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View Poll Results: What does turn of the century mean?
1880/1980-1920/2020 1 25.00%
1890/1990-1910/2010 3 75.00%
1900/2000-1910/2010 0 0%
1900/2000-1920/2020 0 0%
Voters: 4. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 06-30-2013, 04:05 AM
 
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Do you see it as a very brief period or more like an entire generation? And would you include some time before the turnover or would it say it refers specifically to the period shortly after?
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Old 07-01-2013, 09:02 AM
 
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In a general sense, "turn of the century" refers to a period of time immediately before and after the "turn of the century". So, 1890-1910 or 1990-2010. In practical applicatons though it can be modified when we are talking about a specific series of events. For instance, 1890-1914 (beginning of WW1) is often referred to as the "turn of the 20th century". When I hear "turn of the century" I always think of it as "circa". For instance, the "turn of the 20th century" to me means circa 1900.
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Old 07-01-2013, 09:51 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJGOAT View Post
In a general sense, "turn of the century" refers to a period of time immediately before and after the "turn of the century". So, 1890-1910 or 1990-2010. In practical applicatons though it can be modified when we are talking about a specific series of events. For instance, 1890-1914 (beginning of WW1) is often referred to as the "turn of the 20th century". When I hear "turn of the century" I always think of it as "circa". For instance, the "turn of the 20th century" to me means circa 1900.
Would you still consider this the turn of the millennium or would you say we're now well into the 21st century?
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Old 07-01-2013, 10:40 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by belmont22 View Post
Would you still consider this the turn of the millennium or would you say we're now well into the 21st century?
I think from an American perspective, the 21st century started either in Setpember 2001 or with the financial collapse in 2008. Either way, we are in the 21st century.
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Old 07-02-2013, 06:05 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJGOAT View Post
I think from an American perspective, the 21st century started either in Setpember 2001 or with the financial collapse in 2008. Either way, we are in the 21st century.
I think you could also argue it began on 9 November 1989 (fall of the Berlin Wall) or 25 December 1991 (end of the USSR).
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