reiteration, and sly, lewd -- in plain fact, dirty -- lyrics . . . it manages to be the martial music of every sideburned delinquent on the face of the earth."Who would have known better about "cretinous goons," of course, than Sinatra, who loved being chummy with Mafioso bosses?

Perhaps the most bizarre moment came when the Rev. Elder Beck delivered his famous anti-Rock and Roll sermon. I attached the audio...a bit hard to follow, but it is the real deal...he is not putting on......"killed his mother after rock n roll concert"...."...rolling into the penitentiary, rolling into the electric chair!"


Elder Charles Beck - Rock and Roll Sermon (Raw Gospel) - YouTube

For anyone who listens to this all the way to the end, the irony will be clear....it was music, such as that you hear being literally "incited" from his congregation by Elder Beck that was one of the primary sources of Rhythm n Blues, which in a tamed down version became Rock n Roll. My girlfriend and I were only two of the avid white teenage listeners to Elder Beck's live church broadcasts. This man and his church people did to music what Elvis Presley only wished he could have. You gotta love Elder Beck, he was havening it both ways.
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